phenomenalism


phenomenalism
/fi nom"euh nl iz'euhm/, n. Philos.
1. the doctrine that phenomena are the only objects of knowledge or the only form of reality.
2. the view that all things, including human beings, consist simply of the aggregate of their observable, sensory qualities.
[1860-65; PHENOMENAL + -ISM]

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View that statements about material objects are reducible to statements about actual and possible sensations, or sense-data.

According to phenomenalists, a material object is not a mysterious something "behind" the appearances presented in sensation. If it were, the material world would be unknowable; indeed, the term matter is unintelligible unless it somehow can be defined by reference to sensations. In speaking about a material object, then, reference must be made to a very large system of possible sense-data, only some of which (if any) are ever actualized. Thus the statement "There is a fire in the next room" would be analyzed as a series of hypothetical statements such as "If one were to enter the next room with one's eyes open, one would see a bright light of a yellowish orange colour." Some philosophers have objected that it is difficult to remove all references to material objects from the hypothetical statements to which material-object talk is supposedly reducible. See also George Berkeley.

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      a philosophical theory of perception and the external world. Its essential tenet is that propositions about material objects are reducible to propositions about actual and possible sensations, or sense data, or appearances. According to the phenomenalists, a material object is not a mysterious something “behind” the appearances that people experience in sensation. If it were, the material world would be unknowable; indeed, the term matter itself would be unintelligible unless it somehow could be defined by reference to sense experiences. In speaking about a material object, then, reference must be made to a very large group or system of many different possibilities of sensation. Whether actualized or not, these possibilities continue during a certain period of time. When the object is observed, some of these possibilities are actualized, though not all of them. So long as the material object is unobserved, none of them is actualized. In this way, the phenomenalist claims, an “empirical cash value” can be given to the concept of matter by analyzing it in terms of sensations.

      Some philosophers have raised the objection against phenomenalism that, if these hypothetical propositions play such an important role in the phenomenalist analysis—analyzing all material-object expressions in terms of actual and possible sense experiences—it nonetheless remains difficult to avoid using material-object expressions in “if . . . then” clauses, which would render any analysis circular. A second and even more important objection is that it is very difficult to believe that categorical propositions about material objects (e.g., “There is a fire in the next room”) can be analyzed without remainder into sets of hypotheticals or “if . . . then” clauses; i.e., that a statement about what there actually is can be reduced to a set of statements about what there would be if certain (nonexistent) conditions were to be fulfilled.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Phenomenalism — • Philosophical theories that assert that there is no knowledge other than that of phenomena Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Phenomenalism     Phenomenalism      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Phenomenalism — Phe*nom e*nal*ism, n. (Metaph.) That theory which limits positive or scientific knowledge to phenomena only, whether material or spiritual. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • phenomenalism — [fə näm′ə nəliz΄əm] n. the philosophic theory that knowledge is limited to phenomena, either because there is no reality beyond phenomena or because such reality is unknowable phenomenalist n. phenomenalistic adj. phenomenalistically adv …   English World dictionary

  • Phenomenalism — In epistemology and the philosophy of perception, phenomenalism is the view that physical objects do not exist as things in themselves but only as perceptual phenomena or sensory stimuli (e.g. redness, hardness, softness, sweetness, etc.)… …   Wikipedia

  • Phenomenalism — in epistemology and the philosophy of perception, phenomenalism is the view that physical objects do not exist as things in themselves but only as perceptual phenomena or sensory stimuli (e.g. redness, hardness, softness, sweetness, etc.)… …   Mini philosophy glossary

  • phenomenalism — noun Date: circa 1865 1. a theory that limits knowledge to phenomena only 2. a theory that all knowledge is of phenomena and that what is construed to be perception of material objects is simply perception of sense data • phenomenalist noun or… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • phenomenalism — noun The doctrine that physical objects exist only as perceptual phenomena or sensory stimuli …   Wiktionary

  • phenomenalism — The philosophy of perception that elaborates the idea that, in the words of J. S. Mill, ‘objects are the permanent possibilities of sensation’. To inhabit a world of independent, external objects is, on this view, to be the subject of actual and… …   Philosophy dictionary

  • phenomenalism — belief that phenomena are the only realities Philosophical Isms …   Phrontistery dictionary

  • phenomenalism — phe nom·e·nal·ism || fɪ nÉ‘mɪnÉ™lɪzm / É’ n. belief that phenomena comprise the only true knowledge (Philosophy) …   English contemporary dictionary


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