Mount Vernon


Mount Vernon
1. the home and tomb of George Washington in NE Virginia, on the Potomac, 15 mi. (24 km) below Washington, D.C.
2. a city in SE New York, near New York City. 66,713.
3. a city in S Illinois. 16,995.
4. a city in central Ohio. 14,380.
5. a town in NW Washington. 13,009.

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Home and burial place of George Washington.

It is located in northern Virginia, U.S., on the Potomac River near Washington, D.C. The estate was inherited by Washington in 1751. Near the 18th-century Georgian mansion is a plain brick tomb, built at Washington's direction, that holds his and his wife's remains. After the U.S. government declined to buy it, in 1858 the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union raised $200,000 and purchased the house and 200 acres (81 hectares) of the estate; the association still maintains the site.

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      city, seat (1819) of Jefferson county, southern Illinois, U.S. Lying at the junction of two interstate highways, Mount Vernon is located about 80 miles (130 km) southeast of St. Louis (Saint Louis), Missouri. Founded in 1819, it was initially to be named Mount Pleasant but, after intense debate, was named instead for George Washington (Washington, George)'s home (see Mount Vernon) in Virginia. The Illinois Supreme Court was located in Mount Vernon (1856–96), and Abraham Lincoln (Lincoln, Abraham) argued and won a tax case there in 1859. A railway link (1872) spurred industrial development, with the establishment of mills, foundries, and breweries. In 1888 Mount Vernon was devastated by a tornado that destroyed some 500 buildings, but the city was quickly rebuilt. During the first half of the 20th century, Mount Vernon was a major producer of railroad cars. The city is now an agricultural (soybeans) and distribution centre, and coal mining, oil production, and tire manufacturing contribute to the local economy. Local varieties of wines are also produced. Cedarhurst, an arts centre sited on 85 acres (35 hectares), contains an art museum, a sculpture park, and nature trails and hosts music and theatre productions. The city also features a historical village with log cabins, a blacksmith's shop, and a log jail. Rend Lake (community) College (1967) is in nearby Ina. Rend Lake, Wayne Fitzgerrell State Park, and a state fish and wildlife area are south of the city. Inc. town, 1837; city, 1872. Pop. (1990) 16,988; (2000) 16,269.

      city, Westchester county, New York, U.S., situated on the Bronx and Hutchinson rivers, just north of the Bronx, New York City. It was settled in 1664 near the site where religious dissenter Anne Hutchinson (Hutchinson, Anne) (banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony) was killed in 1643 by Indians. It became a farm village (considered part of Eastchester township), the meeting house of which was the scene of the election of Lewis Morris to the provincial assembly in 1733. Colonial governor William Cosby's persistent opposition to Morris was reported by the antigovernment newspaper of John Peter Zenger (Zenger, John Peter), whose subsequent trial for seditious libel was the first major victory for the principle of freedom of the press in the American colonies. Mount Vernon was the scene of several battles during the American Revolution, including a delaying action by Glover's Brigade on October 18, 1776, which probably saved General George Washington (Washington, George)'s army from defeat by General William Howe (Howe, William Howe, 5th Viscount). The village's growth was assured when the Industrial Home Association, a cooperative group seeking relief from high New York City rents, purchased land for home sites there in the early 1850s and named the community for Washington's home. Diversified industrial development includes the manufacture of jewelry, automatic fire sprinklers, and packaging materials. A dredged portion of the Hutchinson River serves as a port.

      St. Paul's Church (1763), used during the Revolution as a British military hospital, was dedicated a national historic site in 1943. Inc. village, 1853; city, 1892. Pop. (1990) 67,153; (2000) 68,381.

      city, seat (1808) of Knox county, central Ohio, U.S. It lies along the Kokosing River, about 45 miles (70 km) northeast of Columbus. John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed), the orchardist, owned several lots in the original settlement that was laid out in 1805. The settlement was incorporated as a city in the same year and named for its location on a height by the river (then called Vernon but now known by its Native American name). Mount Vernon is the centre for an area of general farming (livestock, corn [maize], soybeans) and of oil and natural gas production. Livestock auctions are held regularly in the city. Manufactures include electrical transmission equipment, automotive parts, conveyor systems, compressors, and paper products. Daniel Decatur Emmett (Emmett, Daniel Decatur), the composer of “Dixie” and other well-known songs, was born and died in Mount Vernon, and Mary Ann Bickerdyke, a pioneering war nurse in the service of the Union armies during the American Civil War, was born on a nearby farm. Mount Vernon Nazarene University was founded in 1968, and Kenyon College (1824) is in nearby Gambier. The Woodward Opera House (1851), one of the oldest theatres in the United States, is located in the city's downtown. Pop. (2000) 14,375; (2005 est.) 16,000.

