Lodge


Lodge
/loj/, n.
1. Henry Cabot, 1850-1924, U.S. public servant and author: senator 1893-1924.
2. his grandson, Henry Cabot, Jr., 1902-85, U.S. journalist, statesman, and diplomat.
3. Sir Oliver Joseph, 1851-1940, English physicist and writer.
4. Thomas, 1558?-1625, English poet and dramatist.

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I
Originally an insubstantial dwelling, or one erected for a temporary occupational purpose (e.g., woodcutting or masonry) or for use during the hunting season.

The lodge became a more permanent type of house as the lands around European mansions were developed as parks. The lodge was often the cottage of the gamekeeper, caretaker, gatekeeper, or gardener, or it could be a larger building for occupation by a higher-ranking person. Today the word suggests a rustic dwelling or inn in a natural setting, often one used seasonally (e.g., a ski lodge).
II
(as used in expressions)
Lodge Henry Cabot
Hunters' Lodges

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      originally an insubstantial house or dwelling, erected as a seasonal habitation or for some temporary occupational purpose, such as woodcutting. In this sense the word is currently used to describe accommodations for sportsmen during hunting season and for recreationists, such as skiers.

      The lodge became a more permanent type of house as the lands around European mansions were developed as parks. The lodge was the cottage of the gamekeeper, caretaker, gatekeeper, or gardener and might be at the park's entrance or elsewhere on the grounds, usually displaying some architectural relation to the main buildings. Lodges could be of considerable size in royal parks and be occupied by important persons. Lord John Russell, for example, lived in Pembroke Lodge at Richmond Park, London, by permission of Queen Victoria, for more than 30 years.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms: