insecticide


insecticide
insecticidal, adj.
/in sek"teuh suyd'/, n.
1. a substance or preparation used for killing insects.
2. the act of killing insects.
[1860-65; INSECT + -I- + -CIDE]

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Any of a large group of substances used to kill insects.

Such substances are mainly used to control pests that infest cultivated plants and crops or to eliminate disease-carrying insects in specific areas. Inorganic insecticides include arsenic, lead, and copper compounds. Some organic insecticides are natural, such as rotenone, pyrethrins, and nicotine (see toxin). Others are synthetic, such as chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., DDT, dieldrin, lindane); carbamates, related to urea (e.g., carbaryl, carbofuran); and parathions, organic phosphorus esters. Insect hormones may be included as a class. Insecticides may affect the nervous system, inhibit essential enzymes, or prevent larvae from maturing (e.g., juvenile hormone). Some are stomach poisons, some inhalation poisons, and others contact poisons. Agents such as inert oils act mechanically, simply blocking the breathing pores. Insecticides vary widely not only in effectiveness against target insects (which may develop resistance) but also in toxicity to nontarget species (including humans) and environmental effects; many of the worst (e.g., DDT) have been banned or their use curtailed.

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      any toxic substance that is used to kill insects. Such substances are used primarily to control pests that infest cultivated plants or to eliminate disease-carrying insects in specific areas.

      Insecticides can be classified in any of several ways, on the basis of their chemistry, their toxicological action, or their mode of penetration. In the latter scheme, they are classified according to whether they take effect upon ingestion (stomach poisons), inhalation (fumigants), or upon penetration of the body covering (contact poisons). Most synthetic organic insecticides penetrate by all three of these pathways, however, and hence are better distinguished from each other by their basic chemistry. Besides the synthetic organics, some organic compounds (organic compound) occurring naturally in plants are useful insecticides, as are some inorganic compounds. Most insecticides are sprayed or dusted onto plants and other surfaces traversed or fed upon by insects.

      Stomach poisons are toxic only if ingested through the mouth and are most useful against those insects that have biting or chewing mouth parts, such as caterpillars, beetles, and grasshoppers. The chief stomach poisons are the arsenicals (arsenic)—e.g., Paris green (copper acetoarsenite), lead arsenate, and calcium arsenate; and the fluorine compounds, among them sodium fluoride and cryolite. They are applied as sprays or dusts onto the leaves and stems of plants eaten by the target insects. Stomach poisons have gradually been replaced by synthetic organic insecticides, which are less dangerous to humans and other mammals.

      Contact poisons penetrate the skin of the pest and are used against those arthropods, such as aphids, that pierce the surface of a plant and suck out the juices. The contact insecticides can be divided into two main groups: naturally occurring compounds and synthetic organic ones. The naturally occurring contact insecticides include nicotine, developed from tobacco; pyrethrum, obtained from flowers of Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium; rotenone, from the roots of Derris species and related plants; and oils, from petroleum. Though these compounds were originally derived mainly from plant extracts, the toxic agents of some of them (e.g., pyrethrins) have been synthesized. Natural insecticides are usually short-lived on plants and cannot provide protection against prolonged invasions. Except for pyrethrum, they have largely been replaced by newer synthetic organic insecticides.

      The synthetic contact insecticides are now the primary agents of insect control. In general they penetrate insects readily and are toxic to a wide range of species. The main synthetic groups are the chlorinated hydrocarbons, organic phosphates (organophosphates), and carbamates.

      The chlorinated hydrocarbons were developed beginning in the 1940s after the discovery (1939) of the insecticidal properties of DDT (q.v.). Other examples of this series are BHC, lindane, Chlorobenzilate, methoxychlor, and the cyclodienes (which include aldrin, dieldrin, chlordane, heptachlor, and endrin). Some of these compounds are quite stable and have a long residual action; they are, therefore, particularly valuable where protection is required for long periods. Their toxic action is not fully understood, but they are known to disrupt the nervous system.

      The organophosphates are now the largest and most versatile class of insecticides. Two widely used compounds in this class are parathion and malathion; others are Diazinon, naled, methyl parathion, and dichlorvos. They are especially effective against sucking insects such as aphids and mites, which feed on plant juices. The chemicals' absorption into the plant is achieved either by spraying the leaves or by applying solutions impregnated with the chemicals to the soil, so that intake occurs through the roots. The organophosphates usually have little residual action and are important, therefore, where residual tolerances limit the choice of insecticides. They are generally much more toxic than the chlorinated hydrocarbons. Organophosphates kill insects by inhibiting the enzyme cholinesterase, which is essential in the functioning of the nervous system.

      The carbamates are a relatively new group of insecticides that includes such compounds as carbamyl, methomyl, and carbofuran. They are rapidly detoxified and eliminated from animal tissues. Their toxicity is thought to arise from a mechanism somewhat similar to that for the organophosphates.

      Fumigants (fumigant) are toxic compounds that enter the respiratory system of the insect through its spiracles, or breathing openings. They include such chemicals as hydrogen cyanide, naphthalene, nicotine, and methyl bromide and are used mainly for killing insect pests of stored products or for fumigating nursery stock.

