information science


information science
the study of the nature, collection, and management of information and of its uses, esp. involving computer storage and retrievals.

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Discipline that deals with the processes of storing and transferring information.

It attempts to bring together concepts and methods from such varied disciplines as library science, computer science and engineering, linguistics, and psychology to develop techniques and devices to aid in the handling of information. In its early stages in the 1960s, information science was concerned primarily with applying the then-new computer technology to the processing and managing of documents. The applied computer technologies and theoretical studies of information science have since permeated many other disciplines. Computer science and engineering still tend to absorb its theory-and technology-oriented subjects, and management science tends to absorb information-systems subjects.

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      discipline that deals with the processes of storing and transferring information. It attempts to bring together concepts and methods from various disciplines such as library science, computer science and engineering, linguistics, psychology, and other technologies in order to develop techniques and devices to aid in the handling—that is, in the collection, organization, storage, retrieval, interpretation, and use—of information.

      The transfer of information through time requires the existence of some storage medium, which is designated a document—hence the term documentation. Historically, “documentation” emerged as a distinct discipline in the early 20th century, paralleling the rise of empirical research, which was to provide its main source of subjects. The discipline grew in response to the growth of the periodical and the journal as the prevalent media for scientific reports. Whereas books required control through cataloging and classification, periodicals required indexes and abstracts that would bring together for the researcher primary information originally published in divergent sources.

      The roots of the discipline of information science lay in three post-World War II developments: the Shannon-Weaver information theory model, Norbert Wiener's conception of the science of cybernetics, and rapid advances in the design and production of electronic computers (computer). These innovations pointed to a new field of study in which many disciplines could be merged under the unifying idea of “information.” After the Georgia Institute of Technology established the first formal information science program in 1963, the discipline quickly developed at a number of other universities either as an independent field of study or as a specialty within such departments as library science, computer science, or engineering.

      In its early stages during the 1960s, information science was primarily concerned with applying the then-new computer technology to the processing and managing of documents. Modeling studies were undertaken of the effectiveness of information storage and retrieval; modes of human-machine interaction; the effect of form on the content and comprehension of information; the processes of information generation, transmission, and transformation; and the establishment of general principles that explain and predict information phenomena.

      The applied computer technologies—and more recently, the theoretical areas of study—of information science have since permeated many other disciplines and have even been appropriated by new fields, each preferring a more descriptive designation of its subject domain. The institutionalization of information science as a discrete discipline thus has not occurred, and the number of its scientist-practitioners is low. Computer science and engineering tend to absorb the theory- and technology-oriented subjects of the field, and management science tends to absorb the information systems subjects. Hundreds of professional associations do exist that are concerned with information-related disciplines, providing a forum where people can exchange ideas about information processing.

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Universalium. 2010.

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