Maasai


Maasai
/mah suy", mah"suy/, n., pl. Maasais, (esp. collectively) Maasai.
Masai.

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people
also spelled  Masai  
 nomadic pastoralists of East Africa. Maasai is essentially a linguistic term, referring to speakers of this Eastern Sudanic language (Eastern Sudanic languages) (usually called Maa) of the Nilo-Saharan language family. These include the pastoral Maasai who range along the Great Rift Valley of Kenya and Tanzania, the Samburu of Kenya, and the semipastoral Arusha and Baraguyu (or Kwafi) of Tanzania.

 The pastoral Maasai are fully nomadic, wandering in bands throughout the year and subsisting almost entirely on the meat, blood, and milk of their herds. Their kraal, consisting of a large circular thornbush fence around a ring of mud-dung houses, holds four to eight families and their herds. Polygyny is common among older men; wife lending occurs between men of the same age-set. Marriage involves a substantial bride-price in livestock.

      The Maasai have a number of patrilineal clans grouped into two classes, or moieties. The basic institution of social integration, however, is the system of age-sets. Under this system, groups of the same age are initiated (circumcised) into adult life during the same open-initiation period; the age-class thus formed is a permanent grouping, lasting the life of its members. They move up through a hierarchy of grades, each lasting approximately 15 years, including those of junior warriors, senior warriors, and junior elders, until they become senior elders authorized to make decisions for the tribe. Maasai society is remarkably egalitarian; slaves have never been kept.

      Between the ages of about 14 and 30, young men are traditionally known as morans. During this life stage they live in isolation in the bush, learning tribal customs and developing strength, courage, and endurance—traits for which Maasai warriors are noted throughout the world.

      Ceremonial events are directed by a ritual expert (oloiboni) who, although he has no political power, is religious head of his people.

      The Kenyan and Tanzanian governments are encouraging the Maasai to make permanent agricultural settlements and to give up the practice of isolating young men, in favour of formal education and greater assimilation.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Maasai — Maasaï Maasaï Jeune masaï Populations significatives par régions …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Maasaï — Jeune masaï Populations Population totale 300 000 880 000 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • MAASAI — fil. Adiel, 1 Par. c. 9. v. 12 …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Maasai — [mä sī′] n. alt. sp. of MASAI …   English World dictionary

  • Maasai — Infobox Ethnic group group = Maasai image caption = population = 883,000 region1 = flagcountry|Kenya spaces|8(estimates vary) pop1 = 377,089 or 453,000 ref1 = lower| lower|0.95em| region2 = flagcountry|Tanzania (northern) pop2 = 430,000 ref3 =… …   Wikipedia

  • Maasai — Dieser Artikel oder Abschnitt ist nicht hinreichend mit Belegen (Literatur, Webseiten oder Einzelnachweisen) versehen. Die fraglichen Angaben werden daher möglicherweise demnächst gelöscht. Hilf Wikipedia, indem du die Angaben recherchierst und… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Maasai — Maa|sai: Selbstbezeichnung der ↑ Massai. * * * Maasai,   afrikanisches Volk, Masai …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Maasai — n. African people group located in Kenya and Tanzania n. language of the Maasai people group …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Maasai — /mah suy , mah suy/, n., pl. Maasais, (esp. collectively) Maasai. Masai …   Useful english dictionary

  • Maasai — noun a) An indigenous group of people located in Kenya and Tanzania. b) An Eastern Nilotic language spoken in Southern Kenya and Northern Tanzania by the Masai people …   Wiktionary


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