heat


heat
heatable, adj.heatful, adj.heatless, adj.heatlike, adj.
/heet/, n.
1. the state of a body perceived as having or generating a relatively high degree of warmth.
2. the condition or quality of being hot: the heat of an oven.
3. the degree of hotness; temperature: moderate heat.
4. the sensation of warmth or hotness: unpleasant heat.
5. a bodily temperature higher than normal: the heat of a fever; the feeling of heat caused by physical exertion.
6. added or external energy that causes a rise in temperature, expansion, evaporation, or other physical change.
7. Physics. a nonmechanical energy transfer with reference to a temperature difference between a system and its surroundings or between two parts of the same system. Symbol: Q
8. a hot condition of the atmosphere or physical environment; hot season or weather.
9. a period of hot weather.
10. a sharp, pungent flavor, as that produced by strong spices.
11. warmth or intensity of feeling; vehemence; passion: He spoke with much heat and at great length.
12. maximum intensity in an activity, condition, etc.; the height of any action, situation, or the like: the heat of battle; the heat of passion.
13. extreme pressure, as of events, resulting in tension or strain: In the heat of his hasty departure he forgot his keys.
14. a single intense effort; a sustained, concentrated, and continuous operation: The painting was finished at a heat.
15. Slang. intensified pressure, esp. in a police investigation.
16. Slang. the police.
17. Slang. armed protection, esp. a pistol, revolver, or other firearm: All guards carry some heat.
18. Sports.
a. a single course in or division of a race or other contest.
b. a race or other contest in which competitors attempt to qualify for entry in the final race or contest.
19. Metall.
a. a single operation of heating, as of metal in a furnace, in the treating and melting of metals.
b. a quantity of metal produced by such an operation.
20. Zool.
a. sexual receptiveness in animals, esp. females.
b. the period or duration of such receptiveness: to be in heat.
v.t.
21. to make hot or warm (often fol. by up).
22. to excite emotionally; inflame or rouse with passion.
v.i.
23. to become hot or warm (often fol. by up).
24. to become excited emotionally.
25. heat up, to increase or become more active or intense: Business competition will heat up toward the end of the year.
[bef. 900; ME hete, OE haetu; akin to G Hitze; see HOT]
Syn. 2. hotness, warmth. 3. caloricity. 11. ardor, fervor, zeal, flush, fever, excitement, impetuosity. 22. stimulate, warm, stir, animate.
Ant. 1. coolness. 11. indifference. 21. cool.

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I
Energy transferred from one body to another as the result of a difference in temperature.

Heat flows from a hotter body to a colder body when the two bodies are brought together. This transfer of energy usually results in an increase in the temperature of the colder body and a decrease in that of the hotter body. A substance may absorb heat without an increase in temperature as it changes from one phase to another
that is, when it melts or boils. The distinction between heat (a form of energy) and temperature (a measure of the amount of energy) was clarified in the 19th century by such scientists as J.-B. Fourier, Gustav Kirchhoff, and Ludwig Boltzmann.
II
(as used in expressions)
heat treating
reaction heat of

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Introduction

      energy that is transferred from one body to another as the result of a difference in temperature. If two bodies at different temperatures are brought together, energy is transferred—i.e., heat flows—from the hotter body to the colder. The effect of this transfer of energy usually, but not always, is an increase in the temperature of the colder body and a decrease in the temperature of the hotter body. A substance may absorb heat without an increase in temperature by changing from one physical state (or phase) to another, as from a solid to a liquid (melting), from a solid to a vapour (sublimation), from a liquid to a vapour (boiling), or from one solid form to another (usually called a crystalline transition). The important distinction between heat and temperature (heat being a form of energy and temperature a measure of the amount of that energy present in a body) was clarified during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Heat as a form of energy.
      Because all of the many forms of energy, including heat, can be converted into work, amounts of energy are expressed in units of work, such as joules, foot-pounds, kilowatt-hours, or calories. Exact relationships exist between the amounts of heat added to or removed from a body and the magnitude of the effects on the state of the body. The two units of heat most commonly used are the calorie and the British thermal unit (BTU). The calorie (or gram-calorie) is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of water from 14.5° to 15.5° C; the BTU is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 63° to 64° F. One BTU is approximately 252 calories. Both definitions specify that the temperature changes are to be measured at a constant pressure of one atmosphere, because the amounts of energy involved depend in part on pressure. The calorie used in measuring the energy content of foods is the large calorie, or kilogram-calorie, equal to 1,000 gram-calories.

      In general, the amount of energy required to raise a unit mass of a substance through a specified temperature interval is called the heat capacity, or the specific heat, of that substance. The quantity of energy necessary to raise the temperature of a body one degree varies depending upon the restraints imposed. If heat is added to a gas confined at constant volume, the amount of heat needed to cause a one-degree temperature rise is less than if the heat is added to the same gas free to expand (as in a cylinder fitted with a movable piston) and so do work. In the first case, all the energy goes into raising the temperature of the gas, but in the second case, the energy not only contributes to the temperature increase of the gas but also provides the energy necessary for the work done by the gas on the piston. Consequently, the specific heat of a substance depends on these conditions. The most commonly determined specific heats are the specific heat at constant volume and the specific heat at constant pressure. The heat capacities of many solid elements were shown to be closely related to their atomic weights by the French scientists Pierre-Louis Dulong and Alexis-Thérèse Petit in 1819. The so-called law of Dulong and Petit was useful in determining the atomic weights of certain metallic elements, but there are many exceptions to it; the deviations were later found to be explainable on the basis of quantum mechanics.

