patent


patent
patentable, adj.patentability, n.patentably, adv.patently, adv.
/pat"nt/ or, for 10, 12-15, /payt"-/; esp. Brit. /payt"nt/, n.
1. the exclusive right granted by a government to an inventor to manufacture, use, or sell an invention for a certain number of years.
2. an invention or process protected by this right.
3. an official document conferring such a right; letters patent.
4. the instrument by which the government of the United States conveys the legal fee-simple title to public land.
5. patent leather.
adj. patent for 10, 12-15.
6. protected by a patent; patented: a patent cooling device.
7. pertaining to, concerned with, or dealing with patents, esp. on inventions: a patent attorney; patent law.
8. conferred by a patent, as a right or privilege.
9. holding a patent, as a person.
10. readily open to notice or observation; evident; obvious: a patent breach of good manners.
11. made of patent leather: patent shoes.
12. lying open; not enclosed or shut in: a patent field.
13. Chiefly Bot. expanded or spreading.
14. open, as a doorway or a passage.
15. Phonet. open, in various degrees, to the passage of the breath stream.
v.t.
16. to take out a patent on; obtain the exclusive rights to (an invention, process, etc.) by a patent.
17. to originate and establish as one's own.
18. Metall. to heat and quench (wire) so as to prepare for cold-drawing.
19. to grant (public land) by a patent.
[1250-1300; (adj.) ME < L patent- (s. of patens) open, orig. prp. of patere to stand wide open; (n.) ME, short for letters patent, trans. of ML litterae patentes open letters]
Syn. 10. clear, palpable, conspicuous, unconcealed. See apparent.
Ant. 10. dim, obscure, hidden.

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Government grant to an inventor of the exclusive right to make, use, or sell an invention, usually for a specified term.

It may be granted for a process or method that is new, useful, and not obvious, or for a new use of a known process, machine, or composition of matter or material, including asexually reproduced plants and genetically engineered organisms. It may also be granted for any new, original, and ornamental design for an article of manufacture. The first recorded patent for an industrial invention was granted in 1421 in Florence to the architect and engineer Filippo Brunelleschi. Until recently there were wide variations in the patent systems implemented by different countries. The duration of patents recognized generally ranged from 16 to 20 years. In some countries (e.g., France), some patents were given shorter terms because the inventions had an overall general usefulness. In communist countries (e.g., the Soviet Union), patents per se were not recognized; instead, certificates were issued to inventors to ensure that they received some form of compensation for their work. The agreement establishing the World Trade Organization in the 1990s specifies a minimum set of exclusive rights that all patentees must be accorded and mandates a minimum patent term of 20 years from the date an application is filed. Patents are considered personal property and may be sold, assigned, or otherwise transferred.

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law
 a government grant to an inventor of the right to exclude others from making, using, or selling an invention, usually for a limited period. Patents are granted for new and useful machines, manufactured products, and industrial processes and for significant improvements of existing ones. Patents also are granted for new chemical compounds, foods, and medicinal products, as well as for the processes used to produce them. In some countries patents can be granted even for new forms of plant or animal life developed through genetic engineering.

      The first recorded patent for an industrial invention was granted in 1421 in Florence to the architect and engineer Filippo Brunelleschi (Brunelleschi, Filippo). The patent gave him a three-year monopoly on the manufacture of a barge with hoisting gear used to transport marble. It appears that such privileged grants to inventors spread from Italy to other European countries during the next two centuries. In many cases governments issued grants for the importation and establishment of new industries, as in England at the time of Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558–1603). However, the sentiment slowly grew that the English crown was abusing its authority to grant such rights, and the Privy Council and then the common-law courts began to scrutinize patents more carefully. Finally, in 1623 Parliament enacted the Statute of Monopolies. Although the statute prohibited most royal monopolies, it specifically preserved the right to grant “letters patent” for inventions of new manufactures for up to 14 years. In the United States the Constitution (Constitution of the United States of America) authorizes Congress to create a national patent system to “promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts” by “securing for limited Times to…Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective…Discoveries” (Article I, Section 8). Congress passed the first Patent Statute in 1790. France enacted its patent system the following year. By the end of the 19th century, many countries had patent laws, and today there are more than 100 separate jurisdictions regarding patents.

