mannerism


mannerism
mannerist, n.manneristic, adj.manneristically, adv.
/man"euh riz'euhm/, n.
1. a habitual or characteristic manner, mode, or way of doing something; distinctive quality or style, as in behavior or speech: He has an annoying mannerism of tapping his fingers while he talks. They copied his literary mannerisms but always lacked his ebullience.
2. marked or excessive adherence to an unusual or a particular manner, esp. if affected: Natural courtesy is a world apart from snobbish mannerism.
3. (usually cap.) a style in the fine arts developed principally in Europe during the 16th century, chiefly characterized by a complex perspectival system, elongation of forms, strained gestures or poses of figures, and intense, often strident color.
[1795-1805; MANNER1 + -ISM]

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Artistic style that predominated in Italy from the end of the High Renaissance in the 1520s to the beginnings of the Baroque period с 1590.

Mannerism originated in Florence and Rome but ultimately spread as far as central and northern Europe. A reaction to the harmonious Classicism and idealized naturalism of High Renaissance art, Mannerism was concerned with solving intricate artistic problems, such as portraying nudes in complex poses. The figures in Mannerist works frequently have graceful but queerly elongated limbs, small heads, and stylized facial features, while their poses seem difficult or contrived. The deep, linear perspectival space of High Renaissance painting is flattened and obscured so that the figures appear as a decorative arrangement of forms in front of a flat background of indeterminate dimensions. Mannerists sought a continuous refinement of form and concept, pushing exaggeration and contrast to great limits. After being superseded by the Baroque style, it was seen as decadent and degenerative. By the 20th century it was appreciated anew for its technical bravura and elegance. Major artists who practiced the style include Parmigianino, Federico Zuccaro, and Il Bronzino.

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art
Italian  Manierismo 

      (from maniera, “manner,” or “style”), artistic style that predominated in Italy from the end of the High Renaissance in the 1520s to the beginnings of the Baroque style around 1590. The Mannerist style originated in Florence and Rome and spread to northern Italy and, ultimately, to much of central and northern Europe. The term was first used around the end of the 18th century by the Italian archaeologist Luigi Lanzi to define 16th-century artists who were the followers of major Renaissance masters.

      Mannerism originated as a reaction to the harmonious classicism (Classicism and Neoclassicism) and the idealized naturalism of High Renaissance art (painting) as practiced by Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Raphael in the first two decades of the 16th century. In the portrayal of the human nude, the standards of formal complexity had been set by Michelangelo, and the norm of idealized beauty by Raphael. But in the work of these artists' Mannerist successors, an obsession with style and technique in figural composition often outweighed the importance and meaning of the subject matter. The highest value was instead placed upon the apparently effortless solution of intricate artistic problems, such as the portrayal of the nude in complex and artificial poses.

      Mannerist artists evolved a style that is characterized by artificiality and artiness, by a thoroughly self-conscious cultivation of elegance and technical facility, and by a sophisticated indulgence in the bizarre. The figures in Mannerist works frequently have graceful but queerly elongated limbs, small heads, and stylized facial features, while their poses seem difficult or contrived. The deep, linear perspectival space of High Renaissance painting is flattened and obscured so that the figures appear as a decorative arrangement of forms in front of a flat background of indeterminate dimensions. Mannerists sought a continuous refinement of form and concept, pushing exaggeration and contrast to great limits. The results included strange and constricting spatial relationships, jarring juxtapositions of intense and unnatural colours, an emphasis on abnormalities of scale, a sometimes totally irrational mix of classical motifs and other visual references to the antique, and inventive and grotesque pictorial fantasies.

      Mannerist elements are already present in some of Raphael's (Raphael) later paintings done in Rome, notably the “Transfiguration” (1517–20; Vatican Museum). In the period from 1515 to 1524 the Florentine painters Rosso Fiorentino and Jacopo da Pontormo (Pontormo, Jacopo da) broke away from Renaissance classicism and evolved an expressive, emotionally agitated style in their religious compositions. Among the most notable of these early Mannerist works are Pontormo's Visdomini altarpiece (1518; Church of S. Michele Visdomini, Florence) and Rosso's “Deposition” (1521; Pinacoteca Comunale, Volterra). In the early 1520s Rosso journeyed to Rome, where he joined the artists Giulio Romano, Perino del Vaga, and Polidoro da Caravaggio, who had all been followers of Raphael in his work for the Vatican. The Mannerist style completely emerged in the paintings of these artists as well as in those of Parmigianino. The latter's “Madonna with the Long Neck” (1534; Uffizi, Florence), Rosso's “Dead Christ with Angels” (c. 1526; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston), and Pontormo's “Deposition” (1525–28; church of Sta. Felicita, Florence) are preeminent works of Mannerism's maturity. Michelangelo's (Michelangelo) huge fresco “The Last Judgment” (1533–41; Sistine Chapel, Vatican) shows strong Mannerist tendencies in its agitated composition, formless and indeterminate space, and in the tortured poses and exaggerated musculature of its bunches of nude figures.

