Kaddish


Kaddish
Ashk. Heb. /kah"dish/; Seph. Heb. /kah deesh"/, n., pl. Kaddishim Ashk. Heb. /kah dish"im/; Seph. Heb. /kah dee sheem"/. Judaism.
1. (italics) a liturgical prayer, consisting of three or six verses, recited at specified points during each of the three daily services and on certain other occasions.
2. (italics) Also called Mourner's Kaddish. the five-verse form of this prayer that is recited at specified points during each of the three daily services by one observing the mourning period of 11 months, beginning on the day of burial, for a deceased parent, sibling, child, or spouse, and by one observing the anniversary of such a death.
3. Kaddishim, persons who recite this prayer.
[1605-15; < Aram qaddish holy (one)]

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Jewish doxology (hymn of praise to God) that is usually recited in Aramaic at the end of principal sections of all synagogue services.

Originally recited in the rabbinical academies, it later became a regular feature of the synagogue service. The prayer expresses, in addition to the praise of God, the plea for the speedy realization of the messianic age. The prayer's association with the arrival of the messiah and the resurrection of the dead led to its becoming the prayer of mourners. There are four other forms of the Kaddish used in worship services.

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also spelled  Qaddish 

      in Judaism, a doxology (hymn of praise to God) that is usually recited in Aramaic at the end of principal sections of all synagogue services. The nucleus of the prayer is the phrase “Glorified and sanctified be God's great name throughout the world which He has created according to His will. May He establish His kingdom in your lifetime and during your days.” The congregation responds: “May His great name be blessed forever to all eternity.” The prayer's main idea goes back to ancient times and is reflected in the Lord's Prayer of Christians.

      Originally the Kaddish was recited in the rabbinical academies at the conclusion of public study or after the sermon of the preacher. In time it became a regular feature of the synagogue service. The prayer expresses, in addition to the praise of God, the plea for the speedy realization of the messianic age; and, because the resurrection of the dead is associated with the coming of the Messiah, the Kaddish eventually became the prayer of mourners. It is recited by the mourners for a period of 11 months and one day after the death of a parent or close relative. There are longer and shorter forms of the Kaddish.

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