moral theology


moral theology
the branch of theology dealing with principles of moral conduct.
[1900-05]

* * *

also called  Christian ethics 

      Christian theological discipline concerned with identifying and elucidating the principles that determine the quality of human behaviour in the light of Christian revelation. It is distinguished from the philosophical discipline of ethics, which relies upon the authority of reason and which can only call upon rational sanctions for moral failure. Moral theology appeals to the authority of revelation, specifically as found in the preaching and activity of Jesus Christ.

      The moral teaching in Christian communities has varied in the different eras, regions, and confessional traditions in which Christianity has been professed. The Roman Catholic tradition has been inclined to emphasize the mediating role of ecclesiastical institutions in its approach to the moral authority of revelation. Protestant churches have often put great emphasis on the direct, or immediate, moral responsibility of the individual before God. The influence of the spiritual director for the moral welfare of the individual Christian has been a significant aspect of Eastern Christianity.

      Moral theology has at times seemed to have been restricted in its scope to a consideration of those thoughts, works, and actions that are viewed as offensive to God and spiritually harmful to human beings—that is, an enumeration of sins. It was thus seen as a negative complement of ascetical and mystical theology, which both presuppose a more positive orientation of the individual toward God. Many moral theologians, however, have believed that it is more faithful to the spirit of the New Testament and of early theology not to separate moral teaching from the religious anthropology that is implicit in the message of the Gospels. This approach has been reflected in the traditional Eastern Christian emphasis on the divinization of man through his association with Jesus Christ and in the Protestant concern with the moral power of justification. Medieval and post-Reformation Roman Catholic moral theology tended to separate moral teaching from dogmatic theology.

      The significance of the relation of moral teaching to divine revelation lies in the problem of determining the nature of the particular “highest good” that characterizes any ethical system. Without such a determination of the nature of this good, one could easily have the impression that morality is simply obedience to a set of rules or laws the observance of which has been labeled, more or less arbitrarily, good. In the light of revelation, sin is seen as a deterioration of the fundamental disposition of a person toward God, rather than as a breaking of rules or laws. virtue is viewed as the habitual capacity of a person to respond freely and consciously to situations in a manner that reflects and intensifies his conformity to Jesus Christ.

      The diverse approaches to moral theology through the centuries have varied greatly in their recourse to logical reasoning and in the degree of their acceptance of general moral principles that are considered universally applicable. Contemporary moral theology must confront a variety of problems, including the scope of individual responsibility in large corporate institutions, the effects of human activities on the natural environment, the demands of social justice, the developments in genetics and other biological sciences, and the use of sophisticated technology in warfare.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Moral Theology — • Limited to those doctrines which discuss the relations of man and his free actions to God and his supernatural end, and propose the means instituted by God for the attainment of that end Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Moral Theology …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Moral theology — Moral Mor al, a. [F., fr. It. moralis, fr. mos, moris, manner, custom, habit, way of life, conduct.] 1. Relating to duty or obligation; pertaining to those intentions and actions of which right and wrong, virtue and vice, are predicated, or to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moral theology — Theology The*ol o*gy, n.; pl. {Theologies}. [L. theologia, Gr. ?; ? God + ? discourse: cf. F. th[ e]ologie. See {Theism}, and {Logic}.] The science of God or of religion; the science which treats of the existence, character, and attributes of God …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Moral theology — is a systematic theological treatment of Christian ethics. It is usually taught on Divinity faculties as a part of the basic curriculum. See also Catholic moral theology External links Moral theology on Catholic Encyclopedia …   Wikipedia

  • moral theology — noun : a branch of theology that treats of morals; also : theology or theological doctrines developed as inferences from moral grounds or reasons * * * the branch of theology dealing with principles of moral conduct. [1900 05] * * * moral… …   Useful english dictionary

  • moral theology — /mɒrəl θiˈɒlədʒi/ (say moruhl thee oluhjee) noun that branch of theology dealing with principles of moral conduct treated with reference to a divine origin …   Australian English dictionary

  • moral theology —    This term (from the Latin mores, meaning customs or morals ) refers to the branch of theology that is concerned with the values, principles, and norms of morally acceptable human conduct. (Compare with ETHICS) …   Glossary of theological terms

  • moral theology —  Моральная теология …   Вестминстерский словарь теологических терминов

  • Moral theology of Rowan Williams — The moral theology of Rowan Williams has had a significant impact on the ongoing debate on Anglican views of homosexuality and has been cited both by opponents and defenders of the gay movement within the Anglican communion. Contents 1 The Body s …   Wikipedia

  • Moral theology of John Paul I — The moral theology of John Paul I has been openly debated and his opinions expressed on Humanae Vitae, artificial insemination and homosexuality have been cited as a significant part of Pope John Paul I conspiracy theories. Contents 1 Birth… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.