ocean liner


ocean liner
an oceangoing passenger ship, operating either as one unit of a regular scheduled service or as a cruise ship.
[1830-40, Amer.]

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Large merchant ship that visits designated ports on a regular schedule, carrying whatever cargo and passengers are available on the date of sailing.

The first liners were operated in the North Atlantic, notably by Samuel Cunard of Britain, beginning in 1840. Their heyday lasted from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. Many were extraordinarily luxurious. Among the most famous were Cunarders such as the Mauretania and the Queen Mary; the German Vaterland (later renamed Leviathan), for many years the largest ship afloat; the ill-fated Titanic; and the United States. Their reign ended in the 1960s with the rise of jet travel, but liners ranging from cruise ships to refrigerated cargo ships continued to sail.

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ship
      one of the two principal types of merchant ship as classified by operating method; the other is the tramp steamer. A liner operates on a regular schedule of designated ports, carrying whatever cargo and passengers are available on the date of sailing. The first liners were operated in the North Atlantic, notably by Samuel Cunard of Britain, beginning in 1840. Cunard liners continued to be leaders, though soon joined by French, German, U.S., and other ships, subsidized by their national governments and competing in size, speed, and passenger accommodations. The heyday of the ocean liner lasted from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. Among the most famous were the “Mauretania,” (Mauretania) sister ship of the ill-fated “Lusitania” and for 23 years holder of the blue ribbon for transatlantic speed; the “Aquitania,” also a Cunarder, the last four-funnelled vessel; the German “Vaterland,” seized in New York in 1917 and renamed “Leviathan,” for many years the largest ship afloat; the 80,000-ton “Queen Mary” and “Queen Elizabeth,” (Queen Elizabeth) giant Cunarders of the 1940s and 1950s; the French Line's “Normandie,” which set a new transatlantic speed record of just over four days but which was destroyed by a fire in New York harbour in 1942; and the “United States,” which set a new transatlantic record of three days, ten hours, averaging 35 knots, or 41 land miles per hour, in 1952.

      The reign of the transatlantic liners as glamour ships of the world was gradually ended by the rise of air travel. A vast fleet of liners, ranging from passenger-cruise vessels to refrigerated cargo ships, continued to cover the world.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ocean-Liner — Ocean|li|ner, Ocean Li|ner [ oʊʃənla̮inɐ ], der [engl. ocean liner, aus ocean = Ozean u. liner, ↑ Liner (1)]: ↑ Liner (1). * * * Ocean Li|ner, (auch:) Ocean|li|ner [ oʊʃənlaɪnə], der; s, [engl. ocean liner, aus ocean = Ozean u. liner, ↑Liner …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Ocean-Liner — Ocean Li|ner, auch Ocean|li|ner der; s, <aus engl. ocean liner »Überseeschiff«> svw. ↑Liner …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • Ocean liner — The Queen Mary (1936) is one of the last surviving ocean liners. An ocean liner is a ship designed to transport people from one seaport to another along regular long distance maritime routes according to a schedule. Liners may also carry cargo or …   Wikipedia

  • ocean liner — noun a large commercial ship (especially one that carries passengers on a regular schedule) • Syn: ↑liner • Hypernyms: ↑passenger ship • Hyponyms: ↑cabin liner, ↑cargo liner, ↑cruise ship, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • ocean liner — noun a narrow beam passenger ship designed for high speed trans oceanic travel See Also: liner, cruise ship, cruise liner, passenger liner …   Wiktionary

  • ocean liner — (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) n. cruise ship, luxury liner …   English dictionary for students

  • Ocean liner — cliner, a girl …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • ocean liner — Australian Slang cliner, a girl …   English dialects glossary

  • ocean liner — passenger ship, cruise ship …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ocean liner — /oʊʃən ˈlaɪnə/ (say ohshuhn luynuh) noun → cruise ship …   Australian English dictionary


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