parody


parody
parodiable, adj.
/par"euh dee/, n., pl. parodies, v., parodied, parodying.
n.
1. a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing: his hilarious parody of Hamlet's soliloquy.
2. the genre of literary composition represented by such imitations.
3. a burlesque imitation of a musical composition.
4. any humorous, satirical, or burlesque imitation, as of a person, event, etc.
5. the use in the 16th century of borrowed material in a musical setting of the Mass (parody Mass).
6. a poor or feeble imitation or semblance; travesty: His acting is a parody of his past greatness.
v.t.
7. to imitate (a composition, author, etc.) for purposes of ridicule or satire.
8. to imitate poorly or feebly; travesty.
[1590-1600; < L parodia a parody < Gk paroidía a burlesque song or poem. See PAR-, ODE, -Y3]
Syn. 1, 2. See burlesque.

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In literature, a work in which the style of an author is closely imitated for comic effect or in ridicule.

Differing from both burlesque (by the depth of its technical penetration) and travesty (which treats dignified subjects in a trivial manner), parody mercilessly exposes the tricks of manner and thought of its victim and therefore cannot be written without a thorough appreciation of the work it ridicules. Examples date from as early as ancient Greece and occur in nearly all literatures and all periods.

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      (Greek parōidía, “a song sung alongside another”), in literature, a form of satirical criticism or comic mockery that imitates the style and manner of a particular writer or school of writers so as to emphasize the weakness of the writer or the overused conventions of the school. Differing from burlesque by the depth of its technical penetration and from travesty, which treats dignified subjects in a trivial manner, true parody mercilessly exposes the tricks of manner and thought of its victim yet cannot be written without a thorough appreciation of the work that it ridicules.

      An anonymous poet of ancient Greece imitated the epic style of Homer in Batrachomyomachia (The Battle of the Frogs and Mice), one of the earliest examples of parody; Aristophanes parodied the dramatic styles of Aeschylus and Euripides in The Frogs; Chaucer parodied the chivalric romance in “The Tale of Sir Thopas” (c. 1375), as did Cervantes in Don Quixote (1605); Rabelais parodied the Scholastics in Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532–34); Shakespeare (Shakespeare, William) mimicked Christopher Marlowe's high dramatic style in the players' scene in Hamlet and was himself parodied by John Marston, who wrote a travesty of Venus and Adonis entitled The Metamorphosis of Pigmalions Image (1598). The 2nd Duke of Buckingham in The Rehearsal (1671) and Sheridan in The Critic (1779) both parodied the heroic drama, especially Dryden's Conquest of Granada (1670); John Phillips in The Splendid Shilling (1705) caught all the superficial epic mannerisms of Milton's Paradise Lost (1667); Racine parodied Corneille's lofty dramatic style in Les Plaideurs (1668, “The Litigants”); Fielding parodied Richardson's sentimental novel Pamela (1740–41) in Shamela (1741) and Joseph Andrews (1742) and mimicked the heroic play in Tom Thumb (1730).

      In England the first collection of parodies to score a wide success was Rejected Addresses (1812) by Horace and James Smith, a series of dedicatory odes on the reopening of the Drury Lane Theatre in the manner of such contemporary poets as Scott, Byron, Southey, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. Unique among the Victorians is Lewis Carroll (Carroll, Lewis), whose parodies preserve verses that would otherwise not have survived—e.g., Robert Southey's “Old Man's Comforts” (the basis for “You Are Old, Father William”) and the verses of Isaac Watts that gave rise to “How Doth the Little Crocodile” and “The Voice of the Lobster.”

      In the United States the 19th-century poems of Poe, Whitman, Whittier, and Bret Harte were mimicked by their contemporaries, particularly by the poet and translator Bayard Taylor. Because of the variety of accents of 19th-century immigrants, U.S. parody often played on dialect—e.g., Charles G. Leland's Hans Breitmann's Ballads first published under that title in 1884, a parody of the German poets Heine and Uhland in macaronic German American. Among more modern parodists, Samuel Hoffenstein is outstanding for his carefully damaging versions of A.E. Housman and the Georgian poets.

