Jacob


Jacob
/jay"keuhb/ for 1, 3; Fr. /zhann kawb"/ for 2, n.
1. the second son of Isaac, the twin brother of Esau, and father of the 12 patriarchs. Gen. 25:24-34.
2. François /frddahonn swann"/, born 1920, French geneticist: Nobel prize for medicine 1965.
3. a male given name: from a Hebrew word meaning "supplanter."

* * *

I
Hebrew patriarch, son of Isaac and grandson of Abraham, and the traditional ancestor of the people of Israel.

His story is told in the Book of Genesis. The younger twin brother of Esau, he used trickery to gain Isaac's blessing and Esau's birthright. On a journey to Canaan he wrestled all night with an angel, who blessed him and gave him the name Israel. Jacob had 13 children, 10 of whom founded tribes of Israel. His favorite son, Joseph, was sold into slavery in Egypt by his brothers, but the family was later reunited when a famine forced the brothers to go to Egypt to seek grain.
II
(as used in expressions)
Alfasi Isaac ben Jacob
Astor John Jacob
Berzelius Jöns Jacob Baron
Burckhardt Jacob Christopher
Camerarius Rudolph Jacob
Epstein Sir Jacob
Frank Jacob
Jacob Leibowicz
Jacob Gershvin
Grimm Jacob Ludwig Carl and Wilhelm Carl
Henle Friedrich Gustav Jacob
Jacob François
Jordaens Jacob
Lawrence Jacob
Leisler Jacob
Chaim Jacob Lipchitz
Jacob Offenbach
Perkins Jacob
Pissarro Jacob Abraham Camille
Riis Jacob August
Ruisdael Jacob Isaakszoon van
Schiff Jacob Henry
Schleiden Mathias Jacob
Arthur Jacob Arshawsky

* * *

▪ Hebrew patriarch
Hebrew  Yaʿaqov,  Arabic  Yaʿqūb,  also called  Israel,  Hebrew  Yisraʾel,  Arabic  Isrāʾīl,  

      Hebrew patriarch who was the grandson of Abraham, the son of Isaac and Rebekah, and the traditional ancestor of the people of Israel. Stories about Jacob in the Bible begin at Genesis 25:19.

      According to the Old Testament, Jacob was the younger twin brother of Esau, who was the ancestor of Edom and the Edomites. The two are representatives of two different grades of social order, Jacob being a pastoralist and Esau a nomadic hunter. During her pregnancy, Rebekah was told by God that she would give birth to twins; each of them would found a great nation, and Esau, the elder, would serve his younger brother. As it turned out, Jacob, by means of an elaborate double deception, managed to obtain his older brother's birthright from their father. Jacob then fled his brother's wrath and went to take refuge with the Aramaean tribe of his ancestors at Haran in Mesopotamia.

      Along his journey Jacob received a special revelation from God; God promised Jacob lands and numerous offspring that would prove to be the blessing of the entire Earth. Jacob named the place where he received his vision Bethel (“House of God”). Arriving at his uncle Laban's home in Haran, Jacob fell in love with his cousin Rachel. He worked for her father, Laban, for seven years to obtain Rachel's hand in marriage, but then Laban substituted his older daughter, Leah, for Rachel at the wedding ceremony. Unwittingly married to Leah, Jacob was thus compelled to serve Laban for another seven years so that he could take his beloved Rachel as his wife as well. Jacob then served Laban for another six years, during which he amassed a large amount of property; he then set out with his wives and children to return to Palestine. On the way Jacob wrestled with a mysterious stranger, a divine being, who changed Jacob's name to Israel. Jacob then met and was reconciled with Esau and settled in Canaan.

      Jacob had 13 children, 10 of whom were founders of tribes of Israel. Leah bore him his only daughter, Dinah, and six sons—Reuben, Simeon, Levi (who did not found a tribe, but was the ancestor of the Levites), Judah (from whom a tribe and the Davidic monarchy were descended), Issachar, and Zebulun. Leah's maidservant, Zilpah, bore him Gad and Asher, and Rachel's maidservant, Bilhah, bore him Dan and Naphtali. Rachel's sons were Benjamin and Joseph (who did not found a tribe, but whose sons founded the tribes of Manasseh and Ephraim).

