motion


motion
motional, adj.motioner, n.
/moh"sheuhn/, n.
1. the action or process of moving or of changing place or position; movement.
2. power of movement, as of a living body.
3. the manner of moving the body in walking; gait.
4. a bodily movement or change of posture; gesture.
5. a proposal formally made to a deliberative assembly: to make a motion to adjourn.
6. Law. an application made to a court or judge for an order, ruling, or the like.
7. a suggestion or proposal.
8. an inward prompting or impulse; inclination: He will go only of his own motion.
9. Music. melodic progression, as the change of a voice part from one pitch to another.
10. Mach.
a. a piece of mechanism with a particular action or function.
b. the action of such a mechanism.
11. go through the motions, to do something halfheartedly, routinely, or as a formality or façade.
12. in motion, in active operation; moving: The train was already in motion when he tried to board it.
v.t.
13. to direct by a significant motion or gesture, as with the hand: to motion a person to a seat.
v.i.
14. to make a meaningful motion, as with the hand; gesture; signal: to motion to someone to come.
[1350-1400; ME mocio(u)n < L motion- (s. of motio), equiv. to mot(us) (ptp. of movere to MOVE) + -ion- -ION]
Syn. 1. MOTION, MOVE, MOVEMENT refer to change of position in space. MOTION denotes change of position, either considered apart from, or as a characteristic of, something that moves; usually the former, in which case it is often a somewhat technical or scientific term: perpetual motion. The chief uses of MOVE are founded upon the idea of moving a piece, in chess or a similar game, for winning the game, and hence the word denotes any change of position, condition, or circumstances for the accomplishment of some end: a shrewd move to win votes. MOVEMENT is always connected with the person or thing moving, and is usually a definite or particular motion: the movements of a dance. 3. bearing, carriage.

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I
Change in position of a body relative to another body or with respect to a frame of reference or coordinate system.

Motion occurs along a definite path, the nature of which determines the character of the motion. Translational motion occurs if all points in a body have similar paths relative to another body. Rotational motion occurs when any line on a body changes its orientation relative to a line on another body. Motion relative to a moving body, such as motion on a moving train, is called relative motion. Indeed, all motions are relative, but motions relative to the Earth or to any body fixed to the Earth are often assumed to be absolute, as the effects of the Earth's motion are usually negligible. See also Brownian motion; periodic motion; simple harmonic motion; simple motion; uniform circular motion.
II
(as used in expressions)
motion equation of
Newton's laws of motion
Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America

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      in physics, change with time of the position or orientation of a body. Motion along a line or a curve is called translation. Motion that changes the orientation of a body is called rotation. In both cases all points in the body have the same velocity (directed speed) and the same acceleration (time rate of change of velocity). The most general kind of motion combines both translation and rotation.

      All motions are relative to some frame of reference. Saying that a body is at rest, which means that it is not in motion, merely means that it is being described with respect to a frame of reference that is moving together with the body. For example, a body on the surface of the Earth may appear to be at rest, but that is only because the observer is also on the surface of the Earth. The Earth itself, together with both the body and the observer, is moving in its orbit around the Sun and rotating on its own axis at all times. As a rule, the motions of bodies obey Newton's laws of motion. However, motion at speeds close to the speed of light must be treated by using the theory of relativity, and the motion of very small bodies (such as electrons) must be treated by using quantum mechanics.

      in parliamentary rules of order, a procedure by which proposals are submitted for the consideration of deliberative assemblies. If a motion is in order, it then becomes subject to the action of the assembly. See parliamentary procedure.

      In procedural law, a motion is an application to a court or judge for a ruling or order. Generally speaking, a motion is an oral application, as opposed to a petition, which is written.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • motion — mo·tion 1 n [Anglo French, from Latin motion motio movement, from movēre to move] 1: a proposal for action; esp: a formal proposal made in a legislative assembly made a motion to refer the bill to committee 2 a: an application made to a court or… …   Law dictionary

  • motion — [ mosjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIIIe; lat. motio 1 ♦ Vx Action de mouvoir (⇒ impulsion); mouvement. ♢ (sens repris au XXe) Psychan. Motion pulsionnelle : la pulsion en tant que modification psychique (pulsion en acte). 2 ♦ (1775; angl. motion) Mod …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Motion — Mo tion, n. [F., fr. L. motio, fr. movere, motum, to move. See {Move}.] 1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; opposed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Motion — may refer to: Motion (physics), any movement or change in position or place .... Motion (legal), a procedural device in law to bring a limited, contested matter before a court Motion (democracy), a formal step to introduce a matter for… …   Wikipedia

  • motion — n Motion, movement, move, locomotion, stir mean the act or an instance of moving. Motion is the appropriate term in abstract use for the act or process of moving, without regard to what moves or is moved; in philosophical and aesthetic use it is… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • motion — mo‧tion [ˈməʊʆn ǁ ˈmoʊ ] noun [countable] a suggestion that is made formally at a meeting and then decided on by voting: • The motion was carried (= accepted ) by 15 votes to 10. • I d like to propose a motion to move the weekly meetings to… …   Financial and business terms

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. t. 1. To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To propose; to move. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I want friends to motion such a matter. Burton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — [n1] movement, action act, advance, agitation, ambulation, body English*, change, changing, direction, drift, dynamics, flow, fluctuation, flux, full swing*, gesticulation, gesture, high sign*, inclination, kinetics, locomotion, mobility,… …   New thesaurus

  • motion — [mō′shən] n. [ME mocioun < L motio (gen. motionis), a moving < motus, pp. of movere,MOVE] 1. the act or process of moving; passage of a body from one place to another; movement 2. the act of moving the body or any of its parts 3. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Motioned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Motioning}.] 1. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To make proposal; to offer plans. [Obs.] Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012. motion A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken …   Glossary of Bankruptcy


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