mouse


mouse
mouselike, adj.
n. /mows/; v. /mowz/, n., pl. mice /muys/, v., moused, mousing.
n.
1. any of numerous small Old World rodents of the family Muridae, esp. of the genus Mus, introduced widely in other parts of the world.
2. any similar small animal of various rodent and marsupial families.
3. a quiet, timid person.
4. Computers. a palm-sized, button-operated device that can be slid on wheels or ball bearings over a desktop to move the cursor on a CRT to any position, or slid over a drawing in order to recreate the drawing on a CRT. Cf. joystick (def. 2).
5. Informal. a swelling under the eye, caused by a blow or blows; black eye.
6. Slang. a girl or woman.
v.t.
7. to hunt out, as a cat hunts out mice.
8. Naut. to secure with a mousing.
v.i.
9. to hunt for or catch mice.
10. to prowl about, as if in search of something: The burglar moused about for valuables.
11. to seek or search stealthily or watchfully, as if for prey.
[bef. 900; ME mous (pl. mis), OE mus (pl. mys); c. G Maus, ON mus, L mus, Gk mys]

* * *

I
Any of many species (family Muridae) of small, scampering rodents.

They are distinguished from rats principally by their smaller size. Mice are basically Asian in origin, but species have been introduced worldwide. Species in other rodent families (e.g., deer mouse, pocket mouse) are called mice without scientific basis. Mice eat grains, roots, fruit, grass, and insects. They can become pests but are mostly beneficial; they are the main prey of most furbearers and of predators that might otherwise take more valuable prey. The white laboratory mouse is a form of house mouse. See also field mouse.
II
Hand-controlled electromechanical device for interacting with a digital computer that has a graphical user interface.

The mouse can be moved around on a flat surface to control the movement of a cursor on the computer display screen. Equipped with one or more buttons, it can be used to select text, activate programs, or move items around the screen by quickly pressing and releasing one of the buttons ("clicking") or by keeping a button depressed while moving the device ("clicking and dragging").
III
(as used in expressions)
white footed mouse

* * *

▪ computer device
 hand-controlled electromechanical device for interacting with a digital computer that has a graphical user interface. The mouse can be moved around on a flat surface to control the movement of a cursor on the computer display screen. Equipped with one or more buttons, it can be used to select text, activate programs, or move items around the screen by quickly pressing and releasing one of the buttons (“clicking”) or by keeping a button depressed while moving the device (“clicking and dragging”).

▪ rodent genus
Introduction
 the common name generally but imprecisely applied to rodents found throughout the world with bodies less than about 12 cm (5 inches) long. In a scientific context, mouse refers to any of the 38 species in the genus Mus, which is the Latin word for mouse. The house mouse (Mus musculus), native to Central Asia, has established itself with human populations in many other parts of the world.

      All rodents with a mouselike or ratlike body, regardless of body size or diagnostic traits, were described as species of Mus between 1758 and the late 1800s. Subsequent study shifted most of those species into many different groups, leaving Mus as a smaller, clearly defined genus with a particular combination of traits. Within the genus there are four distinctive groups: spiny mice (subgenus Pyromys), shrew-mice (subgenus Coelomys), rice field mice and the house mouse (subgenus Mus), and African mice (subgenus Nannomys).

General features
      Mice have a slender body, blunt or tapered muzzle, scantily haired, prominent ears, narrow hind feet with bald soles, and sharp, small claws. The thinly furred tail appears hairless; it may be about as long as the head and body, or it can be much shorter. One of the largest is the flat-haired mouse (M. platythrix) of peninsular India, weighing about 18 grams (0.6 ounce), with a body 10 to 12 cm (4 to 4.7 inches) long and a shorter tail (7 to 8 cm [2.8 to 3.1 inches]). The smallest is probably the pygmy mouse (M. minutoides) of sub-Saharan Africa, weighing 3 to 12 grams (0.11 to 0.42 ounce), with a body 6 to 8 cm (2.3 to 3.1 inches) long and a short tail of 3 to 6 cm (1.2 to 2.3 inches).

      There is considerable variation in fur texture and colour among the species of Mus. At one extreme are the spiny-furred species in the subgenus Pyromys, whose upperparts and undersides are covered with flat, channeled spines nestled in soft underfur (juveniles are not spiny). At the other extreme are the shrew-mice from Sumatra (M. crociduroides) and Java (M. vulcani), whose soft, short, and dense coat appears woolly or velvety. All the other species have a soft or slightly coarse, moderately thick coat with short or long hairs. A colour combination common to many mice is gray to brown upperparts, white underparts, white feet, and a tail that is dark above and white below. Variations of this pattern include upperparts of buff, bluish gray, blackish gray, reddish brown, or chocolate brown, with underparts ranging from white to various shades of gray, sometimes tinged with silver or buff. The feet may be white or the same colour as the upperparts, and the tail may be bicoloured or uniformly dark gray to dark brown.

