Leicester


Leicester
/les"teuhr/, n.
1. 1st Earl of. See Dudley, Robert.
2. a city in Leicestershire, in central England. 290,600.
3. Leicestershire.
4. one of an English breed of large sheep, noted for its coarse, long wool and large yield of mutton.

* * *

I
City and unitary authority (pop., 2001: 279,923), geographic and historic county of Leicestershire, central England.

Located on the River Soar, it was settled by Romans. A considerable community by Norman times, it was the site of a Norman castle and abbey built in 1143, the ruins of which still stand. It was where King Richard III spent the night before he was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field. It was incorporated in 1589 and became an industrial centre after the arrival of the railway in 1832. The University of Leicester (founded 1957) is nearby.
II
(as used in expressions)
Leicester Robert Dudley earl of
Earl of Leicester
Baron Snow of the City of Leicester

* * *

▪ city and unitary authority, England, United Kingdom
      city and unitary authority, geographic and historic county of Leicestershire, England, lying on the River Soar and the Grand Union Canal.

      Remains of a Roman settlement mark the point where the Fosse Way crossed the River Soar, and Leicester had a considerable burgess community by Norman times. The medieval castle was dismantled in 1645, but a few ruins remain. The abbey was founded in 1143. A royal charter of incorporation was granted in 1589. In 1832 the railway joined the town with the small Leicestershire coalfield to the northwest, and rapid industrial development followed. The oldest industry is hosiery and knitwear, but in the 19th century Leicester became famous for footwear manufacture. Light engineering followed.

      The focal centre of the town is the Clock Tower, from which shopping streets radiate. The central area has been redeveloped since World War II, and modern housing estates have replaced the deteriorating dwellings of the Industrial Revolution. A modern concert hall is named after Simon de Montfort, earl of Leicester. Nearby is the University of Leicester (chartered 1957; formerly a university college, founded 1918). There are also technical and arts schools. The Guildhall, Newarke Gateway to the castle, and Trinity Hospital all date from the 14th century, and Wyggeston School from the 16th. St. Martin's Church became a cathedral in 1926 when the diocese of Leicester was constituted. Area 28 square miles (73 square km). Pop. (2005 est.) 288,000.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Leicester — Koordinaten 52° 38′ N, 1° 8′ W …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • LEICESTER — Chef lieu du comté de Leicestershire en Grande Bretagne, située sur la Soar, affluent de rive droite de la Trent, Leicester comptait 270 493 habitants en 1991. Fondée par les Romains, c’est une des plus anciennes villes des Midlands, et de nos… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • LEICESTER — LEICESTER, county town in central England. A handful of Jews (but no community) lived here in the Middle Ages. They were expelled by Simon de Montfort in 1231 but were invited by his aunt, the countess of Winchester, to farm her lands. A section… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Leicester — Leicester, NY U.S. village in New York Population (2000): 469 Housing Units (2000): 186 Land area (2000): 0.355908 sq. miles (0.921798 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.355908 sq. miles (0.921798 …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Leicester, NY — U.S. village in New York Population (2000): 469 Housing Units (2000): 186 Land area (2000): 0.355908 sq. miles (0.921798 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.355908 sq. miles (0.921798 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Leicester [1] — Leicester (spr. Lester), 1) eine der mittleren Grafschaften von England; 37,4 QM. zwischen den Grafschaften Derby, Nottingham, Lincoln, Rutland, Northampton, Warwick u. Stafford; hügelig (Bardonhills u. Mount Soar Hill), theilweis waldig, im… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Leicester [2] — Leicester (spr. léßter), 1) Simon von Montfort, Graf von L., s. Montfort l Amaury 3). 2) Robert Dudley, Graf von, Günstling der Königin Elisabeth von England, geb. 24. Juni 1532 oder 1533, gest. 4. Sept. 1588, jüngster Sohn des Herzogs von… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Leicester [2] — Leicester (spr. Lester), 1) Robert Graf von L., s. Dudley 3). 2) Grafen von L. waren früher die Herzöge von Lancaster, später die Sidneys …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Leicester [1] — Leicester (spr. léßter), 1) Stadt (municipal borough) und Grafschaft im Innern Englands, am schiffbaren Soar und dem Leicestershire und Northamptonshire Union Kanal, inmitten eines berühmten Weidebezirks, ist unregelmäßig gebaut. In der Mitte der …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Leicester — (spr. lestĕr). 1) Grafschaft in Mittelengland, 2133 qkm, (1901) 433.994 E.; Viehzucht (Leicesterrind, Leicesterschaf), Wollstrumpfmanufaktur. – 2) Hauptstadt der engl. Grafsch. L., am schiffbaren Soar und Leicesterkanal, (1904) 224.186 E.; früher …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Leicester [2] — Leicester (spr. lestĕr), Robert Dudley, Graf von, Günstling der Königin Elisabeth von England, geb. 1532 oder 1533, Sohn von John Dudley (s.d.), Herzog von Northumberland, in erster Ehe 1550 mit Amy Robsart, deren plötzlicher Tod (1560) ihm… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.