      The advent of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-20th century made the control of insects and other arthropod pests much more effective, and such chemicals remain essential in modern agriculture despite their environmental drawbacks. By preventing crop losses, raising the quality of produce, and lowering the cost of farming, modern insecticides increased crop yields by as much as 50 percent in some regions of the world in the period 1945–65. They have also been important in improving the health of both humans and domestic animals; malaria, yellow fever, and typhus, among other infectious diseases, have been greatly reduced in many areas of the world through their use.

      But the use of insecticides has also resulted in several serious problems, chief among them environmental contamination and the development of resistance in pest species. Because insecticides are poisonous (poison) compounds, they may adversely affect other organisms besides harmful insects. The accumulation of some insecticides in the environment can in fact pose a serious threat to both wildlife and humans. Many insecticides are short-lived or are metabolized by the animals that ingest them, but some are persistent, and when applied in large amounts they pervade the environment. When an insecticide is applied, much of it reaches the soil, and groundwater can also become contaminated from direct application or runoff from treated areas. The main soil contaminants are the chlorinated hydrocarbons such as DDT, aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor, and BHC. Owing to repeated sprayings, these chemicals can accumulate in soils in surprisingly large amounts (10–100 pounds per acre), and their effect on wildlife is greatly increased as they become associated with food chains. The stability of DDT and its relatives leads to their accumulation in the bodily tissues of insects that constitute the diet of other animals higher up the food chain, with toxic effects on the latter. Birds of prey such as eagles, hawks, and falcons are usually most severely affected, and serious declines in their populations have been traced to the effects of DDT and its relatives. Consequently, the use of such chemicals began to be restricted in the 1960s and banned outright in the 1970s in many countries.

      Cases of insecticide poisoning of humans also occur occasionally, and the use of one common organophosphate, parathion, was drastically curtailed in the United States in 1991 owing to its toxic effects on farm labourers who were directly exposed to it.

      Another problem with insecticides is the tendency of some target insect populations to develop resistance as their susceptible members are killed off and those resistant strains that survive multiply, eventually perhaps to form a majority of the population. Resistance denotes a formerly susceptible insect population that can no longer be controlled by a pesticide at normally recommended rates. Hundreds of species of harmful insects have acquired resistance to different synthetic organic pesticides, and strains that become resistant to one insecticide may also be resistant to a second that has a similar mode of action to the first. Once resistance has developed, it tends to persist in the absence of the pesticide for varying amounts of time, depending on the type of resistance and the species of pest. Insecticides may also encourage the growth of harmful insect populations by eliminating the natural enemies that previously held them in check. The nonspecific nature of broad-spectrum chemicals makes them more likely to have such unintended effects on the abundance of both harmful and beneficial insects.

      Because of the problems associated with the heavy use of some chemical insecticides, current insect-control practice combines their use with biological methods in an approach called integrated control. In this approach, a minimal use of insecticide may be combined with the use of pest-resistant crop varieties; the use of crop-raising methods that inhibit pest proliferation; the release of organisms that are predators or parasites of the pest species; and the disruption of the pest's reproduction by the release of sterilized pests.

      See also chemosterilant; fumigant; miticide; pest.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • insecticide — [ ɛ̃sɛktisid ] adj. et n. m. • 1838; de insecte et cide ♦ Qui tue, détruit les insectes. Poudre insecticide. N. m. Le D.D.T. est un insecticide. Une bombe d insecticide. ● insecticide adjectif et nom masculin Se dit d un produit utilisé dans la… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Insecticide — In*sec ti*cide, n. [Insect + L. caedere to kill.] An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder or spray. {In*sec ti*ci dal}, a. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • insecticide — (n.) substance which kills insects, 1865, from INSECT (Cf. insect) + CIDE (Cf. cide) …   Etymology dictionary

  • insecticide — ► NOUN ▪ a substance used for killing insects. DERIVATIVES insecticidal adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • insecticide — [in sek′tə sīd΄] n. [< INSECT + CIDE] any substance used to kill insects insecticidal adj …   English World dictionary

  • Insecticide — Étymologiquement, les insecticides sont des substances actives ou des préparations ayant la propriété de tuer les insectes, leurs larves et/ou leurs œufs. Ils font partie de la famille des pesticides, eux mêmes inclus dans la famille des biocides …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Insecticide — For other uses, see Insecticide (disambiguation). An insecticide is a pesticide used against insects. They include ovicides and larvicides used against the eggs and larvae of insects respectively. Insecticides are used in agriculture, medicine,… …   Wikipedia

  • insecticide — Synonyms and related words: aborticide, acaricide, anthelmintic, antibiotic, antiseptic, bug bomb, carbamate insecticide, chemosterilant, chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, contact poison, defoliant, disinfectant, eradicant, fratricide,… …   Moby Thesaurus

  • insecticide — n. to spray, spread, use an insecticide * * * [ɪn sektɪsaɪd] spread use an insecticide to spray …   Combinatory dictionary

  • insecticide — [[t]ɪnse̱ktɪsaɪd[/t]] insecticides N MASS Insecticide is a chemical substance that is used to kill insects. Spray the plants with insecticide …   English dictionary


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