musical


musical
musically, adv.musicality, musicalness, n.
/myooh"zi keuhl/, adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or producing music: a musical instrument.
2. of the nature of or resembling music; melodious; harmonious.
3. fond of or skilled in music.
4. set to or accompanied by music: a musical entertainment.
n.
5. Also called musical comedy. a play or motion picture in which the story line is interspersed with or developed by songs, dances, and the like.
[1375-1425; late ME < ML musicalis. See MUSIC, -AL1]
Syn. 1. tuneful, dulcet, sweet, lyric.

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I

Theatrical production that is characteristically sentimental and amusing in nature, having a simple but distinctive plot and offering music, dancing, and dialogue.

Its roots can be traced to 18th-and 19th-century genres such as ballad opera, singspiel, and opéra comique. The Black Crook (1866), often called the first musical comedy, attracted patrons of opera and serious drama as well as those of burlesque shows. European composers such as Sigmund Romberg brought to the U.S. a form of operetta that was the generic source for musical comedy. George M. Cohan ushered in the genre's heyday, and in the 1920s and '30s it entered its richest period with the works of Jerome Kern, George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, and Oscar Hammerstein. Kern and Hammerstein's Show Boat (1927) was perhaps the first musical to employ music thoroughly integrated with the narrative. The genre flourished in the 1950s with works by composers such as Leonard Bernstein, but it began to decline in the late 1960s, by which time musicals had begun to diverge in many different directions, incorporating elements such as rock music, operatic styling, extravagant lighting and staging, social comment, nostalgia, and pure spectacle. Later notable musical composers included Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Webber.
II
(as used in expressions)
Musical Instrument Digital Interface

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▪ narrative genre
also called  musical comedy 

      theatrical production that is characteristically sentimental and amusing in nature, with a simple but distinctive plot, and offering music, dancing, and dialogue.

      The antecedents of the musical can be traced to a number of 19th-century forms of entertainment including the music hall, comic opera, burlesque, vaudeville, variety shows, pantomime, and the minstrel show. These early entertainments blended the traditions of French ballet, acrobatics, and dramatic interludes. In September 1866 the first musical comedy, The Black Crook, opened in New York City. It was later described as a combination of French Romantic ballet and German melodrama, and it attracted patrons of opera and serious drama, as well as those of burlesque shows. In the late 1890s the British showman and entrepreneur George Edwardes brought his London Gaiety Girls to New York City, calling his production musical comedy to distinguish it from his previous burlesques.

      Much of American popular music of the first decades of the 20th century was written by European immigrants, such as Victor Herbert, Rudolf Friml, and Sigmund Romberg (Romberg, Sigmund). They brought a form of operetta to the United States that was, in every sense, the generic source for musical comedy; it was sentimental and melodious and established a tradition of the play based on musical numbers and songs. Romberg's works, such as The Student Prince (1924) and The Desert Song (1926), were also made into successful motion pictures. George M. Cohan (Cohan, George M.) ushered in the heyday of musical comedy with his productions; they introduced such memorable songs as “You're a Grand Old Flag,” “Give My Regards to Broadway,” and “Over There.”

      During the 1920s and '30s, musical comedy entered its richest period. Jerome Kern (Kern, Jerome) working with Guy Bolton and P.G. Wodehouse, wrote a number of outstanding comedies. George and Ira Gershwin (Gershwin, George) teamed up to write Oh, Kay! (1926), Funny Face (1927), Strike Up the Band (1930), and others. Cole Porter wrote timeless and sophisticated compositions for such musicals as Anything Goes (1934) and Dubarry Was a Lady (1939). Other notable composers and lyricists of this period were Richard Rodgers (Rodgers, Richard) and Oscar Hammerstein (Hammerstein, Oscar, II) II, Harold Arlen, Jule Styne, and Vincent Youmans.

      The genre had taken a new turn with the production in 1927 of Show Boat (music by Kern, book and lyrics by Hammerstein); it was the first musical to provide a cohesive plot and initiate the use of music that was integral to the narrative, a practice that did not fully take hold until the 1940s. Based on a novel by Edna Ferber, the musical presented a serious drama based on American themes incorporating music that was derived from American folk melodies and spirituals.

