Parthia


Parthia
/pahr"thee euh/, n.
an ancient country in W Asia, SE of the Caspian Sea: conquered by the Persians A.D. 226; now a part of NE Iran.

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Ancient land, southwestern Asia.

Corresponding roughly to modern northeastern Iran, it formed a province of the Persian Achaemenian dynasty and later of the empire of Alexander the Great. After the dissolution of the Seleucid dynasty с 250 BC, a new Parthian kingdom was founded by Arsaces. The Arsacid dynasty ruled until it was overthrown by the Sāsānian dynasty с AD 226. At its height in the early 1st century BC, it was known as the Parthian empire and included the area between the Euphrates and Indus rivers and between the Amu Darya and the Arabian Sea. It was weakened by internal disorder and by conflict with Rome in the 1st century BC. One of its later capitals was Hecatompylos. The ruins of Ctesiphon, another major Parthian city, are in modern Iraq, near Baghdad. The Parthians were famous as horsemen and archers.

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▪ ancient region, Iran
      ancient land corresponding roughly to the modern region of Khorāsān in Iran. The term is also used in reference to the Parthian empire (247 BC–AD 224). The first certain occurrence of the name is as Parthava in the Bīsitūn inscription (c. 520 BC) of the Achaemenian king Darius I, but Parthava may be only a dialectal variation of the name Parsa (Persian).

      Nothing is known of the history of Parthia while it was part of a satrapy of the Achaemenian Empire. It was joined to Hyrcania (present Gorgān, Iran) in the time of Alexander the Great, and the two remained together as a province of the Seleucid kingdom. During the reigns of Seleucus I (312–281 BC) and Antiochus I Soter (281–261) the Parni (Aparni) nomads probably moved from Central Asia into Parthia and seem to have adopted the speech of the Parthians and been absorbed into the settled population.

      According to tradition (somewhat disputed), the first ruler of the Parthians and founder of the Parthian empire was Arsaces I, who had been a governor under Diodotus, king of the Bactrian Greeks, and who revolted and fled westward to establish his own rule (c. 250–c. 211 BC). By 200 BC Arsaces' successors were firmly established along the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. Later, through the conquests of Mithradates I (reigned 171–138 BC) and Artabanus II (reigned 128–124 BC), all of the Iranian Plateau and the Tigris-Euphrates valley came under Parthian control. The Parthians, however, were troubled by nomad attacks on their northeastern borders as well as attacks by the Scythians. Mithradates II the Great (reigned 123–88 BC), by defeating the Scythians, restored for a while the power of the Arsacids. He also defeated Artavases, king of greater Armenia, whose son Tigranes became a hostage in Parthian hands and was redeemed only for considerable territory. In 92 BC Mithradates II, whose forces were advancing into north Syria against the declining Seleucids, concluded the first treaty between Parthia and Rome. Though beset by insurrections and border wars, Mithradates II continued to control Iran and northern Mesopotamia until his death, after which rival dynastic claimants fought for major territories. The confusion came to an end about 76/75 BC, when the octogenarian king Sanatruces (perhaps a son of Mithradates I) was set on the Parthian throne by the central Asian tribe of the Sacaraucae. Yet it was not until Sanatruces' son and successor, Phraates III (reigned 70–58/57 BC), that the empire was once again in a fairly settled state.

      The earliest Parthian capital was probably at Dara (modern Abivard); one of the later capitals was Hecatompylos, probably near modern Dāmghān. The empire was governed by a small Parthian aristocracy, which successfully made use of the social organizations established by the Seleucids and which tolerated the development of vassal kingdoms. Although not an inventive people, the Parthians controlled most of the trade routes between Asia and the Greco-Roman world, and this control brought them great wealth, which they used on their extensive building activities.

      The feudal and decentralized structure of the Parthian empire may help to explain why, though founded on annexation and perpetually menaced by hostile armies both in the east and in the west, it never took a strong offensive after the days of Mithradates II. Parthia tended to remain on the defensive and even in this role was frequently lacking in energy. The wars between Parthia and Rome therefore were initiated not by the Parthians—deeply injured though they were by the encroachments of Pompey—but by Rome itself. Rome considered itself obliged to enter upon the inheritance of Alexander the Great and, from the time of Pompey, continually attempted the subjection of the Hellenistic countries as far as the Euphrates River and had ambitions to go even farther eastward. With this objective, Marcus Licinius Crassus (Crassus, Marcus Licinius), the Roman triumvir in 54 BC, took the offensive against Parthia; his army, however, was routed at Carrhae (Carrhae, Battle of) the following year. After this battle Mesopotamia was regained by the Parthians, but, apart from the ravaging of Syria (51 BC), the threatened Parthian attack on the Roman Empire never materialized. For more than two centuries, Rome, for its part, occasionally pressed the Parthians and supported one or another claimant to the Parthian throne. After the reign (c. AD51–80) of Vologeses I, there came a period of great disturbances in the history of Parthia, during which at certain times there were two or more kings who reigned concurrently. The Roman emperors Trajan (in 115–117) and Septimius Severus (in 198) penetrated deep into Parthian territory, and these and other foreign invaders appear to have crippled the Parthian kingdom. Finally, in southern Iran the new dynasty of the Sāsānians, under the leadership of Ardashir I (reigned 224–241), overthrew the Parthian princes, ending the history of Parthia.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Parthia — [pär′thē ə] ancient country in SW Asia, southeast of the Caspian Sea Parthian adj., n …   English World dictionary

  • Parthia — Infobox Former Country native name = Ashkâniân (اشکانیان) conventional long name = Parthian Empire common name = Parthia| continent = moved from Category:Asia to the Middle East region = Middle East, Central Asia, and Western Asia country = Iran… …   Wikipedia

  • Parthia — Die Parther (altpersisch Parθava, lat. Parthi) waren ein antikes iranisches Volk, das vom 3. Jahrhundert v. Chr. an im heutigen Iran ein Reich aufbaute, welches schließlich auch große Teile Mesopotamiens, des südwestlichen Mittelasiens und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • PARTHIA — I. PARTHIA Asiae regio, perampla, ab occasu Mediâ, ab Aquilone Hyrcaniâ, ab ortu Arianâ, a meridie Carmaniae desertis terminata. Parthenen Qu. Curtius vocat. l. 6. 2. c. ubi docet Parthos Scitharum progeniem esse, quod et Dionys. testatur.… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Parthia — noun a) a region in northeastern Iran b) territories corresponding to the empire ruled by dynasts from Parthia …   Wiktionary

  • Parthia — geographical name ancient country SW Asia in NE modern Iran …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • PARTHIA —    an ancient country corresponding to Northern Persia; was inhabited by a people of Scythian origin, who adopted the Aryan speech and manners, and subsequently yielded much to Greek influence; after being tributary successively to Assyria, Media …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • Parthia — n. ancient country in western Asia that was conquered by the Persians in AD 226 (occupied the northwestern region of present day Iran) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Parthia — Par•thi•a [[t]ˈpɑr θi ə[/t]] n. anh geg an ancient country in W Asia, SE of the Caspian Sea, in what is now NE Iran …   From formal English to slang


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