Leyden jar


Leyden jar
a device for storing electric charge, consisting essentially of a glass jar lined inside and outside, for about two-thirds of its height, with tinfoil.
[1815-25; so called because invented in LEYDEN]

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▪ electrical instrument
      device for storing static electricity, discovered accidentally and investigated by the Dutch physicist Pieter van Musschenbroek (Musschenbroek, Pieter van) of the University of Leiden in 1746, and independently by the German inventor Ewald Georg von Kleist (Kleist, E Georg von) in 1745. In its earliest form it was a glass vial, partly filled with water, the orifice of which was closed by a cork pierced with a wire or nail that dipped into the water. To charge the jar, the exposed end of the wire was brought into contact with a friction device that produced static electricity. When the contact was broken, a charge could be demonstrated by touching the wire with the hand and receiving a shock. In its present form, the inner and outer surfaces of an insulating jar are coated with sheets of metal foil. The outer coating is connected to earth, and a suitable connection is made with the inner coating through a central brass rod that projects through the mouth of the jar. In addition to its use for classroom demonstrations, the Leyden jar is of importance as a prototype of capacitors, which are widely used in radios, television sets, and other electrical and electronic equipment.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Leyden jar — Ley den jar (l[imac] d n j[aum]r ; 277) Leyden phial Ley den phi al (f[imac] al).n. (Elec.) A glass jar or bottle used to accumulate electricity. It is coated with tin foil, within and without, nearly to its top, and is surmounted by a brass knob …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Leyden jar — Jar Jar (j[aum]r), n. [F. jarre, Sp. jarra, from Ar. jarrah ewer; cf. Pers. jarrah.] 1. A deep, broad mouthed vessel of earthenware or glass, for holding fruit, preserves, etc., or for ornamental purposes; as, a jar of honey; a rose jar. Dryden.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Leyden jar — or Leyden vial n. [after LEIDEN, where invented] a condenser for static electricity, consisting of a glass jar with a coat of tinfoil outside and inside and a metal rod connecting with the inner lining and passing through the lid …   English World dictionary

  • Leyden jar — 1755, phial used for accumulating and storing static electricity, from Leyden (modern Leiden), city in Holland; so called because it was first described (in 1746) by physicist Pieter van Musschenbroek of Leyden (1692 1761). The place name is said …   Etymology dictionary

  • Leyden jar — The Leyden jar is a simple device that stores static electricity in large amounts. It was invented in 1745 by Pieter van Musschenbroek (1692–1761), in Leiden, The Netherlands. It was the original form of the capacitor. The Leyden jar was used to… …   Wikipedia

  • Leyden jar — Leideno stiklinė statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. Leyden jar vok. Leydener Flasche, f rus. лейденская банка, f pranc. bouteille de Leyde, f …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • Leyden jar — Ley′den jar n. elm a device for storing electric charge, consisting essentially of a metal rod in a glass jar lined inside and outside with tinfoil • Etymology: 1815–25; so called because invented in Leyden …   From formal English to slang

  • Leyden jar — noun Etymology: Leiden, Leyden, Netherlands Date: 1825 an electrical capacitor consisting of a glass jar coated inside and outside with metal foil and having the inner coating connected to a conducting rod passed through an insulating stopper …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Leyden jar — [ lʌɪd(ə)n] noun an early form of capacitor consisting of a glass jar with layers of metal foil on the outside and inside. Origin C18: named after Leyden (or Leiden), the city in the Netherlands where it was invented …   English new terms dictionary

  • Leyden jar — /ˈleɪdn dʒa/ (say laydn jah) noun a device formerly used for storing electric charge, consisting essentially of a glass jar lined inside and outside, for about two thirds of its height, with tinfoil. {from Leyden (Leiden), a town in the W… …   Australian English dictionary