 Later musicals that were as tightly constructed as Show Boat were Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma! (1943), Carousel (1945), and South Pacific (1949). Alan Jay Lerner (Lerner, Alan Jay) and Frederick Loewe (Loewe, Frederick) also wrote a number of highly successful musicals, notably Brigadoon (1947) and My Fair Lady (1956). They also collaborated on the motion-picture musical Gigi (1958), and four of their theatrical works were later made into motion pictures. Leonard Bernstein (Bernstein, Leonard) wrote West Side Story (1957, with Stephen Sondheim (Sondheim, Stephen)), a conversion of the setting and elements of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to mid-20th-century New York City.

 Musicals as they were known from the 1930s to the 1950s began to decline in the late 1960s. By then, musicals had begun to diverge in many different directions: rock and roll, operatic styling, extravagant lighting and staging, social comment, nostalgia, pure spectacle. The first notable example of the rock musical was Hair (1967), which found its social dissent in a combination of loud music, stroboscopic lighting, youthful irreverence, and nudity. In a few cases, rock music was combined with biblical stories, as in Godspell (1971) by Stephen Swartz and Jesus Christ Superstar (1971) by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Other notable later musicals include Stephen Sondheim's Company (1970) and Sweeney Todd (1979), Marvin Hamlisch and Edward Kleban's A Chorus Line (1975), Lloyd Webber's Evita (1978), Cats (1981), and The Phantom of the Opera (1986); and The Lion King (1997), with music by Elton John (John, Sir Elton) and lyrics by Tim Rice.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • musical — musical, ale, aux [ myzikal, o ] adj. • 1380; de musique 1 ♦ Qui est propre, appartient à la musique. Son musical. Notation musicale. « Swann tenait les motifs musicaux pour de véritables idées » (Proust). ♢ Où il y a de la musique; qui concerne… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Musical — is the adjective form of music. It may also refer to: MusicAL: Albanian Television channel which broadcasts Albanian folk music Musical artist Musical composer Musical composition, an original piece of music, the structure of a musical piece, or… …   Wikipedia

  • Musical — Mu sic*al, a. [Cf. F. musical.] Of or pertaining to music; having the qualities of music; or the power of producing music; devoted to music; melodious; harmonious; as, musical proportion; a musical voice; musical instruments; a musical sentence;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • musical — 1. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a la música. 2. m. Género teatral o cinematográfico de origen angloamericano, en que la acción se desarrolla con partes cantadas y bailadas. U. t. c. adj.) ☛ V. acento musical, cadena musical, comedia musical,… …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • musical — adjetivo 1. De la música: escala musical, instrumento musical, espectáculo musical. velada musical. 2. Que es agradable al oído: voz musical, sonido musical. Tiene una entonación muy musical. adjetivo,sustantivo masculino 1 …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • Musical — Sn std. (20. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus am. e. musical, Kurzform von musical comedy musikalisches Lustspiel . Hat zu analogischen (Scherz )Bildungen wie Grusical geführt.    Ebenso nndl. musical, ne. musical, nfrz. musical, nschw. musikal,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Musical — Mu sic*al, n. 1. Music. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] To fetch home May with their musical. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. A social entertainment of which music is the leading feature; a musical party. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 3. A drama in which music and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • musical — [myo͞o′zi kəl] adj. [ME < ML musicalis < L musica] 1. of or for the creation, production, or performance of music 2. having the nature of music; melodious or harmonious 3. fond of, sensitive to, or skilled in music 4. set to music;… …   English World dictionary

  • musical — musical, ale (mu zi kal, ka l ) adj. Qui a rapport à la musique. Il a l oreille musicale. Soirée musicale. L art musical. Caractères musicaux.    Gazette musicale, Art musical, nom de journaux de musique.    Terme de médecine. Bruits musicaux,… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • musical — MUSICÁL s. comedie muzicală. Trimis de siveco, 05.08.2004. Sursa: Sinonime  MUSICÁL s.n. v. muzical. Trimis de LauraGellner, 13.09.2007. Sursa: DN  MUSICAL [MÜ ZI CĂL] s. n. gen de spectacol realizat prin prelucrarea unor tradiţii ale operetei… …   Dicționar Român

  • musical — Musical, [music]ale. adj. Harmonieux. Ton Musical. cet air est bien Musical. instrument. fort Musical …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française


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