manure


manure
manurer, n.manurial, adj.manurially, adv.
/meuh noor", -nyoor"/, n., v., manured, manuring.
n.
1. excrement, esp. of animals, or other refuse used as fertilizer.
2. any natural or artificial substance for fertilizing the soil.
v.t.
3. to treat (land) with fertilizing matter; apply manure to.
[1350-1400; ME manouren to till, cultivate < MF manouvrer to do manual work. See MANEUVER]

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Organic material that is used to fertilize land, usually consisting of the feces and urine of domestic livestock, with or without litter such as straw, hay, or bedding.

Some countries also use human excrement ("night soil"). Though livestock manure is less rich in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potash than synthetic fertilizers and therefore must be applied in much greater quantities, it is rich in organic matter, or humus, and thus improves the capacity of the soil to absorb and store water, thereby preventing erosion. Because manure must be carefully stored and spread in order to derive the most benefit, some farmers decline to expend the necessary time and effort. Manufactured chemical fertilizers, though more concentrated and efficient, are also more costly and more likely to cause excess runoff and pollution. See also green manure.

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      organic material that is used to fertilize land, usually consisting of the feces and urine of domestic livestock, with or without accompanying litter such as straw, hay, or bedding. Farm animals void most of the nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that is present in the food they eat, and this constitutes an enormous fertility resource. In some countries, human excrement is also used. Livestock manure is less rich in nitrogen, phosphorus, and potash than synthetic fertilizers and hence must be applied in much greater quantities than the latter. A ton of manure from cattle, hogs, or horses usually contains only 10 pounds of nitrogen, 5 pounds of phosphorus pentoxide, and 10 pounds of potash. But manure is rich in organic matter, or humus, and thus improves the soil's capacity to absorb and store water, thus preventing erosion. Much of the potassium and nitrogen in manure can be lost through leaching if the material is exposed to rainfall before being applied to the field. These nutrient losses may be prevented by such methods as stacking manure under cover or in pits to prevent leaching, spreading it on fields as soon as it is feasible, and spreading preservative materials in the stable. A green manure is a cover crop of some kind, such as rye, that is plowed under while still green to add fertility and conditioning to the soil.

      The use of manure as fertilizer dates to the beginnings of agriculture. On modern farms manure is usually applied with a manure spreader, a four-wheeled self-propelled or two-wheeled tractor-drawn wagon. As the spreader moves, a drag-chain conveyor located at the bottom of the box sweeps the manure to the rear, where it is successively shredded by a pair of beaters before being spread by rotating spiral fins. Home gardeners like to use well-rotted manure, since it is less odorous, more easily spread, and less likely to “burn” plants. See also fertilizer.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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  • Manure — Ma*nure (m[.a]*n[=u]r ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Manured} (m[.a]*n[=u]rd ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Manuring}.] [Contr, from OF. manuvrer, manovrer, to work with the hand, to cultivate by manual labor, F. man[oe]uvrer. See {Manual}, {Ure}, {Opera}, and cf …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • manure — [mə noor′, mənyoor′] vt. manured, manuring [ME manouren, orig., to farm (land) < Anglo Fr maynoberer < OFr manouvrer, to cultivate, lit., to work with the hands: see MANEUVER] to put manure on or into (soil) n. [< MANURE the vt.] animal… …   English World dictionary

  • manure — ► NOUN ▪ animal dung used for fertilizing land. ► VERB ▪ apply manure to. ORIGIN originally in the sense «cultivate (land)»: from Old French manouvrer (see MANOEUVRE(Cf. ↑manoeuvre)) …   English terms dictionary

  • manure — ma*nure (m[.a]*n[=u]r ), n. Any matter which makes land productive; a fertilizing substance. Especially,, dung, the contents of stables and barnyards, decaying animal or vegetable substances, etc. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • manure — [n] fertilizer buffalo chips*, compost, cow chips*, cowplop*, droppings, dung, excrement, guano, maul*, meadow muffins*, mulch; concepts 260,399,429 …   New thesaurus

  • Manure — This article is about organic material used as soil fertilizer. For animal dung used for other purposes, see feces. Animal manure is often a mixture of animal feces and bedding straw, as in this example from a stable. A horse grazes in his… …   Wikipedia

  • manure — {{11}}manure (n.) dung or compost used as fertilizer, 1540s, see MANURE (Cf. manure) (v.). {{12}}manure (v.) c.1400, to cultivate land, also to hold property, from Anglo Fr. meynoverer, O.Fr. manouvrer to work with the hands, cultivate; carry… …   Etymology dictionary

  • manure — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ animal, chicken, cow, horse, pig ▪ livestock, poultry ▪ farmyard (esp. AmE) …   Collocations dictionary

  • manure — I UK [məˈnjʊə(r)] / US [məˈnʊr] noun [uncountable] solid waste from farm animals, often mixed with other substances and used on crops to help them to grow II UK [məˈnjʊə(r)] / US [məˈnʊr] verb [transitive] Word forms manure : present tense… …   English dictionary

  • manure — n. to spread manure * * * [mə njʊə] to spread manure …   Combinatory dictionary