Novaya Zemlya


Novaya Zemlya
/noh"veuh yeuh zem'lee ah"/; Russ. /naw"veuh yeuh zyim lyah"/
two large islands in the Arctic Ocean, N of and belonging to the Russian Federation. 35,000 sq. mi. (90,650 sq. km).

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▪ islands, Russia
also spelled  Novaia Zemlia 

      archipelago in northwestern Russia, lying in the Arctic Ocean and separating the Barents and Kara seas.

      Novaya Zemlya (“New Land”) consists of two large islands, Severny (northern) and Yuzhny (southern), aligned for 600 miles (1,000 km) in a southwest-northeast direction, plus several smaller islands. The two major islands are separated by a narrow strait, Matochkin Shar, only about 1 to 1.5 miles (1.6 to 2.4 km) wide. The most southerly point, the island of Kusova Zemlya, is separated from Vaygach Island and the mainland by the Kara Strait.

      Novaya Zemlya, a continuation of the Ural Mountains system, is for the most part mountainous, though the southern portion of Yuzhny Island is merely hilly. The mountains, which rise at most to 5,220 feet (1,590 m), consist of igneous and sedimentary materials, including limestones and slates. More than one-quarter of the land area, especially in the north, is permanently covered by ice, and most of the northern island, as well as part of the southern, lies in the zone of Arctic desert. The climate is severe, and temperature varies from 3° to -8° F (-16° to -22° C) in winter to 36° to 44° F (2° to 7° C) in summer. There are frequent fogs and strong winds. The vegetation in those portions of the islands free from ice is predominantly low-lying tundra, with much swamp, though low bushes are found in sheltered valleys. Lemmings, Arctic foxes, seals, walruses, and occasionally polar bears are found on Novaya Zemlya; a rich bird life abounds in summer. Novaya Zemlya has been known since at least medieval times, though it was not explored until the 18th and 19th centuries. Area 31,900 square miles (82,600 square km).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Novaya Zemlya — [nō̂′vä yä zem lyä′] [Russ, lit., new land] archipelago of two large islands & several small ones in NW Russia, between the Barents & Kara seas: c. 36,000 sq mi (93,240 sq km) …   English World dictionary

  • Novaya Zemlya — For the Russian film, see Novaya Zemlya (film). Novaya Zemlya …   Wikipedia

  • Nóvaya Zemlyá — El archipiélago de Nóvaya Zemlyá (en ruso: Новая Земля, Tierra nueva ; anteriormente conocido como Nueva Zembla) consta de dos islas en el Océano Ártico en el norte de Rusia, separadas por el Estrecho de Matochkin y una serie de islas menores.… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Novaya Zemlya —    An archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, Novaya Zemlya (“New Land”) separates the Barents and Kara seas. The island chain, which covers an area of 90,000 square kilometers, is administered by Archangel Oblast. The two main islands Severny… …   Historical Dictionary of the Russian Federation

  • Novaya Zemlya — Sp Naujóji Žẽmė Ap Новая Земля/Novaya Zemlya L ss. Arkties vand., RF Archangelsko sr …   Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

  • Novaya Zemlya — geographical name two islands NE Russia in Europe in Arctic Ocean between Barents Sea & Kara Sea area 31,382 square miles (81,279 square kilometers), population 400 …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Novaya Zemlya — NASA Bild von Nowaja Semlja Nowaja Semlja (russisch Новая Земля/Nowaja Semlja, „neues Land“) ist eine russische Doppelinsel, die westlich der innereurasischen Grenze im Nordpolarmeer liegt und zu Europa gezählt wird …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Novaya Zemlya — noun An archipelago in the Arctic Ocean in the north of Russia, administered by Arkhangelsk oblast …   Wiktionary

  • Novaya Zemlya —    Russian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean between the Barents and Kara seas. Already during the Middle Ages, it was being explored because of the islands’wealth of fur bearing animals. It acquired fame as the overwintering place in 1596–1597 of… …   Historical Dictionary of the Netherlands

  • Novaya Zemlya —    see superior mirage …   Dictionary of Hallucinations


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