porch


porch
porchless, adj.porchlike, adj.
/pawrch, pohrch/, n.
1. an exterior appendage to a building, forming a covered approach or vestibule to a doorway.
2. a veranda.
3. the Porch, the portico or stoa in the agora of ancient Athens, where the Stoic philosopher Zeno of Citium and his followers met.
4. Obs. a portico.
[1250-1300; ME porche < OF < L porticus porch, portico]

* * *

Roofed structure, usually open at front and sides, projecting from the face of a building and used to protect an entrance.

If colonnaded, it may be called a portico. A veranda is typically a long porch surrounded by a railing, often extending along more than one side of a building. Simple porches were exceedingly common in the domestic architecture of Britain and the U.S. from the late 18th century. In Gothic cathedrals the porch was often a small gabled structure projecting from the northern or southern walls of the nave. See also loggia, narthex.

* * *

      roofed structure, usually open at the sides, projecting from the face of a building and used to protect the entrance. It is also known in the United States as a veranda and is sometimes referred to as a portico. A loggia may also serve as a porch.

      There is little material evidence of the existence of the porch before the period of Classical antiquity, although Egyptian wall paintings seem to indicate that porches were occasionally used on houses. One of the most important Greek porches is that of the Tower of the Winds (Winds, Tower of the) at Athens (100 BC), in which two columns of a simple Corinthian order carry a pediment. Roman houses sometimes had long colonnades that served as porches facing the street. This type carried over to the Early Christian basilicas and was probably used as a formal entrance to the narthex, itself a porchlike structure, in buildings such as the Basilica of Old St. Peter's (Rome, AD 330).

      During the Romanesque period, the stately colonnaded church entrance was replaced with a simple projecting porch covering the western doors, as in the 12th-century San Zeno Maggiore at Verona, Italy, in which the columns are carried on marble lions, a motif frequently seen in Lombardy.

      In France, especially in Burgundy, the porch developed into a vaulted structure of great height and importance, two or more bays long and sometimes as wide as the entire church. The porch of the abbey church at Vézelay (1132–40) is a large and particularly fine example of this type, which is sometimes called an antechurch.

      During the Gothic era, two main porch types were developed in English ecclesiastical buildings. The first was a small, gabled porch that projected from the north or south walls of the nave rather than from the west doors, which, in contrast to the west doors of the great French cathedrals, were often small and undistinguished. The other type of porch, called a galilee, was developed to such an extent that it almost became a separate building. Galilees in medieval churches may have been used as courts of law or as places in which corpses lay before interment, but they probably served chiefly as chapels for penitents before their admission to the body of the church.

      In Germany, churches of the Flamboyant Gothic period were frequently decorated with western porches of fantastic richness, with a great use of cusping, tracery, and canopy work, as in the double-arched entrance of the Ulm cathedral (c. 1390) and the triangular porch of the cathedral at Regensburg, Switzerland (1482–86).

      During the Renaissance, porches were typically colonnaded porticos. Simple porches of two or four columns were exceedingly common features of domestic architecture in England and the United States, dating from the late 18th century.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Porch n — porch n …   English expressions

  • Porch — Porch, n. [F. porche, L. porticus, fr. porta a gate, entrance, or passage. See {Port} a gate, and cf. {Portico}.] 1. (Arch.) A covered and inclosed entrance to a building, whether taken from the interior, and forming a sort of vestibule within… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Porch — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Porch» Canción de Pearl Jam Álbum Ten Publicación 1991 Grabación …   Wikipedia Español

  • porch — [pôrch] n. [ME porche < OFr < L porticus < porta, gate, entrance, passage: see PORT5] 1. a covered entrance to a building, usually projecting from the wall and having a separate roof 2. an open or enclosed gallery or room on the outside… …   English World dictionary

  • porch — [po:tʃ US po:rtʃ] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: porche, from Latin porticus, from porta gate ] 1.) BrE an entrance covered by a roof outside the front door of a house or church 2.) AmE a structure built onto the front or back entrance …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • porch — noun count * 1. ) AMERICAN an open area with a floor and a roof, attached to the lower level of a house 2. ) BRITISH a small area covered by a roof at the entrance to a house or other building …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • porch — → porche …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

  • porch — late 13c., from O.Fr. porche, from L. porticus covered gallery, arcade, from porta gate. The L. word was borrowed directly into O.E. as portic …   Etymology dictionary

  • porch — [n] patio balcony, deck, portico, steps, stoop, veranda; concepts 509,513 …   New thesaurus

  • porch — ► NOUN 1) a covered shelter projecting over the entrance of a building. 2) N. Amer. a veranda. ORIGIN Old French porche, from Latin porticus colonnade …   English terms dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.