Newfoundland


Newfoundland
/nooh"feuhn leuhnd, -land', -feuhnd-, nyooh"-; nooh fownd"leuhnd, nyooh-/, n.
1. a large island in E Canada. 42,734 sq. mi. (110,680 sq. km).
2. a province in E Canada, composed of Newfoundland island and Labrador. 557,725; 155,364 sq. mi. (402,390 sq. km). Cap.: St. John's.
3. one of a breed of large, powerful dogs having a dense, oily, usually black coat, raised originally in Newfoundland.

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Dog breed developed in Newfoundland, possibly from crosses between native dogs and the Great Pyrenees dogs that Basque fishermen introduced into North America in the 17th century.

Noted for sea rescues, the gentle, patient Newfoundland stands 26–28 in. (66–71 cm) and weighs 110–150 lbs (50–68 kg). Powerful hindquarters, a large lung capacity, large webbed feet, and a heavy, oily coat enable it to swim in cold waters. It has also been used as a watchdog and draft animal. The typical Newfoundland is solid black; the Landseer Newfoundland is usually black and white.

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▪ breed of dog
 breed of working dog developed in Newfoundland, possibly from crosses between native dogs and the Great Pyrenees dogs taken to North America by Basque fishermen in the 17th century. Noted for rescuing persons from the sea, the Newfoundland is a huge, characteristically gentle and patient dog standing 26 to 28 inches (66 to 71 cm) and weighing 100 to 150 pounds (45 to 68 kg). Powerful hindquarters, a large lung capacity, large webbed feet, and a heavy, oily coat contribute to the dog's ability to swim and to withstand cold waters. In addition to performing rescue work, the Newfoundland has served as a watchdog and companion and as a draft animal. The typical Newfoundland is solid black, brown, or gray; the Landseer Newfoundland, named for Sir Edwin Landseer (Landseer, Sir Edwin), the artist who painted it, is usually black and white.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Newfoundland — • Located in Canada Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Newfoundland     Newfoundland     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Newfoundland — New found*land (?, often ?), prop. n. 1. An island on the coast of British North America, famed for the fishing grounds in its vicinity. [1913 Webster] 2. A Newfoundland dog. Tennyson. [1913 Webster] {Newfoundland dog} (Zo[ o]l.), a breed of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Newfoundland —   [ njuːfəndlənd, auch njuː faʊndlənd], deutsch Neufụndland, Provinz im Osten Kanadas, 404 212 km2, (1999) 541 000 Einwohner, fast ausschließlich britischer Abstammung. Hauptstadt und größte Stadt ist Saint John s. Die Provinz besteht aus der… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Newfoundland — → Terranova. Saint John s Newfoundland → San Juan de Terranova …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

  • Newfoundland — ► NOUN ▪ a dog of a very large breed with a thick coarse coat. ORIGIN named after Newfoundland in Canada …   English terms dictionary

  • Newfoundland — Newfoundland1 [no͞o′fənd lənd, no͞o′fəndland΄; nyo͞o′fənd lənd, nyo͞o′fənd land΄; no͞o found′lənd, no͞o found′land΄; nyo͞o found′lənd, nyo͞ofound′land΄] n. [after NEWFOUNDLAND2] any of a breed of large, muscular dog with a long, straight, often… …   English World dictionary

  • Newfoundland — (spr. njūfaundländ), s. Neufundland …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Newfoundland — er en ø på 110.000 kvadratkilometer …   Danske encyklopædi

  • Newfoundland — 1585, from NEWFOUND (Cf. newfound) + LAND (Cf. land) (n.). In reference to a type of dog, from 1773. Related: Newfoundlander. Colloquial shortening Newfie for the inhabitants or the place is recorded from 1942 …   Etymology dictionary


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