 In most cases an invention must be considered novel and useful in order to be patented. It also must represent a significant advance in the state of the art and cannot merely be an obvious change from what is already known. Patents are frequently granted for improvements of previously patented articles or processes if the requirements of patentability are otherwise met.

      A patent is recognized as a species of property and has many of the attributes of personal property. It may be sold (assigned) to others or mortgaged or may pass to the heirs of a deceased inventor. Because a patent gives the owner the right to exclude others from making, using, or selling the invention, he may authorize others to do any of these things by a license and receive royalties or other compensation for the privilege. A patentee's entitlements also include the right to prevent others from making “equivalents” of the patented technology. If any of these entitlements is abridged, a court can, at the request of the patentee, compel the infringer to pay damages and to refrain from infringement in the future.

      Until recently there were wide variations in the patent systems implemented by different countries. The duration of patents recognized in different jurisdictions ranged from 16 to 20 years. In some countries (e.g., France), certain types of patents were given shorter terms because the inventions had an overall general usefulness. In communist (communism) countries (e.g., the Soviet Union), where property was treated differently, patents per se were not recognized. Instead, certificates were issued to inventors to ensure that they received some form of compensation for their work. China (Chinese law), which had modeled its earlier patent system on that of the Soviet Union, wholly revised its patent law in 1985. In many respects it mirrored the patent law of European countries, with the exception that enterprises rather than individuals were the usual grantees of patent rights.

      In most countries patents are granted only after examination of a patent application by trained inspectors, who review prior inventions and patents to determine whether the invention described in the application is genuinely new. Countries differ widely as to the rigour of such examinations, however. In instances of competing claims to an invention, most countries grant the patent to the first person to file an application. In the United States, in contrast, priority is given to the person who can prove that he was the first inventor, regardless of whether he filed first.

      Not all patent holders are eager to market their inventions or even to license them to others. Many countries refuse to allow a patentee to “sit” on his invention in this fashion and instead compel him to “work” the patented technology, either by commercializing it or by licensing it to someone who will. Similar rules are commonly applied when a principal patent generates other, “dependent” patents; the main patentee may be compelled to grant licenses to those who hold dependent patents. Occasionally, companies holding patents use their rights in attempts to form monopolies that affect entire fields of commerce. In such cases antitrust suits brought by the government may force such companies to license their patents. In the United States there is no requirement to work a patent. An issued U.S. patent that has never been commercialized is presumed to be as valid as one that has spawned an entire new industry.

      As industry and commerce have become increasingly global in character, pressure has increased to harmonize patent systems. In general, inventors must apply for patents in every country in which they wish to claim the right to exclude others from manufacturing, using, or selling their inventions. Efforts have been made to facilitate this process, the first major result of which was the International Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property. Originally adopted in Paris in 1883 and amended several times since, it gave inventors who filed an application in one member country the benefit of that first filing date for applications in other member states. The 1970 Patent Cooperation Treaty simplified the filing of patent applications on the same invention in different countries by providing centralized filing procedures and a standardized application format. The European Patent Convention, which was implemented in 1977, created a European Patent Office that can issue a European patent, which acquires the status of a national patent in each of the member nations designated by the applicant.

      By far the most important outgrowth of the pressure for international harmonization has been the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), which was negotiated as part of the Uruguay Round (1986–94) of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. The TRIPS Agreement requires all member countries of the World Trade Organization (WTO) to extend patent protection to “any inventions, whether products or processes, in all fields of technology, provided that they are new, involve an inventive step and are capable of industrial application.” Countries may refuse to grant patents for “diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical methods,…plants and animals other than micro-organisms,” and inventions whose commercial exploitation would harm “ordre public or morality.” Otherwise, however, they are forbidden to discriminate “as to the place of invention, the field of technology [or] whether products are imported or locally produced.” The agreement specifies a minimum set of exclusive rights that all patentees must be accorded and mandates a minimum patent term of 20 years from the date an application is filed. WTO members, which represent the vast majority of the world's countries, also are obliged to institute fair, equitable, and effective procedures for enforcing patents and other intellectual-property rights.

