moderate


moderate
moderately, adv.moderateness, n.
adj., n. /mod"euhr it, mod"rit/; v. /mod"euh rayt'/, adj., n., v., moderated, moderating.
adj.
1. kept or keeping within reasonable or proper limits; not extreme, excessive, or intense: a moderate price.
2. of medium quantity, extent, or amount: a moderate income.
3. mediocre or fair: moderate talent.
4. calm or mild, as of the weather.
5. of or pertaining to moderates, as in politics or religion.
n.
6. a person who is moderate in opinion or opposed to extreme views and actions, esp. in politics or religion.
7. (usually cap.) a member of a political party advocating moderate reform.
v.t.
8. to reduce the excessiveness of; make less violent, severe, intense, or rigorous: to moderate the sharpness of one's words.
9. to preside over or at (a public forum, meeting, discussion, etc.).
v.i.
10. to become less violent, severe, intense, or rigorous.
11. to act as moderator; preside.
[1350-1400; ME moderate (adj.), moderaten (v.) < L moderatus (ptp. of moderari to restrain, control), equiv. to modera- v. s. (see MODEST) + -tus ptp. suffix]
Syn. 1. reasonable, temperate, judicious, just, cool, steady, calm. MODERATE, TEMPERATE, JUDICIOUS, REASONABLE all stress the avoidance of excess - emotional, physical, intellectual, or otherwise. MODERATE implies response or behavior that is by nature not excessive: a moderate drinker, a moderate amount of assistance.
TEMPERATE, interchangeable with MODERATE in some general uses, usually stresses the idea of caution, control, or self-restraint: a surprisingly temperate response to the angry challenge. JUDICIOUS emphasizes prudence and the exercise of careful judgment: a judicious balance between freedom and restraint; judicious care to offend neither side. REASONABLE suggests the imposition or adoption of limits derived from the application of reason or good sense: a reasonable price; a reasonable amount of damages allotted to each claimant. 2. average. 8. meliorate, pacify, calm, mitigate, soften, mollify, temper, qualify, appease, abate, lessen, diminish. See allay.
Ant. 5, 6. radical.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Moderate — Mod er*ate, a. [L. moderatus, p. p. of moderate, moderati, to moderate, regulate, control, fr. modus measure. See {Mode}.] Kept within due bounds; observing reasonable limits; not excessive, extreme, violent, or rigorous; limited; restrained; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moderate# — moderate adj 1 Moderate, temperate are often used interchangeably to denote not excessive in degree, amount, or intensity {a moderate allowance} {temperate heat} When contrasted moderate often connotes absence or avoidance of excess and is… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • moderate — Ⅰ. moderate UK US /ˈmɒdərət/ adjective ► not very small or large but between the two: moderate growth/inflation/increase »Moderate growth last year was enough to raise a profit. moderate gains/losses »Investors saw moderate gains on Wall Street… …   Financial and business terms

  • moderate — [mäd′ər it; ] for v. [, mäd′ərāt΄] adj. [ME moderat < L moderatus, pp. of moderare, to keep within bounds, restrain < modus: see MODE] 1. within reasonable limits; avoiding excesses or extremes; temperate or restrained 2. mild; calm;… …   English World dictionary

  • Moderate — Mod er*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Moderated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Moderating}.] 1. To restrain from excess of any kind; to reduce from a state of violence, intensity, or excess; to keep within bounds; to make temperate; to lessen; to allay; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moderate — [adj1] calm, temperate abstinent, balanced, bearable, careful, cautious, compromising, conservative, considerate, considered, controlled, cool, deliberate, disciplined, dispassionate, equable, even, gentle, impartial, inconsiderable, inexpensive …   New thesaurus

  • Moderate — Mod er*ate, v. i. 1. To become less violent, severe, rigorous, or intense; as, the wind has moderated. [1913 Webster] 2. To preside as a moderator. [1913 Webster] Dr. Barlow [was] engaged . . . to moderate for him in the divinity disputation. Bp …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moderate — ► ADJECTIVE 1) average in amount, intensity, or degree. 2) (of a political position) not radical or extreme. ► NOUN ▪ a person with moderate views. ► VERB 1) make or become less extreme or intense. 2) review (examination papers or results) to… …   English terms dictionary

  • Moderate — Mod er*ate, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of a party in the Church of Scotland in the 18th century, and part of the 19th, professing moderation in matters of church government, in discipline, and in doctrine. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • moderate — I (preside over) verb act as chairman, act as moderator, act as president, administer, be at the head of, be in authority, chair, command, control, direct, discipline, govern, have charge of, head, hold in check, hold sway over, hold the chair,… …   Law dictionary

  • moderate — англ. [мо/дэрит] moderately [мо/дэритли] in moderation [ин модэрэ/йшн] умеренно, сдержанно …   Словарь иностранных музыкальных терминов