league


league
league1
/leeg/, n., v., leagued, leaguing.
n.
1. a covenant or compact made between persons, parties, states, etc., for the promotion or maintenance of common interests or for mutual assistance or service.
2. the aggregation of persons, parties, states, etc., associated in such a covenant or compact; confederacy.
3. an association of individuals having a common goal.
4. a group of athletic teams organized to promote mutual interests and to compete chiefly among themselves: a bowling league.
5. Sports.
a. See major league.
b. See minor league.
6. group; class; category: As a pianist he just simply isn't in your league.
7. in league, working together, often secretly or for a harmful purpose; united.
v.t., v.i.
8. to unite in a league; combine.
[1425-75; earlier leage < It lega, n. deriv. of legare < L ligare to bind; r. late ME ligg < MF ligue < It liga, var. of lega]
Syn. 1. See alliance. 2. combination, coalition.
league2
/leeg/, n.
1. a unit of distance, varying at different periods and in different countries, in English-speaking countries usually estimated roughly at 3 miles (4.8 kilometers).
2. a square league, as a unit of land measure.
[1350-1400; ME lege, leuge < LL leuga a Gaulish unit of distance equal to 1.5 Roman miles, appar. < Gaulish; r. OE leowe < LL, as above]

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(as used in expressions)
Separatist League
Anti Corn Law League
League of Arab States
Augsburg League of
Cambrai League of
Corinth League of
League of the Iroquois
All India Muslim League
Three Emperors' League
League for the Independence of Vietnam

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      any of several European units of measurement ranging from 2.4 to 4.6 statute miles (3.9 to 7.4 km). In English-speaking countries the land league is generally accepted as 3 statute miles (4.83 km), although varying lengths from 7,500 feet to 15,000 feet (2.29 to 4.57 km) were sometimes employed. An ancient unit derived from the Gauls and introduced into England by the Normans (Norman Conquest), the league was estimated by the Romans to be equal to 1,500 paces—a pace, or passus, in Roman measure being nearly 5 feet (1.5 metres).

      Land leagues of about 2.63 miles (4.23 km) were used by the Spanish in early surveys of parts of the American Southwest. At one time the term was also used as a unit of area measurement. Old California surveys show square leagues equal to 4,439 acres (acre) (1,796 hectares (hectare)). In the late 18th century the league also came to refer to the distance a cannon shot could be fired at menacing ships offshore. This resulted in the 3-mile offshore territorial limit.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • League — may refer to: League (unit), obsolete unit of length of an hour s walk, usually equal to three miles Roman league, one of the ancient Roman units of measurement, approximately 1.5 miles Rugby league a full contact football code National Rugby… …   Wikipedia

  • league — W2 [li:g] n [Sense: 1 5; Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: ligue agreement to act together , from Old Italian liga, from ligare to tie ] [Sense: 6; Date: 1300 1400; : Late Latin; Origin: leuga] 1.) a group of sp …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • League — (l[=e]g), n. [F. ligue, LL. liga, fr. L. ligare to bind; cf. Sp. liga. Cf. {Ally} a confederate, {Ligature}.] 1. An alliance or combination of two or more nations, parties, organizations, or persons, for the accomplishment of a purpose which… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • league — Ⅰ. league [1] ► NOUN 1) a collection of people, countries, or groups that combine for mutual protection or cooperation. 2) a group of sports clubs which play each other over a period for a championship. 3) a class of quality or excellence: the… …   English terms dictionary

  • League — (l[=e]g), n. [Cf. OE. legue, lieue, a measure of length, F. lieue, Pr. lega, legua, It. & LL. lega, Sp. legua, Pg. legoa, legua; all fr. LL. leuca, of Celtic origin: cf. Arm. leo, lev (perh. from French), Ir. leige (perh. from English); also Ir.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • League — League, v. t. To join in a league; to cause to combine for a joint purpose; to combine; to unite; as, common interests will league heterogeneous elements. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • League — League, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Leagued}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Leaguing}.] [Cf. F. se liguer. See 2d {League}.] To unite in a league or confederacy; to combine for mutual support; to confederate. South. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • league — [n1] association, federation alliance, band, bunch, circle, circuit, club, coalition, combination, combine, compact, company, confederacy, confederation, conference, consortium, crew, gang, group, guild, loop, mob, order, organization, outfit,… …   New thesaurus

  • league — league1 [lēg] n. [ME ligg < OFr ligue < It liga < legare, to bind < L ligare: see LIGATURE] 1. a compact or covenant made by nations, groups, or individuals for promoting common interests, assuring mutual protection, etc. 2. an… …   English World dictionary

  • League — (spr. Libk), 3 englische Seemeilen (Sea Miles) = 0,75 deutsche Meile; also der 20. Theil eines Äquatorialgrades …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • League — (spr. līgh), engl. und nordamerikan. Wegemaß zu 3 Miles; dann auch soviel wie Liga, Bund …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon


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