      It is incorrect to speak of the heat in a body, because heat is restricted to energy being transferred. Energy stored in a body is not heat (nor is it work, as work is also energy in transit). It is customary, however, to speak of sensible and latent heat. The latent heat, also called the heat of vaporization, is the amount of energy necessary to change a liquid to a vapour at constant temperature and pressure. The energy required to melt a solid to a liquid is called the heat of fusion, and the heat of sublimation is the energy necessary to change a solid directly to a vapour, these changes also taking place under conditions of constant temperature and pressure.

      Air is a mixture of gases and water vapour, and it is possible for the water present in the air to change phase; i.e., it may become liquid (rain) or solid (snow). To distinguish between the energy associated with the phase change (the latent heat) and the energy required for a temperature change, the concept of sensible heat was introduced. In a mixture of water vapour and air, the sensible heat is the energy necessary to produce a particular temperature change excluding any energy required for a phase change.

      Because heat is energy in transition, some discussion of the mechanisms involved is pertinent. There are three modes of heat transfer, which can be described as (1) the transfer of heat by conduction in solids or fluids at rest, (2) the transfer of heat by convection in liquids or gases in a state of motion, combining conduction with fluid flow, and (3) the transfer of heat by radiation, which takes place with no material carrier. The flow of heat in metal bars was studied analytically by the French mathematician Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier (Fourier, Joseph, Baron) and measured by the French physicist Jean-Baptiste Biot (Biot, Jean-Baptiste) in 1816. The conductivity of water was first determined in 1839; the conductivity of gases was not measured until after 1860. Biot formulated the laws of conduction in 1804, and Fourier published a mathematical description of this phenomenon in 1822. In 1803 it was found that infrared (infrared radiation) rays are reflected and refracted as visible light is, and, thenceforth, the study of thermal radiation became part of the study of radiation in general. In 1859 a physicist in Germany, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff (Kirchhoff, Gustav Robert), presented his law of radiation, relating emissive power to absorptivity. An Austrian, Josef Stefan (Stefan, Josef), established the relationship (now called the Stefan-Boltzmann (Boltzmann, Ludwig Eduard) law) between the energy radiated by a blackbody and the fourth power of its temperature. Ludwig Boltzmann established the mathematical basis for this law of radiation in 1884. It was in the study of radiation that Max Planck arrived at the concept of the quantum. Understanding of heat transfer by convection was developed during the period 1880–1920, although an equation describing such processes had been suggested by Sir Isaac Newton in 1701.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Heat — (h[=e]t), n. [OE. hete, h[ae]te, AS. h[=ae]tu, h[=ae]to, fr. h[=a]t hot; akin to OHG. heizi heat, Dan. hede, Sw. hetta. See {Hot}.] 1. A force in nature which is recognized in various effects, but especially in the phenomena of fusion and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Heat — Título Heat Ficha técnica Dirección Michael Mann Producción Art Linson Michael Mann …   Wikipedia Español

  • HEAT — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom …   Wikipédia en Français

  • heat — ► NOUN 1) the quality of being hot; high temperature. 2) heat seen as a form of energy arising from the random motion of molecules. 3) a source or level of heat for cooking. 4) intensity of feeling, especially of anger or excitement. 5) (the… …   English terms dictionary

  • heat — heat·able; heat; heat·ed·ly; heat·ful; heat·ing·ly; heat·less; heat·ron·ic; pre·heat; heat·er; re·heat; su·per·heat; …   English syllables

  • HEAT — (englisch für Hitze) bezeichnet: Heat (1972), Film von Paul Morrissey aus dem Jahre 1972 Heat (1995), Film von Michael Mann aus dem Jahre 1995 beim Pferderennen ein Rennen über mehrere Läufe, siehe Pferderennen#Heat (Heatrennen) im Tanzsport… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • heat — [hēt] n. [ME hete < OE hætu < base of hat (see HOT), akin to Ger heiss < IE base * kai , heat] 1. the quality of being hot; hotness: in physics, heat is considered a form of energy existing as the result of the random motion of molecules …   English World dictionary

  • Heat — (englisch für Hitze) bezeichnet: Heat (1972), Film von Paul Morrissey aus dem Jahr 1972 Heat (1995), Film von Michael Mann aus dem Jahr 1995 beim Pferderennen ein Rennen über mehrere Läufe, siehe Heatrennen im Tanzsport jeden der Durchgänge pro… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Heat — (h[=e]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Heated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Heating}.] [OE. heten, AS. h[=ae]tan, fr. h[=a]t hot. See {Hot}.] 1. To make hot; to communicate heat to, or cause to grow warm; as, to heat an oven or furnace, an iron, or the like. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • HEAT — BK 14 soviético de 125 mm. High Explosive Anti Tank, por sus siglas en inglés, o explosivo antitanque de alto poder. Este tipo de munición utiliza el efecto Monroe, usado extensivamente durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial contra los carros rusos;… …   Wikipedia Español

  • heat — UK US /hiːt/ noun INFORMAL ● feel/take/face the heat Cf. take/face the heat ● turn up the heat (on sb/sth) Cf. turn up the heat on sth …   Financial and business terms


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