orbit


orbit
orbitary, adj.
/awr"bit/, n.
1. the curved path, usually elliptical, described by a planet, satellite, spaceship, etc., around a celestial body, as the sun.
2. the usual course of one's life or range of one's activities.
3. the sphere of power or influence, as of a nation or person: a small nation in the Russian orbit.
4. Physics. (in Bohr theory) the path traced by an electron revolving around the nucleus of an atom.
5. an orb or sphere.
6. Anat.
a. the bony cavity of the skull that contains the eye; eye socket.
b. the eye.
7. Zool. the part surrounding the eye of a bird or insect.
v.t.
8. to move or travel around in an orbital or elliptical path: The earth orbits the sun once every 365.25 days.
9. to send into orbit, as a satellite.
v.i.
10. to go or travel in an orbit.
[1350-1400; ME < L orbita wheel track, course, circuit]

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      in astronomy, path of a body revolving around an attracting centre of mass, as a planet around the Sun or a satellite around a planet. In the 17th century, Johannes Kepler and Isaac Newton discovered the basic physical laws governing orbits; in the 20th century, Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity supplied a more exact description.

      The orbit of a planet is, if unaffected by the attraction of another planet, elliptical; some elliptical orbits are very nearly circles, while others are much elongated. Some bodies may follow parabolic or hyperbolic paths (open-ended curves). The orbit of a body approaching the solar system from a very great distance, curving once around the Sun, and receding again is such an open curve.

      In determining the elements of a body's orbit, at least three positions of the body should be measured. Observations should be spread evenly in time and should extend over a considerable arc of the orbit. Further measurements are necessary to account for the effects of minor disturbing forces, such as planetary attractions, irregularities of mass within the body at the centre of the orbit, and, in the case of some artificial satellites, atmospheric drag.

      An orbit is completely described by six geometric properties called its elements; from them the future positions of the planet can be calculated. The elements are (1) the inclination of the orbit plane and (2) the longitude of the ascending node, which fix the orbit plane; (3) the semimajor axis, (4) the eccentricity and (5) the longitude of periapsis (see apse), which fix the size and shape of the orbit in the orbit plane; and (6) the time of periapsis, which locates the body in the orbit. These are explained below.

      The Sun occupies one of the two foci of the ellipse of a planet's orbit. A line drawn through the point of the planet's closest approach to the Sun (perihelion) and farthest retreat (aphelion) passes through the Sun and is called the line of apsides or major axis of the orbit; one-half this line's length is the semimajor axis, equivalent to the planet's mean distance from the Sun. The eccentricity of an elliptical orbit is a measure of the amount by which it deviates from a circle; it is found by dividing the distance between the focal points of the ellipse by the length of the major axis. To predict the position of the planet at any time it is necessary to know the time when it passed through any definite position; e.g., its time of perihelion passage.

 The inclination, or tilt, of a planet's orbit is measured in degrees of arc from the plane of the Earth's orbit, called the ecliptic. S, at the centre of the drawing—>, represents the Sun. The points where the two orbital planes intersect (as projected in imagination upon the celestial sphere) are called the nodes (node), shown as M and N. V is the vernal equinox, a point on the ecliptic from which several celestial coordinates are measured. The angle VSN, in degrees of arc, is the longitude of the ascending node, i.e., of the point where the moving planet passes north of the plane of Earth's orbit. M, the descending node, is where the planet passes from north to south. The sum of the angles subtended at S by the arcs VN and NA is called the longitude of the perihelion. It defines the direction of the major axis in the plane of the orbit.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
, (of a celestial body) /


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Orbit — (lat. orbita „Geleise“) bezeichnet: in der Raumfahrt die Umlaufbahn eines Objektes um einen Himmelskörper darauf bezogen die Umlaufbahn eines Satelliten um die Erde, siehe Satellitenorbit in der Mathematik die Menge aller Punkte, in die ein… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Orbit 1 —   Author(s) Edited by Damon Knight …   Wikipedia

  • orbit — [ôr′bit] n. [MFr orbite < ML orbita < L, path, track < orbis, a circle, wheel] 1. the bony cavity containing the eye; eye socket 2. [L orbita] a) the actual or imaginary path taken by a celestial body during its periodic revolution… …   English World dictionary

  • Orbit — Or bit, n. [L. orbita a track or rut made by a wheel, course, circuit, fr. orbis a circle: cf. F. orbite. See 2d {Orb}.] 1. (Astron.) The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of Jupiter …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ORBit — is a CORBA 2.4 compliant Object Request Broker (ORB). It features mature C, C++ and Python bindings, and less developed bindings for Perl, Lisp, Pascal, Ruby, and Tcl. Most of the code is distributed under the LGPL license, although the IDL… …   Wikipedia

  • Orbit — (в переводе с англ.  «орбита») может означать: Марку жевательной резинки фирмы Wrigley Orbit Downloader  программу для закачки файлов из Интернет. Orbit@home  проект распределённых вычислений. См. также Орбита (значения) … …   Википедия

  • orbit — [n1] circuit, revolution apogee, circle, circumgyration, course, curve, cycle, ellipse, lap, locus, path, pattern, perigee, rotation, round, track, trajectory; concepts 436,738 orbit [n2] influence, domain ambit, area, arena, boundary, bounds,… …   New thesaurus

  • orbit — ► NOUN 1) the regularly repeated elliptical course of a celestial object or spacecraft around a star or planet. 2) a field of activity or influence. 3) the path of an electron round an atomic nucleus. 4) Anatomy the eye socket. ► VERB (orbited,… …   English terms dictionary

  • Orbit — Orbit, feinkörniger Diorit …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • orbit — index ambit, area (province), bailiwick, capacity (sphere), circuit, province, purview …   Law dictionary

  • Orbit — Orbit,der:⇨Umlaufbahn …   Das Wörterbuch der Synonyme


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