neogrammarian


neogrammarian
/nee'oh greuh mair"ee euhn/, Ling.
n.
1. a member of the Junggrammatiker.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the Junggrammatiker.
[1880-85; trans. of G Junggrammatiker]

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▪ German scholar

      any of a group of German scholars that arose around 1875; their chief tenet concerning language change was that sound laws have no exceptions. This principle was very controversial because there seemed to be several irregularities in language change not accounted for by the sound laws, such as Grimm's law (q.v.), that had been discovered by that time. In 1875, however, the Danish linguist Karl Verner (Verner, Karl) explained the apparent exceptions to Grimm's law; his formulation of the principle governing those exceptions is known as Verner's law (q.v.). Subsequently, many other important sound laws were discovered and formulated to account for other apparent exceptions, and, by the end of the 19th century, the hypothesis of the regularity of sound change had been generally accepted.

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Universalium. 2010.

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