magazine


magazine
magazinish, magaziny, adj.
/mag'euh zeen", mag"euh zeen'/, n.
1. a publication that is issued periodically, usually bound in a paper cover, and typically contains essays, stories, poems, etc., by many writers, and often photographs and drawings, frequently specializing in a particular subject or area, as hobbies, news, or sports.
2. a room or place for keeping gunpowder and other explosives, as in a fort or on a warship.
3. a building or place for keeping military stores, as arms, ammunition, or provisions.
4. a metal receptacle for a number of cartridges, inserted into certain types of automatic weapons and when empty removed and replaced by a full receptacle in order to continue firing.
5. Also called magazine show. Radio and Television.
a. Also called newsmagazine. a regularly scheduled news program consisting of several short segments in which various subjects of current interest are examined, usually in greater detail than on a regular newscast.
b. a program with a varied format that combines interviews, commentary, entertainment, etc.
7. Photog. cartridge (def. 4).
8. a supply chamber, as in a stove.
9. a storehouse; warehouse.
10. a collection of war munitions.
[1575-85; < F magasin < It magazzino storehouse < Ar makhazin, pl. of makhzan storehouse; in E figuratively, as "storehouse of information," used in book titles (from c1640) and periodical titles (in The Gentleman's Magazine, 1731)]

* * *

Printed collection of texts (essays, articles, stories, poems), often illustrated, that is produced at regular intervals.

Modern magazines have roots in early printed pamphlets, broadsides, chapbooks, and almanacs. One of the first magazines was the German Erbauliche Monaths-Unterredungen ("Edifying Monthly Discussions"), issued from 1663 to 1668. In the early 18th century Joseph Addison and Richard Steele brought out the influential periodicals The Tatler and The Spectator; other critical reviews began in the mid 1700s. By the 19th century, magazines catering to specialized audiences had developed, including the women's weekly, the religious and missionary review, and the illustrated magazine. One of the greatest benefits to magazine publishing in the late 19th and early 20th centuries was the addition of advertisements as a means of financial support. Subsequent developments included more illustrations and vastly greater specialization. With the computer age, magazines ("e-zines") also became available over the Internet.

* * *

also called  periodical 

      a printed collection of texts (essays, articles, stories, poems), often illustrated, that is produced at regular intervals (excluding newspapers). A brief treatment of magazines follows. For full treatment, see publishing: Magazine publishing (publishing, history of).

      The modern magazine has its roots in early printed pamphlets, broadsides, chapbooks, and almanacs, a few of which gradually began appearing at regular intervals. The earliest magazines collected a variety of material designed to appeal to particular interests. One of the earliest ones was a German publication, Erbauliche Monaths-Unterredungen (“Edifying Monthly Discussions”), which was issued periodically from 1663 to 1668. Other learned journals soon appeared in France, England, and Italy, and in the early 1670s lighter and more entertaining magazines began to appear, beginning with Le Mercure Galant (1672; later renamed Mercure de France) in France. In the early 18th century, Joseph Addison and Richard Steele brought out The Tatler (Tatler, The) (1709–11; published three times weekly) and The Spectator (Spectator, The) (1711–12, 1714; published daily). These influential periodicals contained essays on matters political and topical that continue to be regarded as examples of some of the finest English prose written. Other critical reviews treating literary and political issues also started up in the mid-1700s throughout western Europe, and at the end of the century specialized periodicals began appearing, devoted to particular fields of intellectual interest, such as archaeology, botany, or philosophy.

      By the early 19th century a different, less learned audience had been identified, and new types of magazines for entertainment and family enjoyment began to appear, among them the popular weekly, the women's weekly, the religious and missionary review, the illustrated magazine, and the children's weekly. Their growth was stimulated by the general public's broader interest in social and political affairs and by the middle and lower classes' growing demand for reading matter. Woodcuts and engravings were first extensively used by the weekly Illustrated London News (1842), and by the end of the 19th century many magazines were illustrated.

  Magazine publishing benefited in the late 19th and 20th centuries from a number of technical improvements, including the production of inexpensive paper, the invention of the rotary press and the halftone block, and, especially, the addition of advertisements as a means of financial support. Other developments since then have included a greater specialization of topics; more illustrations, especially those reproducing colour photographs; a decline in power and popularity of the critical review and a rise in that of the mass-market magazine; and an increase in magazines for women. See also little magazine.
 

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • magazine — [ magazin ] n. m. • 1776 n. f.; mot angl., du fr. magasin 1 ♦ Publication périodique, généralement illustrée. ⇒ journal, revue; fanzine. Magazine féminin. Magazine hebdomadaire, mensuel. Feuilleter des magazines. Une pile de vieux magazines. 2 ♦… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • magazine — mag‧a‧zine [ˌmægəˈziːn ǁ ˈmægəziːn] noun [countable] a large thin book containing news, articles, photographs etc which is produced weekly or monthly: • The magazine has a weekly circulation (= the number of copies sold ) of four million. • the… …   Financial and business terms

  • Magazine — Говард Девото Основная информация …   Википедия

  • Magazine Z — Categories Seinen manga Frequency monthly First issue June 26, 1999 Final issue January 26, 2009 Company Kodansha Country Japan …   Wikipedia

  • Magazine — Mag a*zine , n. [F. magasin, It. magazzino, or Sp. magacen, almagacen; all fr. Ar. makhzan, almakhzan, a storehouse, granary, or cellar.] [1913 Webster] 1. A receptacle in which anything is stored, especially military stores, as ammunition, arms …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Magazine 60 — est un groupe français fondé en 1981 par Jean Luc Drion, producteur indépendant. Yves, Marc et Danielle Delval,Jean Luc Drion et Alain Dernoncourt en seront les chanteurs. Jean Luc Drion, auteur compositeur et arrangeur déjà reconnu dans le… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Magazine 60 — Origin Lille, France Genres New Wave, Synthpop, Euro disco Years active 1981 1992 Labels Barclay, Columbia …   Wikipedia

  • Magazine — Magazine, AR U.S. city in Arkansas Population (2000): 915 Housing Units (2000): 394 Land area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Magazine, AR — U.S. city in Arkansas Population (2000): 915 Housing Units (2000): 394 Land area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.664934 sq. miles (4.312159 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • magazine — (n.) 1580s, place for storing goods, especially military ammunition, from M.Fr. magasin warehouse, depot, store (15c.), from It. magazzino, from Arabic makhazin, pl. of makhzan storehouse (Cf. Sp. almacén warehouse, magazine ), from khazana to… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Magazine — Mag a*zine , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Magazined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Magazining}.] To store in, or as in, a magazine; to store up for use. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.