pepper


pepper
pepperer, n.pepperish, adj.pepperishly, adv.
/pep"euhr/, n.
1. a pungent condiment obtained from various plants of the genus Piper, esp. from the dried berries, used whole or ground, of the tropical climbing shrub P. nigrum.
2. any plant of the genus Piper. Cf. pepper family.
3. any of several plants of the genus Capsicum, esp. C. annuum, cultivated in many varieties, or C. frutescens.
4. the usually green or red fruit of any of these plants, ranging from mild to very pungent in flavor.
5. the pungent seeds of several varieties of C. annuum or C. frutescens, used ground or whole as a condiment.
6. Baseball. See pepper game.
v.t.
7. to season with or as if with pepper.
8. to sprinkle or cover, as if with pepper; dot.
9. to sprinkle like pepper.
10. to hit with rapidly repeated short jabs.
11. to pelt with or as if with shot or missiles: They peppered the speaker with hard questions.
12. to discharge (shot or missiles) at something.
[bef. 1000; ME peper, piper, OE pipor ( > ON pipari, piparr) < L piper < Gk péperi; cf. OFris piper, D peper, OHG pfeffar (G Pfeffer); these and OE pipor perh. < a common WGmc borrowing < L]

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I
or garden pepper

Any of many plants in the genus Capsicum of the nightshade family, notably C. annuum, C. frutescens, and C. boccatum, native to Central and South America and cultivated extensively throughout tropical Asia and the equatorial New World for their edible, pungent fruits.

Red, green, and yellow mild bell or sweet peppers, rich in vitamins A and C, are used in seasoning and as a vegetable food. The pungency of hot peppers, including tabasco, chili, and cayenne peppers, comes from the compound capsaicin in the internal partitions of the fruit. The spice black pepper comes from an unrelated plant.

Red peppers (Capsicum annuum) from which paprika is made

G.R. Roberts
II
(as used in expressions)
garden pepper
Pepper Claude Denson

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also called  Garden Pepper 
 (Capsicum), any of a great number of plants of the nightshade family, Solanaceae, notably Capsicum annuum, C. frutescens, and C. boccatum, extensively cultivated throughout tropical Asia and equatorial America for their edible, pungent fruits. Peppers, which have been found in prehistoric remains in Peru, were widely grown in Central and South America in pre-Columbian times. Pepper seeds were carried to Spain in 1493 and from there spread rapidly throughout Europe.

      The genus Capsicum comprises all the varied forms of fleshy-fruited peppers grown as herbaceous annuals—the red, green, and yellow peppers rich in vitamins A and C that are used in seasoning and as a vegetable food. Hot peppers, used as relishes, pickled, or ground into a fine powder for use as spices (spice and herb), derive their pungency from the compound capsaicin, a substance characterized by acrid vapours and burning taste, that is located in the internal partitions of the fruit. First isolated in 1876, capsaicin stimulates gastric secretions and, if used in excess, causes inflammation.

      In addition to the cherry (Cerasiforme group) and red cluster (Fasciculatum), these hot varieties, which are red when mature, include the tabasco (Conoides), which is commonly ground and mixed with vinegar to produce a hot sauce, and the long “hot” chili and cayenne (Longum), often called capsicums. Cayenne pepper, said to have originated in Cayenne in French Guiana, is one of the spices derived from these peppers and is produced in many parts of the world.

      The mild bell or sweet peppers (bell pepper) (Grossum) have larger, variously coloured but generally bell-shaped, furrowed, puffy fruits that are used in salads and in cooked dishes. These varieties are harvested when bright green in colour—before the appearance of red or yellow pigment—about 60–80 days after transplanting.

      The term “pimiento,” from the Spanish for “pepper,” is applied to certain mild pepper varieties possessing distinctive flavour but lacking in pungency; these include the European paprikas (paprika), which include the paprika (q.v.) of commerce, a powdered red condiment that was known in Hungary by the late 16th century. “Pimiento,” often pronounced the same as “pimento,” should not be confused with the latter, which is allspice.

      Pepper plants are treated as tender summer annuals outside their native habitat. They are propagated by planting seed directly in the field or by transplanting seedlings started in greenhouses or hotbeds after six to ten weeks.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pepper — may refer to:PlantsThe genus Piper of the pepper family (Piperaceae), including for example: *Black pepper, white and green pepper, Piper nigrum * Cubeb, Piper cubeba , also known as Java pepper * Long pepper, Piper longum The genus Capsicum of… …   Wikipedia

  • Pepper — Pep per, n. [OE. peper, AS. pipor, L. piper, fr. Gr. ?, ?, akin to Skr. pippala, pippali.] 1. A well known, pungently aromatic condiment, the dried berry, either whole or powdered, of the {Piper nigrum}. [1913 Webster] Note: Common, or black,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pepper — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Adam Pepper (* 1991), irischer Eishockeytorhüter Art Pepper (1925–1982), US amerikanischer Jazzsaxophonist Barry Pepper (* 1970), kanadischer Schauspieler Claude Pepper (1900–1989), US amerikanischer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • PEPPER — (Heb. פִּלְפֵּל, pilpel), the fruit of the perennial creeping plant Piper nigrum, which grows in India and in the neighboring tropical regions. The Hebrew name, like its English one, is derived from the Sanskrit pippali. Probably it was first… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Pepper — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Pepper Información personal Origen Kailua Kona, Hawaii, Estados Unidos …   Wikipedia Español

  • pepper — [pep′ər] n. [ME peper < OE pipor < WGmc borrowing < L piper < Gr peperi, via Pers < Sans pippali, peppercorn] 1. a) a pungent condiment obtained from the small, dried fruits of an East Indian vine (Piper nigrum) of the pepper… …   English World dictionary

  • pepper — O.E. pipor, from an early W.Gmc. borrowing of L. piper, from Gk. piperi, probably (via Persian) from Middle Indic pippari, from Skt. pippali long pepper. The L. word is the source of Ger. Pfeffer, It. pepe, Fr. poivre, O.C.S. pipru, Lith. pipiras …   Etymology dictionary

  • Pepper — (Tre Fontane,Италия) Категория отеля: Адрес: 91022 Tre Fontane, Италия Опи …   Каталог отелей

  • Pepper — Pep per, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Peppered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Peppering}.] 1. To sprinkle or season with pepper. [1913 Webster] 2. Figuratively: To shower shot or other missiles, or blows, upon; to pelt; to fill with shot, or cover with bruises or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pepper — ► NOUN 1) a pungent, hot tasting powder made from peppercorns, used to flavour food. 2) a capsicum. ► VERB 1) sprinkle or season with pepper. 2) (usu. be peppered with) scatter liberally over or through. 3) hit repeatedly with small missiles or… …   English terms dictionary

  • Pepper — Pep per, v. i. To fire numerous shots (at). [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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