Imari ware


Imari ware
/i mahr"ee/
Japanese porcelain noted for its rich floral underglaze decoration in iron-red, blue, and gold, and later copied in China and Europe.
[1900-05 after a locale in western Saga prefecture (Kyushu) which was the sole market selling this porcelain during the Edo period]

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▪ Japanese porcelain
also called  Arita Ware,  

      Japanese porcelain made at the Arita kilns in Hizen province. Among the Arita porcelains are white glazed wares, pale gray-blue or gray-green glazed wares known as celadons, black wares, and blue-and-white wares with underglaze painting, as well as overglaze enamels. Following the late 16th-century expansion of glazed ceramic production, porcelain-like wares were introduced. Manufacture is said to date from 1616, when porcelain clays were discovered in Arita by Korean craftsmen under the master potter Ri Sampei (Yi Sam-p'yong). An advanced type of continuous step-chamber kiln, necessary for porcelain production, made it possible to achieve an efficient method of mass production.

      Porcelain manufacturing soon became a major industry in the region, fostered by the protection and strict monopoly policies of the Saga fief. The wares were shipped throughout the country and widely exported from the port of Imari by the Dutch East India Company to other parts of the world. Sometime before 1800, porcelain production had finally spread to other parts of Japan.

      In its formative period, Arita ware was affected by the impetus of Korean craftsmen and by the popularity of Chinese wares; but by the mid-17th century, native Japanese designs began to predominate, especially in the development of such overglaze enameled wares as Nabeshima, Kakiemon (Kakiemon ware), and Old Imari.

      Nabeshima ware first appeared in the late 17th century. It is characterized by pictorial decoration deriving from fabrics, the use of subjects favoured by the Kanō and Tosa schools of painting, and the employment of fashionable Edo-period decorative motifs. It is poised and highly refined, though sometimes rather lacking in vigour. Kakiemon, dating from the mid-17th century, was the first enameled ware to appear. Its designs are derived from the intimate, classical, purely Japanese style of painting known as Yamato-e. Old Imari, appearing in the 1640s, is perhaps the most striking for the sumptuousness of its ornamental colours and designs. Pictorial decoration generally covers the vessel completely. Purely decorative patterns deriving from fabric designs also appear, sometimes in combination with pictorial motifs.

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Universalium. 2010.

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