internal-combustion engine


internal-combustion engine
an engine of one or more working cylinders in which the process of combustion takes place within the cylinders.
[1880-85]

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Any engine in which a fuel-air mixture is burned in the engine proper so that the hot gaseous products of combustion act directly on the surfaces of its moving parts, such as those of pistons (see piston and cylinder) or turbine rotor blades.

Internal-combustion engines include gasoline engines, diesel engines, gas turbine engines, pure jet engines, and rocket engines and motors, and are one class of heat engines. They are commonly divided into continuous-combustion engines and intermittent-combustion engines. In the first type (e.g., jet engines) fuel and air flow steadily into the engine, where a stable flame is maintained for continuous combustion. In the second (e.g., gasoline–reciprocating-piston engines), discrete quantities of fuel and air are periodically ignited. See also automobile industry, machine, steam engine.

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      any of a group of devices in which the reactants of combustion (oxidizer and fuel) and the products of combustion serve as the working fluids of the engine. Such an engine gains its energy from heat released during the combustion of the nonreacted working fluids, the oxidizer-fuel mixture. This process occurs within the engine and is part of the thermodynamic cycle of the device. Useful work generated by an internal-combustion (IC) engine results from the hot gaseous products of combustion acting on moving surfaces of the engine, such as the face of a piston, a turbine blade, or a nozzle.

      Internal-combustion engines are the most broadly applied and widely used power-generating devices currently in existence. Examples include gasoline engines (gasoline engine), diesel engines (diesel engine), gas-turbine engines (gas-turbine engine), and rocket-propulsion systems.

      Internal-combustion engines are divided into two groups: continuous-combustion engines and intermittent-combustion engines. The continuous-combustion engine is characterized by a steady flow of fuel and oxidizer into the engine. A stable flame is maintained within the engine (e.g., jet engine). The intermittent-combustion engine is characterized by periodic ignition of air and fuel and is commonly referred to as a reciprocating engine. Discrete volumes of air and fuel are processed in a cyclic manner. Gasoline piston engines and diesel engines are examples of this second group.

      Internal-combustion engines can be delineated in terms of a series of thermodynamic events. In the continuous-combustion engine, the thermodynamic events occur simultaneously as the oxidizer and fuel and the products of combustion flow steadily through the engine. In the intermittent-combustion engine, by contrast, the events occur in succession and are repeated for each full cycle.

      With the exception of rockets (both solid rocket motors and liquid-propellant rocket engines), internal-combustion engines ingest air, then either compress the air and introduce fuel into the air or introduce fuel and compress the air-fuel mixture. Then, common to all internal-combustion engines, the air-fuel mixture is burned, work is extracted from the expansion of the hot gaseous products of combustion, and ultimately the products of combustion are released through the exhaust system. Their operation can be contrasted with that of external-combustion engines (e.g., steam engines (steam engine)), in which the working fluid does not chemically react and energy gain is achieved solely through heat transfer to the working fluid by way of a heat exchanger.

      The most common internal-combustion engine is the four-stroke, gasoline-powered, homogeneous-charge, spark-ignition engine. This is because of its outstanding performance as a prime mover in the ground transportation industry. Spark-ignition engines also are used in the aeronautics industry; however, aircraft gas turbines have become the prime movers in this sector because of the emphasis of the aeronautics industry on range, speed, and passenger comfort. The domain of internal-combustion engines also includes such exotic devices as supersonic combustion ramjet engines (scramjets), as typified by the space plane, and sophisticated rocket engines and motors, such as those used on U.S. space shuttles and other space vehicles.

Charles Lafayette Proctor II
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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