pork


pork
porkish, porklike, adj.porkless, adj.
/pawrk, pohrk/, n.
1. the flesh of hogs used as food.
2. Informal. appropriations, appointments, etc., made by the government for political reasons rather than for public benefit, as for public buildings or river improvements.
[1250-1300; ME porc < OF < L porcus hog, pig; c. FARROW1]

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Flesh of hogs, usually slaughtered between the ages of six months and one year.

The world's most popular meat, it is consumed fresh in various cuts or preparations, including chops and sausage, or cured or smoked for ham, bacon, dry sausage, or other products. Because pigs may be infected by the parasitic disease trichinosis, fresh pork must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 °F (71 °C) to destroy the parasite. Pork is proscribed by the dietary laws of Islam and Judaism.

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meat
      flesh of hogs, usually slaughtered between the ages of six months and one year. The most desirable pork is grayish pink in colour, firm and fine-grained, well-marbled, and covered with an outer layer of firm white fat. About 30 percent of the meat is consumed as cooked fresh meat; the remainder is cured or smoked for bacon and ham, used in sausage, and rendered to produce lard. Because pigs may be infected by the parasitic disease trichinosis, pork must be cooked to an internal temperature of 160° F in order to destroy the disease-causing organism.

      Pork carcasses are graded according to the amount of edible meat they will yield. In the United States, where individual cuts are not graded, a U.S. Number 1 carcass is one having the most satisfactory ratio of fat to lean; Number 2, Number 3, and Number 4 have a higher proportion of fat, reducing the amount of lean. Utility-grade pork, which is usually from mature animals, has too little fat and is less firm. The main cuts of pork are hams, spareribs, loin roasts and chops, bellies, picnic shoulders, and shoulder butts.

      Pork is one of the most versatile of meats and is consumed around the world. Because it is proscribed by the dietary laws of Judaism and Islām, however, pork is virtually unknown in the cuisines of the Middle East and those of some local populations in Asia and Africa. The chief pork-consuming countries (on a per capita basis) are Germany, Denmark, Poland, and Austria.

      In Western cooking fresh pork is commonly roasted, choice cuts being the loin, leg, and rib sections known as spareribs. Chops from the loin and ribs are usually grilled or pan-fried. A spit-roasted whole young piglet, or suckling pig, is a delicacy in central and eastern Europe; wild pigs have traditionally been cooked in a similar manner throughout the Pacific. Less desirable parts—ears, tail, hocks, feet, brains—and the fatty portions of the back of the carcass (fatback), may be cooked with various greens, especially in the southern United States; although originating in economic necessity, this distinctive style of pork cookery has an important place in American regional cuisine.

      In China and Southeast Asia pork is commonly shredded or cubed and stir-fried with vegetables and spices. Pork-and-vegetable mixtures are also used to stuff a variety of small rolls, buns, and dumplings.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • pork — (n.) early 13c., flesh of a pig as food, from L. porcus pig, tame swine, from PIE *porko young swine (Cf. Umbrian purka; O.C.S. prase young pig; Lith. parsas pig; O.E. fearh, M.Du. varken, both from P.Gmc. *farhaz). Porker …   Etymology dictionary

  • pork — [pôrk] n. [ME porc < OFr < L porcus, a pig < IE * pork̑os, pig > FARROW1] 1. Obs. a pig or hog 2. the flesh of a pig or hog, used as food, esp. when used fresh, or uncured ☆ 3. Informal money, jobs, etc. received as pork barrel …   English World dictionary

  • pork|y — «PR kee, POHR », adjective, pork|i|er, pork|i|est. 1. of or like pork: »a porky taste. 2. fat: »a porky face …   Useful english dictionary

  • pork — [po:k US po:rk] n [U] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: porc pig , from Latin porcus] 1.) the meat from pigs ▪ pork chops 2.) AmE informal government money spent in a particular area in order to get political advantages used to show… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • pork — [ pɔrk ] noun uncount * the meat from a pig: Do you eat pork? pork chops ─ compare BACON, HAM …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Pork — Pork, n. [F. porc, L. porcus hog, pig. See {Farrow} a litter of pigs, and cf. {Porcelain}, {Porpoise}.] The flesh of swine, fresh or salted, used for food. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pork̂o-s —     pork̂o s     English meaning: pig     Deutsche Übersetzung: ‘schwein” (“neugeborenes Tier, Ferkel”)     Note: From an extended zero grade of Root eĝhi : “ hedgehog “ derived Root ĝhers , ĝher : “rigid, *pig” > Root pork̂o s : “pig” :… …   Proto-Indo-European etymological dictionary

  • Pork — Pork, verschnittenes Schwein …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • pork — ► NOUN ▪ the flesh of a pig used as food, especially when uncured. ORIGIN Latin porcus pig …   English terms dictionary

  • pork|er — «PR kuhr, POHR », noun. a pig, especially one fattened to eat: »Beechmast is very good feeding for swine to make them porkers, and for bacon (Captain John Smith) …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pork — For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). Pork tenderloin served French style …   Wikipedia


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