▪ historical site, Virginia, United States
 home and burial place of George Washington (Washington, George), in Fairfax county, Virginia, U.S., overlooking the Potomac River, 15 miles (24 km) south of Washington, D.C. (District of Columbia) The 18th-century two-story Georgian (Georgian style) mansion is built of wood, but the siding is of wide, thick boards paneled so as to give the appearance of cut and dressed stonework. The rooms have been restored as they were when occupied by Washington and his family; most of the furniture pieces on the first floor and all of those in Washington's bedchamber are originals. Additional Washington relics are in a separate museum building.

 From both ends of the house, a curved colonnade leads to a row of outbuildings. A spacious lawn surrounds the mansion, with shaded drives, walks, and gardens. A short distance southwest of the mansion is a plain brick tomb built at Washington's direction on a site chosen by himself. It contains his remains and those of his wife and of several members of the family (all removed there from the old family vault in 1831).

 The estate, originally called Little Hunting Creek Plantation, consisted of about 5,000 acres (2,000 hectares). It descended by inheritance from John Washington, the first of the family in America, to his son Lawrence, who in turn devised it to his daughter Mildred. From Mildred it was purchased in 1726 by her brother Augustine, George Washington's father; and in 1735, when George was three years old, the family moved there from “Wakefield” (a site now occupied by the George Washington Birthplace National Monument). The central part of the house was probably built during that time. In 1740, Augustine conveyed the plantation to his son Lawrence, elder half brother of George, and Lawrence settled there three years later. He renamed the plantation Mount Vernon in honour of Admiral Edward Vernon, under whom he had served in the Caribbean. Young George, after his father's death in 1743, spent part of his youth at Mount Vernon with Lawrence.

      After Lawrence's death in 1752, George inherited the property; but because of military service he did not take up residence until January 1759, when he married Martha (Dandridge) Custis. During the next 15 years he enlarged the house, added smaller wings, erected several of the outbuildings, and expanded the gardens. He also tried crop rotation and other agricultural experiments on the plantation. Again called into public service, it was not until December 1783, when he tendered his resignation to Congress as commander in chief of the Continental Army, that he again settled at Mount Vernon. But in 1789 his plantation life was again interrupted when he became the first president of the United States. From 1797 until his death (December 14, 1799) he lived at Mount Vernon. At his death, a life interest in the place went to his widow. The estate then passed to his nephew, Bushrod Washington, and from Bushrod it descended to John Augustine Washington, Jr., who was authorized by will to sell it to the U.S. government, which refused to buy the property.

      In 1853 Ann Pamela Cunningham of South Carolina organized the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union, which raised about $200,000 and purchased the house and 200 acres (80 hectares) of the original estate in 1858. The association, under its charter, was bound to restore and maintain the estate, which was designated a national registered historic landmark; the state of Virginia agreed to exempt the estate from taxation so long as these terms were fulfilled. Washington's home, gardens, family cemetery, and outbuildings comprise what is considered America's first historical tourist attraction.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Mount Vernon, AL — U.S. town in Alabama Population (2000): 844 Housing Units (2000): 395 Land area (2000): 1.890838 sq. miles (4.897247 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.010399 sq. miles (0.026932 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.901237 sq. miles (4.924179 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, AR — U.S. city in Arkansas Population (2000): 144 Housing Units (2000): 68 Land area (2000): 1.000426 sq. miles (2.591092 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.000426 sq. miles (2.591092 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, GA — U.S. city in Georgia Population (2000): 2082 Housing Units (2000): 840 Land area (2000): 4.119688 sq. miles (10.669942 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 4.119688 sq. miles (10.669942 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, IA — U.S. city in Iowa Population (2000): 3390 Housing Units (2000): 1192 Land area (2000): 3.483918 sq. miles (9.023307 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.006246 sq. miles (0.016176 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.490164 sq. miles (9.039483 sq. km) FIPS code …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, IL — U.S. city in Illinois Population (2000): 16269 Housing Units (2000): 7814 Land area (2000): 11.521257 sq. miles (29.839917 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.098604 sq. miles (0.255382 sq. km) Total area (2000): 11.619861 sq. miles (30.095299 sq. km)… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, IN — U.S. city in Indiana Population (2000): 7478 Housing Units (2000): 3312 Land area (2000): 2.463087 sq. miles (6.379365 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.065909 sq. miles (0.170704 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.528996 sq. miles (6.550069 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, KY — U.S. city in Kentucky Population (2000): 2592 Housing Units (2000): 1241 Land area (2000): 3.175869 sq. miles (8.225462 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.536037 sq. miles (1.388329 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.711906 sq. miles (9.613791 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, MD — U.S. Census Designated Place in Maryland Population (2000): 761 Housing Units (2000): 402 Land area (2000): 13.120004 sq. miles (33.980653 sq. km) Water area (2000): 2.796089 sq. miles (7.241837 sq. km) Total area (2000): 15.916093 sq. miles… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mount Vernon, MO — U.S. city in Missouri Population (2000): 4017 Housing Units (2000): 1730 Land area (2000): 3.423449 sq. miles (8.866692 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 3.423449 sq. miles (8.866692 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places