William Weston Fisher

Additional Reading
Although there is no single definitive resource on the history of patent law, good information can be obtained from H.I. Dutton, The Patent System and Inventive Activity During the Industrial Revolution, 1750–1852 (1984); Christine MacLeod, Inventing the Industrial Revolution: The English Patent System, 1660–1800 (1988); and Edward C. Walterscheid, “To Promote the Progress of Science and Useful Arts: The Background and Origin of the Intellectual Property Clause of the United States Constitution,” Journal of Intellectual Property Law, 2(1):1–56 (Fall 1994).The leading treatise on contemporary patent law is Donald S. Chisum, Chisum on Patents: A Treatise on the Law of Patentability, Validity, and Infringement, 7 vol. in 8 (1978– ). Robert Patrick Merges, Patent Law and Policy: Cases and Materials, 2nd ed. (1997), is an excellent collection of primary sources pertaining to the United States. Summaries of the law in other countries may be found in Dennis Campbell and Susan Cotter (eds.), International Intellectual Property Law (1995– ). The TRIPS Agreement is examined in Michael P. Ryan, Knowledge Diplomacy: Global Competition and the Politics of Intellectual Property (1998).William Weston Fisher

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • patent — pat·ent 1 / pat ənt3 also pāt / adj [Anglo French, from Latin patent patens, from present participle of patēre to be open] 1 a: open to public inspection see also letters patent at letter 2 …   Law dictionary

  • patent — patent, ente [ patɑ̃, ɑ̃t ] adj. • 1292 « lettre patente »; lat. patens, p. prés. de patere « être ouvert; être évident » 1 ♦ Vx Ouvert. Hist. Lettres patentes : décision royale, sous forme de lettre ouverte, accordant ordinairement une faveur à… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Patent — Pat ent (p[a^]t ent or p[=a]t ent), a. [L. patens, entis, p. pr. of patere to be open: cf. F. patent. Cf. {Fathom}.] 1. Note: (Oftener pronounced p[=a]t ent in this sense) Open; expanded; evident; apparent; unconcealed; manifest; public;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • patent — [pat′ nt; ] for adj. 2 4 & 8 [ pāt′ nt, pat′ nt; ] Brit usually [ pāt′ nt] adj. [ME < MFr & L: MFr patent < L patens, prp. of patere, to be open: see PATELLA] 1. a) open to examination by the public: said of a document granting some right… …   English World dictionary

  • patent — pàtent (patȅnt) m <G mn nātā> DEFINICIJA 1. a. dokument, isprava koja potvrđuje isključivo pravo izumitelja na primjenu svoga izuma b. ono na što je dobiven takav dokument; sam izum, poboljšanje ili racionalizacija c. naročito udešen uređaj …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • Patent — Pat ent, n. [Cf. F. patente. See {Patent}, a.] 1. A letter patent, or letters patent; an official document, issued by a sovereign power, conferring a right or privilege on some person or party. Specifically: (a) A writing securing to an invention …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Patent — (Erfindungspatent, franz. brevet d invention, engl. patent; hierzu die Textbeilage: »Übersichtstafel der Patentgesetze der wichtigsten Staaten«), die Urkunde, durch welche die ausschließliche gewerbliche Verwertung einer neuen Erfindung für eine… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Patent — Pat ent, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Patented}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Patenting}.] To grant by patent; to make the subject of a patent; to secure or protect by patent; as, to patent an invention; to patent public lands. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Patent — Sn eine Urkunde über bestimmte Rechte erw. fach. (17. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. patente f. Bestallungsbrief, Gewerbeschein , dieses eine gekürzte Substantivierung aus frz. lettre patente f. offener Brief , nach l. (littera) patēns f.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Patent — (v. lat.), 1) ein offener Brief, etwas zu beglaubigen; 2) obrigkeitliche schriftliche Bekanntmachung einer wichtigen Sache durch Anschläge, so der Besitzergreifung eines erledigten Thrones, eines abgetretenen Landes; 3) schriftliche Bestallung… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • patent — {{/stl 13}}{{stl 8}}rz. mnż I, D. u, Mc. patentncie {{/stl 8}}{{stl 20}} {{/stl 20}}{{stl 12}}1. {{/stl 12}}{{stl 7}} dokument wydawany przez specjalnie powołany do tego urząd, stwierdzający oryginalność wynalazku i nadający jego autorowi prawo… …   Langenscheidt Polski wyjaśnień


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