hackney


hackney
hackneyism, n.
/hak"nee/, n., pl. hackneys, adj., v.
n.
1. Also called hackney coach. a carriage or coach for hire; cab.
2. a trotting horse used for drawing a light carriage or the like.
3. a horse used for ordinary riding or driving.
4. (cap.) one of an English breed of horses having a high-stepping gait.
adj.
5. let out, employed, or done for hire.
v.t.
6. to make trite, common, or stale by frequent use.
7. to use as a hackney.
[1300-50; ME hakeney, special use of placename Hackney, Middlesex, England]

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      inner borough of London, in the historic county of Middlesex. Hackney lies north of the City of London (London, City of) and Tower Hamlets, and its eastern boundary is the River Lea (Lea, River). It was created a borough in 1965 by the amalgamation of the former metropolitan boroughs of Shoreditch, Hackney, and Stoke Newington. Hackney includes areas and historic villages such as (from north to south) Stoke Newington, Upper Clapton, Lea Bridge, Lower Clapton, Dalston, Homerton, Hackney Wick, Hackney, Kingsland, Haggerston, Hoxton, and Shoreditch. Shoreditch, near the City, is industrial and commercial in character, whereas the rest of Hackney is largely residential with pockets of industry, notably along the Lea valley.

      Stoke Newington was a site of Paleolithic settlement, and it later became a Saxon village. In the 18th century, Roman remains were discovered in the Hackney Marshes in the eastern part of the borough, an area that now contains football (soccer) and cricket fields. Shoreditch takes its name from a ditch that lay just outside the London wall as part of the city's medieval defenses. Hoxton was listed in Domesday Book (AD 1086) as pertaining to the canons of St. Paul's Cathedral (Saint Paul's Cathedral).

      The first Elizabethan playhouse, the Theatre (Theatre, The), stood in Shoreditch from 1576 to 1598. (This building was dismantled, and its materials were taken across the Thames to Bankside, where they were used to build the Globe Theatre.) From the 16th century onward many mansions were built in Hackney and, later, in Stoke Newington. The traditional associations of the borough with furniture and cabinetmaking trades are recalled by the exhibits of the Geffrye Museum in the former Ironmongers' Company almshouses (1715). The writer Daniel Defoe (Defoe, Daniel) resided with a Nonconformist community in Stoke Newington and was educated at Newington Green, where Edgar Allan Poe (Poe, Edgar Allan) also attended school from 1817 to 1820. In the Abney Park Cemetery (1840) are the graves of William Booth (Booth, William), founder of the Salvation Army, and his wife and son. Notable edifices include the Hackney Empire theatre (1901) and the redbrick Sutton House (early 16th century). The Hackney Museum contains exhibits on local history.

      The borough's public open space is extensive and includes Hackney Marshes, Hackney Downs, Clissold Park, Springfield Park, London Fields, and Millfields. The New River empties into reservoirs north of Clissold Park, and the Grand Union Canal traverses the borough.

      Hackney's commodious older housing, its location in the unfashionable East End, and its proximity to the centre of London has made it a natural reception area for successive waves of immigrants. Ethnic minorities constitute more than one-third of the borough's residents, with large numbers of Afro-Caribbeans. Stamford Hill is notable as a centre for Orthodox Jews. Area 7.4 square miles (19 square km). Pop. (2001) 202,824.

▪ breed of horse
      stylish carriage horse breed, now used primarily as a show horse. It was developed in the 18th century by crossing Thoroughbreds with the Norfolk trotter, a large-sized trotting harness horse originating in and around Norfolk. An important sire was the Shales horse (about 1760).

      Hackneys are heavily muscled, with wide chests, deep bodies, and arched necks; they average 14.2 to 15.2 hands (58 to 62 inches, or 147 to 157 centimetres) high and weigh about 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). Dark colours are commonest. Noted for their high-stepping, flashy trot, they are high-strung and nervous and must be carefully trained and handled.

      The first Hackney was taken to the United States in 1822, and in 1891 the American Hackney Horse Society was organized. See also Hackney pony.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Hackney — hat folgende Bedeutungen: ein Stadtbezirk von London, siehe London Borough of Hackney Metropolitan Borough of Hackney, ehemaliger Stadtbezirk von London eine Pferderasse, siehe Hackney (Pferd) Hackney ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Alan …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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  • Hackney — Hack ney, a. Let out for hire; devoted to common use; hence, much used; trite; mean; as, hackney coaches; hackney authors. Hackney tongue. Roscommon. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hackney [2] — Hackney (Hackney coach [spr. Hakkni Kohtsch], vom englischen hackney, d.i. zur Miethe dienend), englische Miethkutsche, Fiacre …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Hackney — Hack ney ( n[y^]), n.; pl. {Hackneys} ( n[i^]z). [OE. hakeney, hakenay; cf. F. haguen[ e]e a pacing horse, an ambling nag, OF. also haquen[ e]e, Sp. hacanea, OSp. facanea, D. hakkenei, also OF. haque horse, Sp. haca, OSp. faca; perh. akin to E.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Hackney — Hack ney, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Hackneyed} ( n[i^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Hackneying}.] 1. To devote to common or frequent use, as a horse or carriage; to wear out in common service; to make trite or commonplace; as, a hackneyed metaphor or quotation …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • *hackney — ● hackney nom masculin (anglais hackney, du nom propre) Race anglaise de chevaux trotteurs, encore appelée « trotteur de Norfolk » …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Hackney — late 12c., from O.E. Hacan ieg Haca s Isle (or possibly Hook Island ), the isle element here meaning dry land in a marsh. Now well within London, it once was pastoral and horses apparently were kept there. Hence hackney small saddle horse let out …   Etymology dictionary

  • hackney — ► NOUN (pl. hackneys) chiefly historical 1) a light horse with a high stepping trot, used in harness. 2) a horse drawn vehicle kept for hire. ORIGIN probably from Hackney in East London, where horses were pastured …   English terms dictionary


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