intention


intention
intentionless, adj.
/in ten"sheuhn/, n.
1. an act or instance of determining mentally upon some action or result.
2. the end or object intended; purpose.
3. intentions,
a. purpose or attitude toward the effect of one's actions or conduct: a bungler with good intentions.
b. purpose or attitude with respect to marriage: Our friends are beginning to ask what our intentions are.
4. the act or fact of intending.
5. Logic.
a. Also called first intention, primary intention. reference by signs, concepts, etc., to concrete things, their properties, classes, or the relationships among them.
b. Also called second intention, secondary intention. reference to properties, classes, or the relationships among first intentions.
6. Surg., Med. a manner or process of healing, as in the healing of a lesion or fracture without granulation (healing by first intention) or the healing of a wound by granulation after suppuration (healing by second intention).
7. meaning or significance: The intention of his words was clear.
8. the person or thing meant to benefit from a prayer or religious offering.
9. Archaic. intentness.
[1300-50; ME intencio(u)n < L intention- (s. of intentio). See INTENT2, -ION]
Syn. 2. goal. INTENTION, INTENT, PURPOSE all refer to a wish that one means to carry out. INTENTION is the general word: His intention is good. INTENT is chiefly legal or literary: attack with intent to kill. PURPOSE implies having a goal or determination to achieve something: Her strong sense of purpose is reflected in her studies.

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In Scholastic logic and psychology, a concept used to describe a mode of being or relation between a mind and an object.

In knowing, the mind is said to "intend" or "tend toward" its object, and a thing as known, or in the knowing mind, has "intentional being," as with squaring the circle, which, though impossible, can be an object of intention. In action theory, intention is taken in a different but related sense, as in acting with the intention of accomplishing a specific purpose. An important question in action theory is that of the relation between having a specific intention in doing something and doing the same thing intentionally. Is an intention necessary for intentional action and, if so, is it a cause of such action or some other kind of ground of it?

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logic
      (Latin: intentio), in scholastic logic and psychology, a concept used to describe a mode of being or relation. In knowing, the mind is said to “intend” or “tend toward” its object, and a thing as known, or in the knowing mind, has “intentional being.” Intention may mean either the mind knowing or the knowledge itself, analogous to the use of perception for the act of perceiving or for the thing perceived. First intention is knowledge of a thing as it is in itself; second intention, knowledge of the thing as known. Thus, the term man is in first intention in the statement “man is mortal,” but in second intention in “man is a species.” Logic was held by the scholastics to consist of the study of second intentions.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • intention — [ ɛ̃tɑ̃sjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1190; lat. intentio 1 ♦ Fait de se proposer un certain but. ⇒ dessein, idée, projet. Intention et action, et passage à l acte. ♢ Dr. Volonté consciente de commettre un fait prohibé par la loi. Commettre un acte avec l… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Intention — • An act of the will by which that faculty efficaciously desires to reach an end by employing the means Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Intention     Intention      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • intention — INTENTION. s. f. Dessein, mouvement de l ame par lequel on tend, on vise à quelque fin. Bonne intention. mauvaise intention. droite, loüable intention. il a intention, l intention de faire quelque chose. mon intention n estoit pas de vous… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • intention — in·ten·tion /in ten chən/ n: something intended: intent the intention of the testator ◇ Intent is more commonly used than intention when speaking technically esp. about the criminal and tort concepts of intent (senses 1a and 1b). Merriam… …   Law dictionary

  • Intention — In*ten tion, n. [F. intention, L. intentio. See {Intend}, and cf. {Intension}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A stretching or bending of the mind toward an object; closeness of application; fixedness of attention; earnestness. [1913 Webster] Intention is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intention — intention, intent, purpose, design, aim, end, object, objective, goal are comparable when meaning what one proposes to accomplish or to attain by doing or making something, in distinction from what prompts one (the motive), or from the activity… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • intention — is followed either by of + verbal noun or by a to infinitive, the first of these being somewhat more common and the second influenced by the verb intend: • I have no intention no present intention of standing for Parliament Harold Macmillan, 1979 …   Modern English usage

  • Intention — Sf Absicht, Bestreben per. Wortschatz fremd. Erkennbar fremd (16. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus l. intentio ( ōnis), einem Abstraktum zu l. intendere (intentum) hinwenden, anschicken, sein Streben auf etwas richten , zu l. tendere (tentum,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • intention — [in ten′shən] n. [ME entencioun < OFr entencion < L intentio < pp. of intendere] 1. the act or fact of intending; determination to do a specified thing or act in a specified manner 2. a) anything intended or planned; aim, end, or purpose …   English World dictionary

  • Intention — (v. lat.), Absicht, Zweck; daher Intentioniren, beabsichtigen. Intentionalismus, Glaube, daß der Zweck (Intention) die Mittel heilige. Intentionalität, Absichtlichkeit …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Intention — (lat.), Absicht, Vorhaben, Zweck (nicht zu verwechseln mit Intension, s. d.) …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon


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