personality disorder


personality disorder
any of a group of mental disorders characterized by deeply ingrained maladaptive patterns of behavior and personality style, which are usually recognizable as early as adolescence and are often lifelong in duration.
[1935-40]

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Mental disorder that is marked by deeply ingrained and lasting patterns of inflexible, maladaptive, or antisocial behaviour to the degree that an individual's social or occupational functioning is impaired.

Rather than being illnesses, personality disorders are enduring and pervasive features of the personality that deviate markedly from the cultural norm. They include the dependent, histrionic, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, antisocial, avoidant, borderline (unstable), paranoid, and schizoid types. The causes appear to be both hereditary and environmental. The most effective treatment combines behavioral and psychotherapeutic therapies (see behaviour therapy; psychotherapy).

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also called  Character Disorder,  

      mental disorder that is marked by deeply ingrained and lasting patterns of inflexible, maladaptive, or antisocial behaviour. A personality disorder is an accentuation of one or more personality traits to the point that the trait significantly impairs an individual's social or occupational functioning. Personality disorders are not, strictly speaking, illnesses, since they need not involve the disruption of emotional, intellectual, or perceptual functioning. In many cases, an individual with a personality disorder does not seek psychiatric treatment for such unless he is pressured to by his relations or by a court.

      There are many different types of personality disorders; they are classified according to the particular personality traits that are accentuated. Persons who have a paranoid personality disorder show a pervasive and unjustified mistrust and suspiciousness of others. They may be secretive or aggressive and are excessively sensitive to implied slights or criticism. Persons with schizoid personality disorder appear aloof, withdrawn, unresponsive, humourless, and dull and are solitary to an abnormal degree. Persons with explosive personality disorder exhibit extreme emotional instability characterized by explosive outbursts of rage upon minor provocation. Persons with histrionic personality disorder persistently display overly dramatic, highly excitable, and intensely expressed behaviour (i.e., histrionics). Persons with dependent personality disorder lack energy and initiative and passively let others assume responsibility for major aspects of their lives. Persons with passive-aggressive personality disorder express their hostility through such indirect means as stubbornness, procrastination, inefficiency, and forgetfulness.

      One of the most important disorders is the antisocial, sociopathic, or psychopathic personality disorder. This disorder is chiefly characterized by a personal history of chronic and continuous antisocial behaviour in which the rights of others are violated. Poor or nonexistent job performance is another major indicator. Persons with antisocial personality disorder make up a significant portion of the criminal and delinquent elements of society. Besides persistent criminality, the symptoms may also include sexual promiscuity or sexual aggression and drug addiction or alcoholism. Sociopaths generally accept their behaviour as natural, feel no guilt when they hurt others, see little reason for or possibility of change, and resist therapy.

      The causes of personality disorders are unknown, though there is undoubtedly a hereditary element involved. Personality traits are, by definition, virtually permanent, and so personality disorders are only partially amenable to treatment, if at all. The most effective treatment combines various behavioral and psychotherapeutic therapies. Medication may be helpful in alleviating periodic anxiety, depression, emotional instability, or paranoid tendencies in some cases.

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Universalium. 2010.

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