      The story of Jacob's later years more properly belongs to the story of Joseph (q.v.). Late in his life, a famine prompted Jacob and his sons to migrate to Egypt, where he was reunited with his son Joseph, who had disappeared some years before. Israel died in Egypt at the age of 147 years and was buried in Canaan at Hebron.

      The stories about Jacob's birth and his acquisition of the birthright (Genesis 25:19–34; 27) provide a thinly veiled apology for the relation between Edom (Esau) and Israel in Davidic times. Edom, the older nation, was made subject to Israel by David (2 Samuel 8:8ff.). The Jacob stories assume and emphasize that all things occur by divine design. The divine objective is of overriding significance; it is God's will that Esau (Edom) shall live in the desert and be subject to Israel.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • JACOB — (Heb. יַעֲקֹב ,יַעֲקוֹב), younger twin son of isaac and rebekah , third of the patriarchs of the people of Israel. His father was 60 years old at the time of Jacob s birth, which occurred after 20 years of childless marriage (Gen. 25:20, 26).… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Jacob's — is a brand name for several lines of biscuits and crackers. The brand name in the United Kingdom is owned by United Biscuits while the brand name in Ireland is owned by the Jacob Fruitfield Food Group.HistoryThe originator of the Jacob s brand… …   Wikipedia

  • Jacob — o Ya akov, en hebreo יַעֲקֹב sostenido por el talón o en árabe يعقوب Yaʿqūb, conocido despues como Israel hebreo יִשְׂרָאֵל Principe de Dios , árabe اسرائيل Isrāʾīl) es uno de los patriarcas de la Biblia. Su historia es contada en el libro de… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • JACOB — Nom du patriarche qui, dans la tradition biblique définitivement sertie (l’unité religieuse et l’unité politique s’étant de concert façonnées, les douze tribus vénèrent ce personnage comme leur père commun), est présenté comme l’ancêtre éponyme… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Jacob — • The son of Isaac and Rebecca, third great patriarch of the chosen people, and the immediate ancestor of the twelve tribes of Israel Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Jacob     Jacob …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Jacob — (Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Standard ), Judah (), Naphtali (), Issachar (), and Benjamin (), this is seen as a foreshadowing of the blessings Christians believe resulted from Jesus death on the cross.IslamIn Arabic, Jacob is known as Yakub . He is revered… …   Wikipedia

  • Jacob 52 — Tres Yak 52 de la Asociación Jacob 52 en formación sobre el aeródromo de Ses Salines, en Mallorca. Activa 2003 actualidad …   Wikipedia Español

  • Jacob — ist ein männlicher Vorname, siehe Jacob (Vorname) ein Familienname; siehe Jacob (Familienname) der tropische Wirbelsturm Jacob siehe auch: Jacob Sisters, deutsches Gesangsquartett Jacobs Zimmer, Virginia Woolf Der Wahre Jacob, Zeitschrift Jacob s …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • JACOB (M.) — Personnage insolite de la génération qui, dans les débuts de ce siècle, a inventé une sensibilité nouvelle, Max Jacob est connu surtout comme recréateur du poème en prose: or, cela ne va pas sans injustice contre le reste de son œuvre poétique et …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Jacob — Ja cob, n. [Cf. F. Jacob. See 2d {Jack}.] A Hebrew patriarch (son of Isaac, and ancestor of the Jews), who in a vision saw a ladder reaching up to heaven ( Gen. xxviii. 12); also called {Israel}. [1913 Webster] And Jacob said . . . with my staff… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • JACOB (F.) — JACOB FRANÇOIS (1920 ) Après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, François Jacob termine ses études de médecine et soutient sa thèse de doctorat à Paris en 1947. Ne pouvant faire de chirurgie à cause de ses blessures, il s’essaie à différentes disciplines …   Encyclopédie Universelle


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.