Mohawk


Mohawk
/moh"hawk/, n., pl. Mohawks, (esp. collectively) Mohawk.
1. a member of a tribe of the most easterly of the Iroquois Five Nations, formerly resident along the Mohawk River, New York.
2. the Iroquoian language of the Mohawk Indians.
3. a river flowing E from central New York to the Hudson. 148 mi. (240 km) long.
4. (often l.c.) Also called Mohawk haircut. a hairstyle in which the head is shaved bare except for a strip of hair, usually with blunt, brushlike ends, down the center of the scalp from the forehead to the nape of the neck.
5. Mil. a twin turboprop, two-seat U.S. Army aircraft fitted with cameras, radar, and infrared sensors and designed to monitor enemy operations.

* * *

North American Indian people, the easternmost group of the Iroquois Confederacy, living in Canada and the U.S. Their language is a member of the Iroquoian language family.

Their name for themselves is Kahniakehake, which means "People of the Flint" and within the confederacy they were considered to be the "Keepers of the Eastern Door." The Mohawk lived near what is now Schenectady, N.Y. They were semisedentary; women practiced corn agriculture, while men hunted during the fall and winter and fished during the summer. Related families lived together in longhouses. Most Mohawk sided with the British in both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution, in the latter under Joseph Brant. They number more than 35,000 and have a wide reputation as structural ironworkers; many have been hired in the building of major bridges.

* * *

people
      Iroquoian-speaking North American Indian tribe and the easternmost tribe of the Iroquois Confederacy. Their name for themselves is Kahniakehake, which means “people of the flint,” and within the confederacy they were considered to be the “keepers of the eastern door.” At the time of European colonization, they occupied three villages west of what is now Schenectady, N.Y., U.S.

      Like the other Iroquois tribes, the Mohawk were semisedentary. Women engaged in corn (maize) agriculture; men hunted during the fall and winter and fished during the summer. Related families lived together in longhouses (longhouse), a symbol of Iroquois society. Each Mohawk community also had a local council that guided the village chief or chiefs.

      According to some traditional accounts, the Mohawk visionary chief Dekanawida, who preached principles of peace, was instrumental in founding the Iroquois Confederacy. The Mohawk had nine representatives in the Confederacy, three each from their Turtle, Wolf, and Bear clans. As with other Iroquois-speaking tribes, the Mohawk warred frequently against neighbouring Algonquian (Algonquian languages)-speakers; the Dutch introduction of firearms during the fur trade increased the number of Mohawk victories. After contact with Europeans, however, the tribe diminished rapidly because of introduced diseases such as smallpox. Most Mohawk allied with the British in the French and Indian War, but some Catholic converts at mission settlements in Canada espoused the French cause and guided expeditions against their former alliance brothers.

      During the American Revolution the Mohawk were pro-British; as the war concluded, they followed their leader Joseph Brant (Thayendanega) to Canada, where they have descendants at the Bay of Quinte and the Six Nations Indian Reserve at Brantford, Ont.

 Although they are involved in many professions, contemporary Mohawk people may be best known for their work on high steel construction projects, including the Empire State Building and the George Washington Bridge, both in New York City. For some individuals this dangerous work may represent a continuation of the Mohawk ideals of bravery and personal risk taking for the greater good.

      Population estimates suggested some 47,000 Mohawk descendants in the early 21st century.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mohawk — may refer to: Mohawk people, an indigenous people of North America (Canada and New York) Mohawk language, the language spoken by the Mohawk people Mohawk hairstyle, from a hairstyle once thought to have been traditionally worn by the Mohawk… …   Wikipedia

  • MOHAWK — Tribu indienne d’Amérique du Nord appartenant à la famille linguistique des Iroquois et originaire de l’actuel État de New York, les Mohawk, tout comme les autres tribus iroquoises, menaient une vie semi sédentaire. Les femmes s’occupaient de la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Mohawk —   [ məʊhɔːk], Stamm der Irokesen. Die während des Nordamerikanischen Unabhängigkeitskrieges probritisch eingestellten Mohawk folgten anschließend zum großen Teil ihrem Führer Joseph Brant (* 1742, ✝ 1807) nach Kanada, wo sie in Ontario… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Mohawk — Mo hawk, prop. n. 1. (Ethnol.) One of a tribe of Indians who formed part of the Five Nations. They formerly inhabited the valley of the Mohawk River. [1913 Webster] 2. One of certain ruffians who infested the streets of London in the time of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mohawk — Mohawk, NY U.S. village in New York Population (2000): 2660 Housing Units (2000): 1233 Land area (2000): 0.883786 sq. miles (2.288996 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.025464 sq. miles (0.065951 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.909250 sq. miles (2.354947… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mohawk, NY — U.S. village in New York Population (2000): 2660 Housing Units (2000): 1233 Land area (2000): 0.883786 sq. miles (2.288996 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.025464 sq. miles (0.065951 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.909250 sq. miles (2.354947 sq. km)… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Mohawk — Mohawk1 [mō′hôk΄] n. [Narragansett mohowawog, lit., man eaters: orig. so named by enemy tribes ] 1. pl. Mohawks or Mohawk a member of a North American Indian people formerly living in the Mohawk Valley of New York and now living in Ontario,… …   English World dictionary

  • Mohawk [1] — Mohawk (spr. mō haok), 1) Fluß im nordamerikan. Staate New York, entspringt auf dem Plateau östlich vom Ontariosee, wird von Rome an vom Eriekanal (den er speist) begleitet, bildet zahlreiche Schnellen und Wasserfälle, zuletzt die 50 m hohen… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mohawk [2] — Mohawk (spr. mō haok), nordamerikan. Indianerstamm der Irokesen (s. d.), im S. des St. Lorenzstroms und Ontariosees, eine der sogen. Sechs Nationen, einst mächtig und gefürchtet, jetzt nur noch wenige hundert Köpfe stark an der Bai von Quinté,… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mohawk — (spr. mōhahk), r. Nebenfluß des Hudson im nordamerik. Staate Neuyork, mündet nach 257 km. – Die M. östl. Zweig der Irokesen …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mohawk — (–hak), Name einiger nordamerikan. Flüsse, der bekannteste ist ein Nebenfluß des Hudson. M.s, ein Stamm der Irokesen …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.