pelota

pelota
/peuh loh"teuh/; Sp. /pe law"tah/, n., pl. pelotas /-teuhz/; Sp. /-tahs/.
1. a Basque and Spanish game from which jai alai was developed.
2. the game of jai alai.
3. the ball used in pelota and jai alai.
[1890-95; < Sp: ball < MF pelote; see PELLET]

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(Spanish: "little ball") Any of several games in which players take turns, using a glove or implement, hitting a rubber ball either directly at one another or off a wall.

The latter version is related to handball and jai alai, which are played by two or four players on one-, two-, or three-walled courts using gloves, rackets, or bats. In Spain and elsewhere, pelota is a professional sport on which spectators wager.

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▪ court games
(Spanish: “ball”),also called  Pilota, or Pelote Basque,  

      any of a number of glove, racket, or bat court games requiring a rubber-cored ball. These games arose from the old French game known as jeux de paume. Varieties of this game are played in many parts of the world.

      The variations of pelota can be classified as either jeux directs—games in which the players face each other and the pelota is hit freely between opponents—or jeux indirects—games in which the ball is hit off a wall. The second class has many variations, including bare-hand (main nue), the most popular. Pelota courts include the one-walled place libre, the two- or three-walled fronton, and the small, covered court, called the trinquet. The surfaces of these courts range from dirt to highly polished cement.

      In Spain and elsewhere, pelota is a professional game on which spectators wager. Most popular is the difficult and fast variation of remonte, a 35-point game that requires two players on each side and is played with a special chistera, a curved glove with a chestnut or ash frame. The fronton version of pelota, popular in Spain, Mexico, the Philippines, and parts of the United States, is called jai alai.

      Pelota was popular among all social classes by the 16th century but decreased in popularity by the middle of the 18th century, except among the Basques. By the end of the 19th century, the game had spread worldwide. It is widely used as a medium for gambling; amateur play revived at the beginning of the 20th century.

      Pelota was played as a demonstration sport in the Olympic Games in 1924. The Federación Internacional de Pelota Vasca, which organizes the world championships, the first of which was played in 1952, was founded in 1925. See also jai alai.

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Universalium. 2010.


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