Lamb


Lamb
/lam/, n.
1. Charles ("Elia"), 1775-1834, English essayist and critic.
2. Harold A., 1892-1962, U.S. novelist.
3. Mary Ann, 1764-1847, English author who wrote in collaboration with her brother Charles Lamb.
4. William, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, 1779-1848, English statesman: prime minister 1834, 1835-41.
5. Willis E(ugene), Jr., born 1913, U.S. physicist: Nobel prize 1955.

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I
Live sheep before the age of one year, and the flesh of such animals.

The flesh of the mature ram or ewe at least one year old is called mutton; the meat of sheep 12–20 months old may be called yearling mutton. The meat of sheep 6–10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb comes from sheep 5–6 months old. The primary lamb-and mutton-consuming countries (on a per capita basis) are New Zealand and Australia.
II
(as used in expressions)
lamb's ears
lamb's ear
Lamb Charles
Melbourne of Kilmore William Lamb 2nd Viscount

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meat
      live sheep before the age of one year, and the flesh of such animals. mutton refers to the flesh of the mature ram or ewe at least one year old; the meat of sheep between 12 and 20 months old may be called yearling mutton. The meat of sheep 6 to 10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb is from sheep of five to six months.

      The mild flavour of lamb is preferred in most Western countries; the stronger flavour of mutton is considered desirable in many Middle and Far Eastern countries. Milk-fed lamb is especially delicate in flavour. The colour of the lean deepens as the animal grows older. In the lamb it ranges from light to dark pink; in yearling mutton it is medium pink to light red; in mutton it is light to dark red in colour. The fat, soft and creamy white to pale pink in the lamb, hardens and whitens in older sheep. Bones also harden and whiten, becoming porous in the yearling and extremely hard in the mature animal.

      In the United States the carcass may be separated into sides and then divided into wholesale cuts; it may be cut straight across into saddles; or it may be cut into leg, loin, shoulder, breast, and shank. The outer fat covering, or fell, may be removed from the cuts. U.S. quality grades for lamb include prime, choice, good, utility, and cull; mature mutton grades are choice, good, utility, and cull.

      The primary lamb- and mutton-consuming countries (on a per capita basis) are New Zealand, Australia, Greece, Uruguay, and Ireland. The leg, saddle (upper back portion of the carcass from last rib to legs), and shoulder, although they contain higher proportions of bone to meat, are considered the finest cuts by some cooks. In the United States popular cuts include individual chops from the ribs or loin, the leg, and the so-called crown roast, made by forming the rib section, or rack, into a circle. A regional specialty, virtually unknown outside of the state of Kentucky, is barbecued mutton. Curried mutton, served with rice, is a favourite dish of Jamaicans.

      The traditional British lamb roast is distinguished by a fresh mint sauce. Lamb also plays an important part in classic French cuisine; unlike American- or English-style preparation, however, French recipes often call for shorter cooking times, yielding rare or pinkish meat.

      Lamb predominates in the cuisines of Greece, Turkey, and the Middle East, commonly marinated and roasted on a skewer (shish kebab) or cooked with local vegetables. A classic Middle Eastern dish is kibbe, a mixture of ground lamb and cracked wheat.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Lamb — heißen die Orte in den Vereinigten Staaten: Lamb (Indiana) Lamb Township (Scott County, Arkansas) The Lamb, Insel Lamb bezeichnet außerdem eine englische Band, siehe Lamb (Band) Lamb ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Alfred William Lamb… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lamb — most commonly refers to: * A young domestic sheep * Lamb and mutton, the meat of a sheep,Lamb or LAMB may also refer to: * Lamb (surname), a surname (and list of people with that name) * Lamb., botanical author abbreviation of Aylmer Bourke… …   Wikipedia

  • Lamb — Lamb, n. [AS. lamb; akin to D. & Dan. lam, G. & Sw. lamm, OS., Goth., & Icel. lamb.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) The young of the sheep. [1913 Webster] 2. Any person who is as innocent or gentle as a lamb. [1913 Webster] 3. A simple, unsophisticated person; in …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb — Datos generales Origen Mánchester, Inglaterra, Reino Unido Inf …   Wikipedia Español

  • Lamb —   [læm],    1) Charles, englischer Schriftsteller, * London 10. 2. 1775, ✝ Edmonton (heute zu London) 27. 12. 1834; 1792 1825 Beamter der East India Company. Mit seiner Schwester Mary (* 1764, ✝ 1847) veröffentlichte Lamb Nacherzählungen für… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • lamb — (n.) O.E. lamb lamb, from P.Gmc. *lambaz (Cf. O.N., O.Fris., Goth. lamb, M.Du., Du. lam, M.H.G. lamp, Ger. Lamm lamb ). Common to the Germanic languages, but with no certain cognates outside them. O.E. plural was lomberu. Applied to persons… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Lamb — (в пер. с англ. ягнёнок, читается «лэм»): Lamb  британский музыкальный дуэт. Lamb  альбом группы Lamb …   Википедия

  • LAMB (C.) — LAMB CHARLES (1775 1834) Poète et essayiste, Lamb est l’inverse d’Hazlitt, par le rayonnement de sa générosité et de sa bonté, par son humour, refuge d’une sensibilité qui côtoie sans cesse le déséquilibre, le sien et surtout celui de sa sœur… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • lamb — [lam] n. [ME < OE, akin to Ger lamm (OHG lamb) < IE * lonbhos (< base * el : see ELK) > Goth lamb] 1. a young sheep 2. the flesh of a young sheep, used as food 3. lambskin 4. a gentle or innocent person, particularly a child …   English World dictionary

  • Lamb — Lamb, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Lambed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Lambing}.] To bring forth a lamb or lambs, as sheep. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lamb — Lamb, Charles Lamb, Willis E …   Enciclopedia Universal


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