mulberry


mulberry
/mul"ber'ee, -beuh ree/, n., pl. mulberries.
1. the edible, berrylike collective fruit of any tree of the genus Morus.
2. a tree of this genus, as M. rubra (red mulberry or American mulberry) bearing dark-purple fruit, M. nigra (black mulberry) bearing dark-colored fruit, or M. alba (white mulberry) bearing nearly white fruit and having leaves used as food for silkworms. Cf. mulberry family.
[1225-75; ME mulberie, dissimilated var. of murberie, OE morberie, equiv. to mor- ( < L morum mulberry) + berie BERRY]

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▪ artificial harbours, World War II
 either of two artificial harbours designed and constructed by the British in World War II to facilitate the unloading of supply ships off the coast of Normandy, France, immediately following the invasion of Europe on D-Day, June 6, 1944. One harbour, known as Mulberry A, was constructed off Saint-Laurent at Omaha Beach in the American sector, and the other, Mulberry B, was built off Arromanches at Gold Beach in the British sector. Each harbour, when fully operational, had the capacity to move 7,000 tons of vehicles and supplies per day from ship to shore.

   Each Mulberry harbour consisted of roughly 6 miles (10 km) of flexible steel roadways (code-named Whales) that floated on steel or concrete pontoons (called Beetles). The roadways terminated at great pierheads, called Spuds, that were jacked up and down on legs which rested on the seafloor. These structures were to be sheltered from the sea by lines of massive sunken caissons (called Phoenixes), lines of scuttled ships (called Gooseberries), and a line of floating breakwaters (called Bombardons). It was estimated that construction of the caissons alone required 330,000 cubic yards (252,000 cubic metres) of concrete, 31,000 tons of steel, and 1.5 million yards (1.4 million metres) of steel shuttering.

      The Mulberry harbours were conceived after the failed amphibious raid on the French port of Dieppe in August 1942. The German defense of the coast of western Europe was built on formidable defenses around ports and port facilities. Because of the strength of these defenses, the Allies had to consider other means to push large quantities of provisions across the beaches in the early stages of an invasion. The British solution to the problem was to bring their own port with them. This solution had the support of Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Churchill, Sir Winston), who in May 1943 wrote the following note:

Piers for use on beaches: They must float up and down with the tide. The anchor problem must be mastered.…Let me have the best solution worked out. Don't argue the matter. The difficulties will argue for themselves.

      With Churchill's support, the artificial harbours received immediate attention, resources, time, and energy.

      The various parts of the Mulberries were fabricated in secrecy in Britain and floated into position immediately after D-Day. Within 12 days of the landing (D-Day plus 12), both harbours were operational. They were intended to provide the primary means for the movement of goods from ship to shore until the port at Cherbourg was captured and opened. However, on June 19 a violent storm began, and by June 22 the American harbour was destroyed. (Parts of the wreckage were used to repair the British harbour.) The Americans had to return to the old way of doing things: bringing landing ships in to shore, grounding them, off-loading the ships, and then refloating them on the next high tide. The British Mulberry supported the Allied armies for 10 months. Two and a half million men, a half million vehicles, and four million tons of supplies landed in Europe through the artificial harbour at Arromanches. Remains of the structure can be seen to this day near the Musée du Débarquement.

Adrian R. Lewis

Additional Reading
The development and employment of the Mulberry artificial harbours is described in Guy Hartcup, Code Name Mulberry: The Planning, Building, and Operation of the Normandy Harbours (1977).

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Mulberry — Mul ber*ry, n.; pl. {Mulberries}. [OE. moolbery, murberie, AS. murberie, where the first part is fr. L. morum mulberry; cf. Gr. ?, ?. Cf. {Murrey}, {Sycamore}.] 1. (Bot.) The berry or fruit of any tree of the genus {Morus}; also, the tree itself …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mulberry — (n.) late 14c., developed from 13c. morberie, or cognate M.H.G. mul beri (alteration by dissimilation of O.H.G. mur beri, Mod.Ger. Maulbeere); both from L. morum mulberry, blackberry, + O.E. berie, O.H.G. beri berry. The Latin word probably is… …   Etymology dictionary

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