Orkney Islands


Orkney Islands
/awrk"nee/
an island group off the NE tip of Scotland. 17,675; 340 sq. mi. (880 sq. km).

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Island group (pop., 2001: 19,245), Scotland.

Lying north of the Scottish mainland, it comprises more than 70 islands and islets and constitutes the Orkney council area. The Orkney Islands, only 20 of which are inhabited, were the Orcades of ancient Classical literature. There is much evidence of prehistoric inhabitants. Norse raiders arrived in the late 8th century AD and colonized the islands in the 9th century. Thereafter they were ruled by Norway and Denmark until Scotland annexed them in 1472. It is a prosperous agricultural area. Kirkwall is the administrative seat.

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      group of more than 70 islands and islets—only about 20 of which are inhabited—in Scotland, lying about 20 miles (32 km) north of the Scottish mainland, across the strait known as the Pentland Firth. The Orkney Islands constitute a council area and belong to the historic county of Orkney.

      The Orkney Islands were the Orcades of ancient classical literature. There remains much evidence of prehistoric occupation at various periods: underground houses, circles, standing stones, and earth houses. Skara Brae, an underground village on the west coast of the island of Mainland, is one of the most complete European relics of the late Neolithic Period; this location and several others on the island collectively were designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1999. Norse (Viking) raiders arrived in the late 8th century and colonized the islands in the 9th century; thereafter the islands were ruled by Norway and Denmark. Celtic missionaries had arrived in the 7th century, but the Norsemen were not converted until much later. Kirkwall's cathedral, dedicated to St. Magnus, was mainly built by Norsemen during the 12th century. Orkney and Shetland passed into Scottish rule in 1472 in compensation for the nonpayment of the dowry of Margaret of Denmark, queen of James III.

      The Orkney Islands were fashioned by glacial erosion of the underlying sandstone, limestone, and igneous rocks into low, undulating hills, covered extensively by glacial deposits. Westerly winds and gales account for the general scarcity of trees. The largest of the islands is Mainland, or Pomona, which is divided into East Mainland and West Mainland; they are connected by a narrow strip of land about 2 miles (3 km) wide between Kirkwall and Scapa Flow. The streams are short, but trout fishing is good. The small islands of Burray and South Ronaldsay, to the south of East Mainland, are now joined to it by causeways constructed during World War II to prevent enemy submarines from entering the naval base at Scapa Flow. The second largest of the Orkney Islands, Hoy, lies south of West Mainland, along with smaller islands such as Graemsay, Flotta, and South Walls. To the north of Mainland, across the Wide Firth and Shapinsay Sound, lie Shapinsay, Rousay, Egilsay, Stronsay, Eday, Westray, Papa Westray, Sanday, North Ronaldsay, and several smaller islands.

      Orkney is a prosperous farming area despite its fragmentation. Its farms are small and owner-occupied, averaging about 35 acres (14 hectares) and using modern mechanical methods to achieve high productivity. Each year more land is claimed for agriculture, but much peat and moor remain. The main agricultural products are beef cattle and eggs, although the raising of pigs and the production of milk (largely for cheese) have both greatly increased. Some fodder crops are grown, but much is imported. Because of the importance of agriculture, the fishing industry has not been developed to the same extent as in the neighbouring Shetland Islands.

      Exploitation of North Sea oil resulted in the construction and operation of a major landfall terminal for the Piper and Claymore oil fields at Flotta on Scapa Flow. This terminal, similar to another at Sullom Voe in Shetland, offers employment in an area where population had declined. Other oil-related activities in Orkney include a limited amount of offshore servicing and the operation of helicopter services from Kirkwall.

      There are only two towns on Mainland: Kirkwall, a royal burgh, and Stromness. Kirkwall is the islands' largest town and their commercial and administrative centre. Both towns are picturesque, with narrow main streets. In Kirkwall there are, in addition to St. Magnus Cathedral, several fine old houses and the ruins of the Bishop's Palace and Earl's Palace.

      Connections between Orkney and the Scottish mainland are good, with daily air service to Kirkwall from Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and Inverness and ferry connections from Stromness to Scrabster (just across the Pentland Firth), Aberdeen, and the Shetland Islands. Area 382 square miles (990 square km). Pop. (2006 est.) 19,770.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Orkney Islands —    ORKNEY ISLANDS, a group forming, with that of Shetland, a maritime county, in the northern extremity of Scotland; and bounded on the north by the waters which divide Orkney from Shetland; on the east by the North Sea; on the south by the… …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • Orkney Islands — Orkney Àrcaibh Flagge von Orkney …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Orkney Islands — [ôrk′nē] [< ON Orkneyjar, lit., seal islands < orkn, a seal + ey,ISLAND] group of islands north of Scotland, constituting an administrative division of Scotland: 377 sq mi (976 sq km); pop. 20,000 …   English World dictionary

  • Orkney Islands — Orcades Orcades Àrcaibh (gd) Carte des Orcades …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Orkney Islands —  Scotland. Properly they can be called Orkney or the Orkney Islands, but not the Orkneys. A native or resident is an Orcadian …   Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

  • Orkney Islands — Admin ASC 2 Code Orig. name Orkney Islands Country and Admin Code GB.SCT.V9 GB …   World countries Adminstrative division ASC I-II

  • Orkney Islands — noun a) A group of islands off north east Scotland. b) The region of Scotland comprising these islands. Syn: Orkneys See Also: Orcadian …   Wiktionary

  • Orkney Islands — isl. group, N of Scotland, comprising Orkney, a co. of Scotland; 376 sq. mi.; pop. 18,134; cap. Kirkwall …   Webster's Gazetteer

  • Orkney Islands — geographical name islands N Scotland constituting an administrative area capital Kirkwall (on Mainland Island) area 376 square miles (978 square kilometers), population 19,570 • Orkneyan adjective or noun …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • ORKNEY ISLANDS —    (30), an archipelago of 90 islands, Pomona the largest, lying north of the Scottish mainland, from which they are separated by the Pentland Firth, 7 m. broad. The scenery is tame, the climate is mild and moist; there are no trees, crops are… …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia


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