mold


mold
mold1
moldable, adj.moldability, n.
/mohld/, n.
1. a hollow form or matrix for giving a particular shape to something in a molten or plastic state.
2. the shape created or imparted to a thing by a mold.
3. something formed in or on a mold: a mold of jelly.
4. a frame on which something is formed or made.
5. shape or form.
6. a prototype, example, or precursor.
7. a distinctive nature, character, or type: a person of a simple mold.
8. Shipbuilding.
a. a three-dimensional pattern used to shape a plate after it has been softened by heating.
b. a template for a frame.
9. Archit.
a. a molding.
b. a group of moldings.
v.t.
10. to work into a required shape or form; shape.
11. to shape or form in or on a mold.
12. Metall. to form a mold of or from, in order to make a casting.
13. to produce by or as if by shaping material; form.
14. to have influence in determining or forming: to mold the character of a child.
15. to ornament with moldings.
Also, esp. Brit., mould.
[1175-1225; (n.) ME molde < OF modle < L modulus MODULE; (v.) ME, deriv. of the n.]
mold2
/mohld/, n.
1. a growth of minute fungi forming on vegetable or animal matter, commonly as a downy or furry coating, and associated with decay or dampness.
2. any of the fungi that produce such a growth.
v.t., v.i.
3. to become or cause to become overgrown or covered with mold.
Also, esp. Brit., mould.
[1150-1200; late ME mowlde, appar. n. use of var. of earlier mowled, ptp. of moulen, mawlen to grow moldy, c. dial. Dan mugle]
mold3
/mohld/, n.
1. loose, friable earth, esp. when rich in organic matter and favorable to the growth of plants.
2. Brit. Dial. ground; earth.
Also, esp. Brit., mould.
[bef. 900; ME, OE molde earth, dust, ground; c. Goth mulda dust; akin to MEAL2, MILL1]

* * *

Town (pop., 1995 est.: 9,000), historic and present county of Flintshire, northeastern Wales.

Situated between the industrial centres of Deeside and Wrexham, it grew up around a motte-and-bailey castle built by the Normans in the 12th century. In the area native Briton Christians had defeated the pagan Picts and Scots in a battle waged in AD 430. Long a market hub, it is the administrative centre and historic county seat of Flintshire.

* * *

Welsh  Yr Wyddgrug 

      town, historic and present county of Flintshire (Sir Fflint), northeastern Wales, situated on a small stretch of farmland between the two industrial centres of Deeside and Wrexham. Mold grew up around a motte-and-bailey castle that the Normans built in the 12th century. The native Christian Britons of the area defeated the Picts and Scots in an important battle waged in 430 CE; an obelisk, built in 1736 and located 1 mile (1.6 km) northwest of town, commemorates the victory. Mold has long been a market centre for the area. The 19th-century writer Daniel Owen (Owen, Daniel), widely considered the father of the Welsh novel, was born in Mold, and the town's cultural centre contains some of his original manuscripts and personal items. Mold is the administrative centre and historic county town (seat) of Flintshire. Pop. (2001) 9,568.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • mold — mold·abil·i·ty; mold·able; mold·i·ness; mold·ing; mold; mold·man; mold·wrap; re·mold; un·mold; mold·er; mold·i·warp; …   English syllables

  • mold — mold1 [mōld] n. [ME moolde < OFr molle, earlier modle < L modulus: see MODULE] 1. a pattern, hollow form, or matrix for giving a certain shape to something in a plastic or molten state 2. a frame, shaped core, etc. on or around which… …   English World dictionary

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [OE. molde, OF. mole, F. moule, fr. L. modulus. See {Model}.] [For spelling, see 2d {Mold}, above.] 1. The matrix, or cavity, in which anything is shaped, and from which it takes its form; also, the body or mass containing… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. [Cf. F. mouler, OF. moler, moller. See {Mold} the matrix.] 1. To form into a particular shape; to shape; to model; to fashion. [1913 Webster] He forgeth and moldeth metals. Sir M. Hale. [1913 Webster] Did I request thee,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [OE. molde, AS. molde; akin to D. mul, G. mull, mulm, OHG. molt, molta, Icel. mold, Dan. muld, Sw. mull, Goth. mulda, and E. meal flour. See {Meal}, and cf. {Mole} an animal, {Mull}, v.] [The prevalent spelling is, perhaps,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mold — Ⅰ. mold [1] (Brit. mould) ► NOUN 1) a hollow container used to give shape to molten or hot liquid material when it cools and hardens. 2) something made in this way, especially a jelly or mousse. 3) a distinctive type, style, or character. ► VERB… …   English terms dictionary

  • mold|y — «MOHL dee», adjective, mold|i|er, mold|i|est. 1. covered with mold: »a moldy crust of bread, moldy cheese. 2. musty, as from decay or age: »a moldy smell …   Useful english dictionary

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, n. [From the p. p. of OE. moulen to become moldy, to rot, prob. fr. Icel. mygla to grow musty, mugga mugginess; cf. Sw. m[ o]gla to grow moldy. See {Muggy}, and cf. {Moldy}.] (Bot.) A growth of minute fungi of various kinds,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Molded} or {Moulded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Molding} or {Moulding}.] To cover with mold or soil. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. t. To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mold — Mold, Mould Mould, v. i. To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.