inflection


inflection
inflectionless, adj.
/in flek"sheuhn/, n.
1. modulation of the voice; change in pitch or tone of voice.
2. Also, flection. Gram.
a. the process or device of adding affixes to or changing the shape of a base to give it a different syntactic function without changing its form class.
b. the paradigm of a word.
c. a single pattern of formation of a paradigm: noun inflection; verb inflection.
d. the change in the shape of a word, generally by affixation, by means of which a change of meaning or relationship to some other word or group of words is indicated.
e. the affix added to produce this change, as the -s in dogs or the -ed in played.
f. the systematic description of such processes in a given language, as in serves from serve, sings from sing, and harder from hard (contrasted with derivation).
3. a bend or angle.
4. Math. a change of curvature from convex to concave or vice versa.
Also, esp. Brit., inflexion.
[1525-35; var. sp. of inflexion < L inflexion- (s. of inflexio) a bending. See INFLECT, -ION]

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also called  Flection,  formerly  Accidence,  

      in linguistics, the change in the form of a word (in English, usually the addition of endings) to mark such distinctions as tense, person, number, gender, mood, voice, and case. English inflection indicates noun plural (cat, cats), third person singular present tense (I, you, we, they buy; he buys), past tense (we walk, we walked), verbals (called, calling), and comparatives (big, bigger, biggest). Changes within the stem, or main word part, are another type of inflection, as in sing, sang, sung and goose, geese. The paradigm of the Old Icelandic u-stem noun skjǫldr (“shield”), for example, includes forms with both internal change and suffixation; the nominative singular form is skjǫldr, the genitive singular is skjaldar, and the nominative plural is skildir. Many languages, such as Latin, Spanish, French, and German, have a much more extensive system of inflection. For example, Spanish shows verb distinction for person and number, “I, you, he, they live,” vivo, vives, vive, viven (“I live,” “you live,” “he lives,” “they live”). A number of languages, especially non-Indo-European ones, inflect with prefixes and infixes, word parts added before a main part or within the main part. Inflection differs from derivation in that it does not change the part of speech. Derivation uses prefixes and suffixes (e.g., in-, -tion) to form new words (e.g., inform, deletion), which can then take inflections.

      The terms inflecting and inflectional are sometimes used more narrowly in the typological classification of languages to refer to a subtype of synthetic language, such as Latin. All synthetic languages have inflection in the broader and more widespread sense of the term.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
, , , , , / (in declension or in conjugation), , , / (of the voice)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • inflection — 1. Inflection is the process by which words change their form by the addition of suffixes or other means in accordance with their grammatical role. Inflection of nouns usually involves the addition of s or es to form plurals (book / books, church …   Modern English usage

  • inflection — inflection, intonation, accent are comparable when they designate a particular manner of employing the tones of the voice in speech. Inflection implies change in pitch or tone; it often suggests a variation expressive of emotion or sentiment, and …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Inflection — In*flec tion, n. [L. inflexio : cf. F. inflexion. See {Inflect}.] [Written also {inflecxion}.] 1. The act of inflecting, or the state of being inflected. [1913 Webster] 2. A bend; a fold; a curve; a turn; a twist. [1913 Webster] 3. A slide,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • inflection — early 15c., from M.Fr. inflexion and directly from L. inflexionem (nom. inflexio) a bending, inflection, modification, noun of action from pp. stem of inflectere (see INFLECT (Cf. inflect)). For spelling, see CONNECTION (Cf. connection).… …   Etymology dictionary

  • inflection — [in flek′shən] n. [L inflexio < inflexus, pp. of inflectere: see INFLECT] 1. a turning, bending, or curving 2. a turn, bend, or curve 3. any change in tone or pitch of the voice; modulation [to signal a question by a rising inflection] 4. a… …   English World dictionary

  • inflection — I noun accent, accentuation, cadence, emphasis, expression, intonation, modulation, pitch, stress, tone, voice change associated concepts: demeanor of a witness, polygraph test II index intonation, stress (accent) …   Law dictionary

  • inflection — inflection, inflexion англ. [инфле/кшн] муз. интонация …   Словарь иностранных музыкальных терминов

  • inflection — [n] accent, intonation articulation, change, emphasis, enunciation, modulation, pitch, pronunciation, sound, timbre, tonality, tone, tone of voice, variation; concepts 65,595 Ant. monotone …   New thesaurus

  • inflection — (chiefly Brit. also inflexion) ► NOUN 1) Grammar a change in the form of a word (typically the ending) to express a grammatical function or attribute such as tense, mood, person, number, case, and gender. 2) a variation in intonation or pitch of… …   English terms dictionary

  • Inflection — In grammar, inflection or inflexion is the way language handles grammatical relations and relational categories such as tense, mood, voice, aspect, person, number, gender, case. In covert inflection, such categories are not overtly expressed.… …   Wikipedia


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