ID


ID
/uy"dee"/
1. a means of identification, as a card or bracelet containing official or approved identification information.
v.t. ID'd or IDed or ID'ed, ID'ing or IDing.
2. to identify.
3. to issue an ID to: Go to the admissions office if you haven't been ID'd yet.
1. Idaho (approved esp. for use with zip code).
2. Also, i.d. inside diameter.

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In Freudian psychoanalytic theory, one of the three aspects of the human personality, along with the ego and superego.

The id is the source of instinctual impulses such as sex and aggression as well as primitive needs that exist at birth. It is entirely nonrational and functions according to the pleasure-pain principle, seeking immediate fulfillment of its impulses whenever possible. Its working processes are completely unconscious in the adult, but it supplies the energy for conscious mental life, and it plays an especially important role in modes of expression that have a nonrational element, such as the making of art. The primary methods for unmasking its content, according to Sigmund Freud, are dream analysis and free association.

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      in Freudian (Freud, Sigmund) psychoanalytic theory, one of the three agencies of the human personality, along with the ego and superego (qq.v.). The oldest of these psychic realms in development, it contains the psychic content related to the primitive instincts of the body, notably sex and aggression, as well as all psychic material that is inherited and present at birth. The id (Latin for “it”) is oblivious of the external world and unaware of the passage of time. Devoid of organization, knowing neither logic nor reason, it has the ability to harbour acutely conflicting or mutually contradictory impulses side by side. It functions entirely according to the pleasure-pain principle, its impulses either seeking immediate fulfillment or settling for a compromise fulfillment. The id supplies the energy for the development and continued functioning of conscious mental life, though the working processes of the id itself are completely unconscious in the adult (less unconscious in the child). In waking life it belies its content in slips of the tongue, wit, art, and other at least partly nonrational modes of expression. The primary methods for unmasking its content, according to Freud, are the analysis of dreams and free association.

      Many psychoanalysts now consider the conception of an id overly simple, though still useful in drawing attention to the unconscious motivations and irrational impulses within even the most normal human being.

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Universalium. 2010.