limbo


limbo
limbo1
/lim"boh/, n., pl. limbos.
1. (often cap.) Rom. Cath. Theol. a region on the border of hell or heaven, serving as the abode after death of unbaptized infants (limbo of infants) and of the righteous who died before the coming of Christ (limbo of the fathers or limbo of the patriarchs).
2. a place or state of oblivion to which persons or things are regarded as being relegated when cast aside, forgotten, past, or out of date: My youthful hopes are in the limbo of lost dreams.
3. an intermediate, transitional, or midway state or place.
4. a place or state of imprisonment or confinement.
[1300-50; ME, from ML phrase in limbo on hell's border (L: on the edge), equiv. to in on + limbo, abl. of limbus edge, border (L), place bordering on hell (ML); see LIMBUS1]
limbo2
/lim"boh/, n., pl. limbos.
a dance from the West Indies, originally for men only, in which the dancer bends backward from the knees and moves with a shuffling step under a horizontal bar that is lowered after each successive pass.
[1955-60; cf. Jamaican E limba to bend, easily bending; see LIMBER1]

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In Roman Catholicism, a region between heaven and hell, the dwelling place of souls not condemned to punishment but deprived of the joy of existence with God in heaven.

The concept probably developed in the Middle Ages. Two distinct kinds of limbo were proposed: the limbus patrum ("fathers' limbo"), where Old Testament saints were confined until liberated by Jesus in his "descent into hell"; and the limbus infantum or limbus puerorum ("children's limbo"), the abode of those who died without actual sin but whose original sin had not been washed away by baptism or whose free will was restricted by mental deficiency. Today the Catholic church downplays the notion of limbo, and it is not an official part of church doctrine.

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▪ Roman Catholic theology
      in Roman Catholic theology, the border place between heaven and hell where dwell those souls who, though not condemned to punishment, are deprived of the joy of eternal existence with God in heaven. The word is of Teutonic origin, meaning “border” or “anything joined on.” The concept of limbo probably developed in Europe in the Middle Ages but was never defined as a church dogma, and reference to it was omitted from the official catechism of the church that was issued in 1992. Two distinct kinds of limbo have been supposed to exist: (1) the limbus patrum (Latin: “fathers' limbo”), which is the place where the Old Testament saints were thought to be confined until they were liberated by Christ in his “descent into hell,” and (2) the limbus infantum, or limbus puerorum (“children's limbo”), which is the abode of those who have died without actual sin but whose original sin has not been washed away by baptism. This “children's limbo” included not only dead unbaptized infants but also the mentally impaired.

      The question of the destiny of infants dying unbaptized presented itself to Christian theologians at a relatively early period. Generally speaking, it may be said that the Greek Fathers of the Church inclined to a cheerful view and the Latin Fathers to a gloomy view. Indeed, some of the Greek Fathers expressed opinions that are almost indistinguishable from the Pelagian view that children dying unbaptized might be admitted to eternal life, though not to the Kingdom of God. St. Augustine (Augustine, Saint) recoiled from such Pelagian teachings and drew a sharp antithesis between the state of the saved and that of the damned. Later theologians followed Augustine in rejecting the notion of any final place intermediate between heaven and hell, but they otherwise were inclined to take the mildest possible view of the destiny of the irresponsible and unbaptized.

      The Roman Catholic Church in the 13th and 15th centuries made several authoritative declarations on the subject of limbo, stating that the souls of those who die in original sin only (i.e., unbaptized infants) descend into hell but are given lighter punishments than those souls guilty of actual sin. The damnation of infants and also the comparative lightness of their punishment thus became articles of faith, but the details of the place such souls occupy in hell or the nature of their actual punishment remained undetermined. From the Council of Trent (Trent, Council of) (1545–63) onward, there were considerable differences of opinion as to the extent of the infant souls' deprivation, with some theologians maintaining that the infants in limbo are affected with some degree of sadness because of a felt privation and other theologians holding that the infants enjoy every kind of natural felicity, as regards their souls now and their bodies after the resurrection.

      The concept of limbo plays no role in contemporary Catholic theological thinking. In 2004 the International Theological Commission, an advisory body to the Vatican, under the direction of Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (the future Pope Benedict XVI) began examining the question of limbo. In 2007 the commission, with the approval of Benedict, declared that the traditional view of limbo offered an “unduly restrictive view of salvation” and that there was hope that infants who died without being baptized would be saved.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Limbo — Семантика: Конкурентное программирование Появился в: 1995 Автор(ы): Шон Дорвард, Фил Винтерботтом, Роб Пайк Типизация данных: строгая Испытал влияние: C …   Википедия

  • Limbo — • A word of Teutonic derivation, meaning literally hem or border, as of a garment, or anything joined on Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Limbo     Limbo      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Limbo — Lim bo (l[i^]m b[ o]), Limbus Lim bus (l[i^]m b[u^]s), n. [L. limbus border, edge in limbo on the border. Cf. {Limb} border.] 1. (Scholastic Theol.) An spiritual region where certain classes of souls were supposed to await the last judgment.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • limbo — lim‧bo [ˈlɪmbəʊ ǁ boʊ] noun be in limbo to be in an uncertain situation in which it is not clear what will happen next: • Investors in the shares have been left in limbo since the market tailed off. * * * limbo UK US /ˈlɪmbəʊ/ noun [U] ► an… …   Financial and business terms

  • limbo — m. anat. Borde. Medical Dictionary. 2011. limbo borde, ribete Diccionario ilustrad …   Diccionario médico

  • limbo — limbo, estar en el limbo expr. no saber, ignorar, no estar al tanto. ❙ «Estar tonto: estar en Babia, estar en el limbo.» DTE. ❙ «...está en el limbo desde hace más de diez años...» Luis Mateo Díez, El expediente del náufrago, RAE CREA. ❙ «Estuve… …   Diccionario del Argot "El Sohez"

  • limbo — (Del lat. limbus). 1. m. Lugar o seno donde, según la Biblia, estaban detenidas las almas de los santos y patriarcas antiguos esperando la redención del género humano. 2. Lugar adonde, según la doctrina tradicional cristiana, van las almas de… …   Diccionario de la lengua española

  • limbo — Ⅰ. limbo [1] ► NOUN 1) (in some Christian beliefs) the supposed abode of the souls of unbaptized infants, and of the just who died before Christ. 2) an uncertain period of awaiting a decision or resolution. ORIGIN from Latin limbus hem, border,… …   English terms dictionary

  • limbo — s. m. Dança, originária de Trindade e Tobago (América Central), em que o executante dança e tenta passar por baixo de uma vara horizontal, cuja altura em relação ao solo vai diminuindo.   ‣ Etimologia: inglês limbo limbo s. m. 1. Orla, borda,… …   Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa

  • limbo — sustantivo masculino 1. Área: religión Según la Biblia, lugar donde los Patriarcas y las personas buenas antiguas esperaban la redención de Cristo. 2. Área: religión Según algunos teólogos católicos, lugar adonde van las almas de los niños que… …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • limbo — limbo1 [lim′bō] n. pl. for 2 & 3 limbos [ME < L, abl. of limbus, edge, border (in in limbo, in or on the border) < IE * (s)lemb , to hand down: see LIMP1] 1. [usually L ] in some Christian theologies, the eternal abode or state, neither… …   English World dictionary