Natural history
      Mice in their natural habitats are primarily nocturnal, although some will occasionally forage during the day. They are ground dwellers, although some species are also agile climbers and leapers as well as capable swimmers. A few are specialized burrowers rarely seen above ground. Most species, especially those living in savannas and grasslands, excavate burrows (burrowing) and chambers in which they build globular nests of dry vegetation. In an intact ecosystem, species of Mus, along with other small-bodied rodents, are preyed upon, sometimes to an appreciable degree, by reptiles, mammals, and birds (especially owls).

      The simple but effective excavation technique of mice is exemplified by the Ryukyu (Ryukyu Islands) mouse (M. caroli). This mouse loosens soil with its incisor teeth, carrying a load of debris in its mouth and piling it outside the burrow entrance or sometimes stacking loose soil inside the burrow and then pushing the pile out with its hind feet. In the diked rice fields of Thailand, small piles of soil below holes in the dike signal the presence of Ryukyu mice. Each hole is the opening to a tunnel extending upward to a nest chamber above water level, then to another opening on the other side of the dike. Forest species may also burrow, but most of them construct nests in rock crevices or beneath rotting tree trunks and brush piles on the forest floor. The gray-bellied pygmy mouse (M. triton) of sub-Saharan Africa, for example, apparently does not burrow but uses pathways made by larger rodents.

 Diet varies among species. Outdoors the house mouse consumes seeds and insects; indoors it eats nearly anything digestible. Most other species eat a combination of plant parts (especially seeds), insects, and other invertebrates. Stomachs of gray-bellied pygmy mice caught in East Africa, for example, contained plant parts, pieces of bark, insects (mostly adult beetles), and worms.

      Depending upon the species and geographic region, mice may breed throughout the year or only during the wet seasons in southern latitudes and from spring to fall in northern latitudes. Except for the house mouse, which can produce up to 14 litters per year (1 to 12 offspring per litter), there is little information about the reproductive biology of most species. In the deserts of India, the little Indian field mouse (M. booduga) bears from 1 to 13 young per litter and breeds throughout the year. In Southeast Asia, the fawn-coloured mouse (M. cervicolor) has been reported to produce litters of two to six young in July and December. In East Africa, the pygmy mouse breeds during the wet seasons from April to June and September to December and bear litters of two to eight young.

Geographic distribution and habitat
      All species of Mus are native to Eurasia and Africa, where they range from lowlands to mountaintops. The five species in the subgenus Pyromys are found in Sri Lanka, India, and mainland Southeast Asia. Much of their range originally consisted of open grasslands or grassy patches in forests. Shortridge's mouse (M. shortridgei), for example, has been found living in tall grasses and pygmy bamboo growing among teak forests in Thailand.

      The five species in the subgenus Coelomys are restricted to tropical evergreen lowland and mountain forests of Sri Lanka, southern India, mainland Southeast Asia, Sumatra, and Java. Beneath the forest understory, they live in moist or cool environments, often near streams and other water sources, or in wet, mossy habitats at high elevations. Little is known about their behaviour or ecology. They have tapered, shrewlike muzzles and small eyes. The dark brown fur is woolly or velvety in three of the species and somewhat spiny in the other two. Their diet probably consists mostly of invertebrates, which they locate by poking their noses through moist leaf litter and moss covering the forest floor.

      The nine members of the subgenus Mus are found throughout Eurasia and North Africa in a variety of habitats: scantily vegetated deserts, steppes, rocky slopes, open grasslands and grassy patches in tropical deciduous forests (tropical rainforest), fallow fields and croplands at northern latitudes, and rice fields in the Asian tropics. Four of these species, including the house mouse, have dispersed beyond their natural ranges as a result of human settlement. The earth-coloured mouse (M. terricolor) is native to peninsular India, Nepal, and Pakistan, but it has been introduced into northern Sumatra. The fawn-coloured mouse has a natural distribution throughout mainland Southeast Asia and southern China but also inhabits rice fields on Sumatra and Java, where it was likely introduced. The Ryukyu mouse ranges throughout Southeast Asia, including Taiwan and the Ryukyu Islands, where it lives in rice fields and other grassy agricultural land; humans apparently introduced this species into the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java, and east of the continental margin on Flores Island, where it inhabits rice fields.

      Some species are apparently restricted to particular habitats, such as the gray-bellied pygmy mouse (M. triton), which lives only in grassland, heath, and wet scrub, but others are more adaptable. Habitats of the pygmy mouse, for example, include open sandy ground, savannas, forests, and sometimes houses. This subgenus contains the most efficient burrowers: Thomas's pygmy mouse (M. sorella) and its relatives have protruding upper incisors, longer claws than most species of Mus, and shorter tails relative to body length. They are rarely seen and are caught only by being dug out of their burrows.

      The 19 species of subgenus Nannomys live throughout sub-Saharan Africa in many different habitats: sandy and stony deserts, open grasslands, heath, scrub, dry and wet savannas, lowland to montane tropical forests, swamp margins, and cultivated areas.

Classification and evolutionary history
      Species of Mus belong to the subfamily of Old World rats and mice (Murinae) in the family Muridae within the order Rodentia (rodent). Their closest living relative is the stripe-backed mouse (Muriculus imberbis) endemic to the mountains of Ethiopia. The evolutionary history of Mus extends 6 million years to the Late Miocene Epoch in Asia, 3 million to 4 million years to the Pliocene Epoch in Africa and Europe, and 10,000 to 1.8 million years to the Pleistocene Epoch in the Mediterranean region. Based upon study of living and fossil species, researchers speculate that Mus originated in central Asia more than 11 million years ago, evolved into the many fossil and living Asian species, entered Africa around 5 million years ago (where it formed the ancestral stock of fossil and living Nannomys species), and finally reached Europe and the Mediterranean somewhat later.

Guy Musser

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mouse — (mous), n.; pl. {Mice} (m[imac]s). [OE. mous, mus, AS. m[=u]s, pl. m[=y]s; akin to D. muis, G. maus, OHG. & Icel. m[=u]s, Dan. muus, Sw. mus, Russ. muishe, L. mus, Gr. my^s, Skr. m[=u]sh mouse, mush to steal. [root]277. Cf. {Muscle}, {Musk}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mouse — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Un ejemplo de ratón o mouse, con cable y rueda …   Wikipedia Español

  • MOUSE — was founded in 1997 by entrepreneur Andrew Rasiej and Founding Executive Director Sarah Holloway. Along with leaders from the high tech community in New York City, MOUSE spearheaded the process of wiring public schools for Internet access in New… …   Wikipedia

  • mouse — [maʊs] noun mouses PLURALFORM or mice [maɪs] [countable] COMPUTING a small object connected to a computer by a wire, which you move around on a flat surface using your hand. You press the buttons to ma …   Financial and business terms

  • mouse — W3S2 [maus] n [: Old English; Origin: mus] 1.) plural mice [maıs] a small furry animal with a pointed nose and a long tail that lives in people s houses or in fields ▪ The cat laid a dead mouse at my feet. ▪ a field mouse ↑mousemat, ↑mouse 2.) …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • mouse — [ maus ] (plural mice [ maıs ] ) noun count ** 1. ) a small furry animal with a long tail: The cat s caught another mouse. 2. ) (plural mouses or mice) a small object that you move in order to do things on a computer screen. When you press on a… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • MOUSE — (Heb. עַכְבָּר, akhbar), small rodent enumerated in the Bible with the rat and five reptiles ( creeping things ). It is so classified because as a result of its short legs its belly touches the ground as it walks. Isaiah (66:17) vehemently… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Mouse — Mouse, v. t. 1. To tear, as a cat devours a mouse. [Obs.] [Death] mousing the flesh of men. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To furnish with a mouse; to secure by means of a mousing. See {Mouse}, n., 2. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mouse — steht für: die englische Bezeichnung für ein Computereingabegerät, siehe Maus (Computer) eine Manga Serie, siehe Mouse (Manga) eine Programmiersprache, siehe Mouse (Programmiersprache) ein US amerikanischer Produzent, siehe Mouse (Produzent) ein… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • mouse — [mous; ] for v., also [ mouz] n. pl. mice [ME mous < OE mus, akin to Ger maus < IE * mūs, a mouse > Gr mys, L mus, mouse & musculus,MUSCLE] 1. any of a large number of small, widespread rodents belonging to various families and having… …   English World dictionary

  • MOUSE — (jap. マウス mausu) ist eine japanische Manga Serie von Satoru Akahori (Story) und Hiroshi Itaba (Zeichnungen), die auch als Anime umgesetzt wurde. Sie lässt sich dem Seinen Genre zuordnen und hat erotische Inhalte wie Fanservice und Hardcore BDSM… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.