Ho


Ho
holmium.

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(as used in expressions)
Ho peh
Ho fei
Ho nan
Ho shen
Hu ho hao t'e
O erh ku na Ho
Huang Ho
T'a li mu Ho
Cheng Ho

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Ghana
      town, southeastern Ghana. It is situated at the southern edge of the Akwapim-Togo Ranges. Ho was founded in the early 18th century during westward migrations of the Ewe people. Its agricultural basis was strengthened after 1870 by the development of German kola nut plantations and by expanding cacao cultivation. The town's modern commercial importance was ensured by the Volta Bridge (1957) at Adome, which connects Ho with Ghana's southern ports. A market centre, Ho also produces palm oil, cotton, and cocoa. It lies on a main road from the coast leading northeastward to Togo. The Ho Polytechnic was founded in 1968. Pop. (2000) 61,658.

people
also called  Larka Kol,  

      tribal people of the state of Bihār (Bihar) in India, concentrated in the area of Kolhān on the lower Chota Nāgpur Plateau. They numbered about 1,150,000 in the late 20th century, mostly in Bihār and Orissa states of northeastern India. They speak a language of the Munda family and appear to have moved gradually into their territory from farther north. Their traditional social organization includes features common to those of other Munda-speaking tribes, including the institution of girls' and boys' dormitories, an elaborate system of village offices, and a territorial organization into quasi-military confederations. They trace their descent through the paternal line, and young people are expected to marry outside the paternal clan, but there is a prevalent custom of marrying one's cousin on the maternal side. Marriage by elopement and by abduction are also traditionally common. The Ho worship spirits, some of which they believe to cause disease; they approach them through divination and witchcraft.

      The traditional economy of the Ho was hunting and a primitive, shifting agriculture. These pursuits have declined in favour of settled agriculture and livestock raising. Many of the men also work as labourers in mines and factories.

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Universalium. 2010.


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