      The sophisticated Mannerism that developed in Rome before 1527 became the chief formative influence on the styles of a number of younger Italian painters who were active during the 1530s, '40s, and '50s. Among them were Giorgio Vasari (Vasari, Giorgio), Daniele da Volterra, Francesco Salviati (Salviati, Francesco), Domenico Beccafumi (Beccafumi, Domenico), Federico Zuccari (Zuccaro, Federico), Pellegrino Tibaldi (Tibaldi, Pellegrino), and most notably Bronzino (Bronzino, Il), who was the pupil of Pontormo and who became the most important Mannerist painter in Florence at this time. Meanwhile, Mannerism had begun to spread outside Italy; Rosso took the style to France in 1530 and was followed there two years later by Francesco Primaticcio (Primaticcio, Francesco), who evolved an important French variant of Mannerism in his decorations done at the French royal court at Fontainebleau. Mannerism was transplanted and disseminated throughout central and northern Europe around mid-century through large numbers of engravings of Italian paintings and through the visits of northern artists to Rome to study. Bartholomaeus Spranger (Spranger, Bartholomaeus), Hendrik Goltzius (Goltzius, Hendrik), and Hans von Aachen became important Mannerist painters. Although the Dutch cities of Haarlem and Amsterdam became centres of the new style, the most ambitious patronage was practiced at Prague by the Emperor Rudolf II; (Rudolf II) Spranger and others who worked for Rudolf evolved a rather bizarre and exotic Mannerism that occasionally degenerated into the merely grotesque and inexplicable.

      In sculpture (Western sculpture), the serpentine complexity of Michelangelo's late sculptures, as epitomized in the sinuously spiraling form of his “Victory” (1532–34; Palazzo Vecchio, Florence), dominated Mannerist aspirations in this medium. The sculptors Bartolommeo Ammannati (Ammannati, Bartolommeo), Benvenuto Cellini (Cellini, Benvenuto), and, most importantly, Giambologna became the principal practitioners of Mannerism with their graceful and complexly posed statues.

      Mannerism retained a high level of international popularity until the paintings of Annibale Carracci (Carracci, Annibale) and of Caravaggio around 1600 brought the problematic style to an end and ushered in the long ascendancy of the Baroque. Mannerism was for long afterward looked down upon as a decadent and anarchic style that simply marked a degeneration of High Renaissance artistic production. But in the 20th century the style came to be appreciated anew for its technical bravura, elegance, and polish. Mannerism's spiritual intensity, its complex and intellectual aestheticism, its experimentation in form, and the persistent psychological anxiety manifested in it made the style attractive and interesting to the modern temperament, which saw affinities between it and modern expressionist tendencies in art.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Mannerism — Man ner*ism, n. [Cf. F. mani[ e]risme.] 1. Adherence to a peculiar style or manner; a characteristic mode of action, bearing, behavior, or treatment of others. [1913 Webster] 2. Adherence to a peculiar style or manner carried to excess,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • mannerism — excessive use of distinctive methods in art or literature, 1803, from MANNER (Cf. manner) + ISM (Cf. ism). Meaning an instance of mannerism, habitual peculiarity is from 1819. Related: Mannerisms …   Etymology dictionary

  • mannerism — ► NOUN 1) a habitual gesture or way of speaking or behaving. 2) the use of a highly distinctive style in art, literature, or music. 3) (Mannerism) a style of 16th century Italian art characterized by distortions in scale and perspective.… …   English terms dictionary

  • mannerism — index characteristic, habit, identity (individuality), quirk (idiosyncrasy), specialty (distinctive mark) …   Law dictionary

  • mannerism — *pose, air, affectation Analogous words: *eccentricity, idiosyncrasy: peculiarity, singularity, oddness, queerness (see corresponding adjectives at STRANGE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • mannerism — [n] peculiarity of how someone behaves, acts affectation, air, characteristic, eccentricity, foible, habit, idiosyncrasy, oddness, pose, pretension, queerness, quirk, singularity, trait, trick; concept 644 …   New thesaurus

  • mannerism — [man′ər iz΄əm] n. 1. excessive use of some distinctive, often affected, manner or style in art, literature, speech, or behavior 2. a peculiarity of manner in behavior, speech, etc. that has become a habit 3. [M ] a 16th cent. style in art… …   English World dictionary

  • Mannerism — In Parmigianino s Madonna with the Long Neck (1534 40), Mannerism makes itself known by elongated proportions, highly stylized poses, and lack of clear perspective. Mannerism is a period of European art that emerged from the later years of the… …   Wikipedia

  • Mannerism —    Term used by art historians to label a style of painting, sculpture, and architecture that arose in the 1520s as a variant of the style of High Renaissance masters such as Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. The death of Leonardo in… …   Historical Dictionary of Renaissance

  • MANNERISM —    Although the style of Mannerist architecture is relatively easy to recognize, scholars differ in their explanations of its origins and motivations. Mannerist architecture first appeared in Italy in the 1520s. It is sometimes thought to have… …   Historical Dictionary of Architecture