      The art of parody has been encouraged in the 20th century by such periodicals as Punch and The New Yorker. The scope of parody has been widened to take in the far more difficult task of parodying prose. One of the most successful examples is Sir Max Beerbohm's Christmas Garland (1912), a series of Christmas stories in the style and spirit of various contemporary writers, most notably Henry James. Another innovation is double parody, invented by Sir John Squire in the period between World Wars I and II; it is the rendering of the sense of one poet in the style of another—e.g., Squire's version of Thomas Gray's “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” written in the style of Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon River Anthology resulted in “If Gray Had Had to Write His Elegy in the Cemetery of Spoon River Instead of in That of Stoke Poges.” Also outstanding among modern parodists have been Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, Stephen Leacock, and E.B. White.

music
      in music, originally the creative reworking of several voice parts of a preexistent composition to form a new composition, frequently a mass; in modern musical usage, parody usually refers to the humorous imitation of a serious composition. The earliest known parody masses date from the late 14th century, and the procedure became common in the 15th and 16th centuries. The composer of a parody mass used as his model a vocal work such as a chanson, madrigal, or motet, freely reorganizing and expanding the original material, often inserting new sections between borrowed, modified passages. A parody mass is known by the name of its model; e.g., Missa Malheur me bat by Josquin des Prez, a reworking of Jean d'Okeghem's chanson “Malheur me bat” (“Misfortune Has Struck Me”).

      The process of parody also facilitated arrangements of vocal works for lute or keyboard, such as Peter Philips' arrangement for virginal (harpsichord) of the chanson “Bon jour, mon coeur” (“Good Day, My Heart”) by Orlando di Lasso.

      In more recent times the term musical parody came to signify the humorous application of new texts to preexistent vocal pieces, as well as both serious and ironic references to particular musical styles. Mozart's Ein musikalischer Spass (A Musical Joke; K. 522, 1787), deliberately violates any number of technical conventions, concluding with glaringly “wrong” notes; the endless, rapid repetitions of the word amen in Hector Berlioz' oratorio L'Enfance du Christ (The Childhood of Christ; Opus 25, 1854) clearly poke fun at the absurdities of much early 19th-century liturgical music.

      Jacques Offenbach in his operettas (e.g., Orpheus in the Netherworld) frequently parodied serious opera. Similarly, Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg, and others have parodied the styles of predecessors and contemporaries as well as specific genres, including fashionable dances from the valse to the tango and the fox-trot. An American master of musical parody was Charles Ives (1874–1954).

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • parody — I noun amphigory, apery, buffoonery, burlesque, caricature, cartoon, comical representation, distortion, exaggeration, farce, imitation, lampoon, ludicrous imitation, mime, mimicry, mockery, mummery, pasquinade, ridicula imitatio, ridicule,… …   Law dictionary

  • parody — par o*dy (p[a^]r [ o]*d[y^]), n.; pl. {Parodies} (p[a^]r [ o]*d[i^]z). [L. parodia, Gr. parw,di a; para beside + w,dh a song: cf. F. parodie. See {Para }, and {Ode}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A writing in which the language or sentiment of an author is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • parody — par o*dy, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {parodied}; p. pr. & vb. n. {parodying}.] [Cf. F. parodier.] To write a parody upon; to burlesque. [1913 Webster] I have translated, or rather parodied, a poem of Horace. Pope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • parody# — parody n travesty, *caricature, burlesque Analogous words: skit, squib, lampoon, *libel parody vb travesty, caricature, burlesque (see under CARICATURE n) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • parody — [n] imitation, spoof apology, burlesque, caricature, cartoon, copy, derision, farce, irony, jest, joke, lampoon, mime, mimicry, misrepresentation, mockery, mock heroic*, pastiche, play on*, raillery, rib*, ridicule, roast*, satire, send up*, skit …   New thesaurus

  • parody — ► NOUN (pl. parodies) 1) an amusingly exaggerated imitation of the style of a writer, artist, or genre. 2) a feeble imitation. ► VERB (parodies, parodied) ▪ produce a parody of. DERIVATIVES paro …   English terms dictionary

  • parody — [par′ə dē] n. pl. parodies [Fr parodie < L parodia < Gr parōidia, burlesque song < para , beside (see PARA 1) + ōidē, song (see ODE)] 1. a) a literary or musical work imitating the characteristic style of some other work or of a writer… …   English World dictionary

  • Parody — A parody (pronounced|ˈpɛɹədiː US, [Help:IPA| [ˈpaɹədiː] UK), in contemporary usage, is a work created to mock, comment on, or poke fun at an original work, its subject, or author, by means of humorous or satiric imitation. As the literary… …   Wikipedia

  • parody — noun 1 writing/speech/music ADJECTIVE ▪ brilliant, clever ▪ funny, hilarious ▪ cruel ▪ song (esp. AmE) …   Collocations dictionary

  • parody — par|o|dy1 [ˈpærədi] n plural parodies [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: parodia, from Greek, from para ( PARA ) + aidein to sing ] 1.) [U and C] a piece of writing, music etc or an action that copies someone or something in an amusing way parody …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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