graft


graft
graft1
grafter, n.
/graft, grahft/, n.
1. Hort.
a. a bud, shoot, or scion of a plant inserted in a groove, slit, or the like in a stem or stock of another plant in which it continues to grow.
b. the plant resulting from such an operation; the united stock and scion.
c. the place where the scion is inserted.
2. Surg. a portion of living tissue surgically transplanted from one part of an individual to another, or from one individual to another, for its adhesion and growth.
3. an act of grafting.
v.t.
4. to insert (a graft) into a tree or other plant; insert a scion of (one plant) into another plant.
5. to cause (a plant) to reproduce through grafting.
6. Surg. to transplant (a portion of living tissue, as of skin or bone) as a graft.
7. to attach as if by grafting: an absurdity grafted onto an otherwise coherent body of thought.
8. Naut. to cover (a rope) with a weaving of rope yarn.
v.i.
9. to insert scions from one plant into another.
10. to become grafted.
[1350-1400; earlier graff, ME graffe, craffe < OF graife, greffe, graffe < LL graphium hunting knife (L: stylus) < Gk grapheion, deriv. of gráphein to write; so called from the resemblance of the point of a (cleft) graft to a stylus]
Syn. 10. implant, transplant, plant, join, adhere.
graft2
grafter, n.
/graft, grahft/, n.
1. the acquisition of money, gain, or advantage by dishonest, unfair, or illegal means, esp. through the abuse of one's position or influence in politics, business, etc.
2. a particular instance, method, or means of thus acquiring gain or advantage.
3. the gain or advantage acquired.
4. Brit. Slang. work; labor.
v.t.
5. to obtain by graft.
v.i.
6. to practice graft.
[1855-60; perh. special use of GRAFT1]

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In horticulture, the act of placing a portion of one plant (called a bud or scion) into or on a stem, root, or branch of another (called the stock) in such a way that a union forms and the partners continue to grow.

Grafting is used for various purposes: to repair injured trees, produce dwarf trees and shrubs, strengthen plants' resistance to certain diseases, retain varietal characteristics, adapt varieties to adverse soil or climatic conditions, ensure pollination, produce multifruited or multiflowered plants, and propagate certain species (such as hybrid roses) that can be propagated in no other way. In theory, any two plants that are closely related botanically and that have a continuous cambium can be grafted. Grafts between species of the same genus are often successful and between genera occasionally so, but grafts between families are nearly always failures.

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 in horticulture, the act of placing a portion of one plant (bud or scion) into or on a stem, root, or branch of another (stock) in such a way that a union will be formed and the partners will continue to grow. This term includes budding (bud grafting) and grafting proper (scion grafting and approach grafting or inarching). Budding and grafting proper differ only in the amount of plant material placed on the stock.

      In modern horticulture grafting is used for a variety of purposes: to repair injured trees, to produce dwarf trees and shrubs, to strengthen plants' resistance to certain diseases, to retain varietal characteristics, to adapt varieties to adverse soil or climatic conditions, to ensure pollination, to produce multifruited or multiflowered plants, and to propagate certain species (such as hybrid roses) that can be propagated in no other way.

      In theory any two plants that are closely related botanically and that have a continuous cambium can be grafted. Grafts between species are often successful, between genera occasionally so, between families nearly always failures. Within the genus the closeness of botanical relationship is not an infallible guide as to probable success, but in the absence of recorded experience it is the best available. The ability of two plants to continue to grow or be compatible when joined together by the asexual practice of grafting is mediated by many complex physiological and environmental factors.

      Compatibility or congeniality in grafting is of various degrees. Apple grafted on oak fails immediately; apple grafted on pear may grow well for one or two years but gradually weakens and dies. Some lilacs exist for a number of years on privet stocks but fail ultimately. The common apricot is, other things being equal, the best stock for apricot varieties, but in moist soils in cool regions apricot trees flourish better on certain plum stocks than on apricot. These differences in adaptability of closely related plants that can be successfully grafted permit a greater degree of adjustment to soil conditions than would ordinarily be possible.

      The establishment of union between grafted components is effected through the formation of a loose growth of cells (callus) contributed by both elements. These cells fuse into a mass so continuous in compatible grafts that the precise location of the line of union is frequently impossible to determine, even microscopically. Just as in wound healing, union proceeds more rapidly if the wounded areas are protected against drying out; and, in most forms of grafting, rapid knitting is essential to maintenance of life in the scion.

      The principles involved in grafting are based on the matching of scion and stock cambiums (cambium) (meristematic tissue, the cells of which are undifferentiated and capable of frequent cell division). Cambial tissue in most woody trees and shrubs is an inconspicuous single cell layer covering the central core of wood and lying directly beneath the bark.

      The success or failure of any grafting operation is based upon the compatibility of each plant part, closeness of fit, and cambial contact. The union is initially held in place by pressure exerted by the stock, by grafting tape, or by rubber budding strips applied over the point of union.

      Budding is effected by raising or removing a segment of bark of the stock and inserting a segment of the scion, containing a bud, into the wound thus made. In bud grafting involving fruit (fruit farming) trees, the bark is lifted away from around an upright or inverted T-shaped incision, and the bud is then inserted under the bark and tied securely in place. Grafting, on the other hand, usually involves the use of the complete circumference of a plant as the scion. Certain types of grafts thus may necessitate sawing through the trunk and inserting the scion in vertical slits made between the bark and wood of the trunk's bared core.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
(inserted in another tree), , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Graft — Graft, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Grafted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Grafting}.] [F. greffer. See {Graft}, n.] 1. To insert (a graft) in a branch or stem of another tree; to propagate by insertion in another stock; also, to insert a graft upon. [Formerly… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • graft — Ⅰ. graft [1] ► NOUN 1) a shoot from one plant inserted into a slit cut into another to form a new growth. 2) a piece of living bodily tissue that is transplanted surgically to replace diseased or damaged tissue. 3) an operation in which tissue is …   English terms dictionary

  • graft — I noun blackmail, bribery, corruption, exploitation, fraudulent income, hush money, illegal profit, illicit profit, illicit revenue, inserere, kickback, money illegally acquired, political corruption, profiteering, property illegally acquired,… …   Law dictionary

  • -graft- — [engl. graft = pfropfen]: in der Nomenklatur von Polymeren ein kursiv gesetztes Strukturinfix zur Beschreibung von ↑ Pfropfcopolymeren, bei denen auf eine (zuerst genannte) Hauptkette Seitenketten aufgepfropft sind, z. B. Polybutadien graft… …   Universal-Lexikon

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  • Graft — Graft, n. [OE. graff, F. greffe, originally the same word as OF. grafe pencil, L. graphium, Gr. ?, ?, fr. ? to write; prob. akin to E. carve. So named from the resemblance of a scion or shoot to a pointed pencil. Cf. {Graphic}, {Grammar.}] (a) A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Graft —   die, / en, Gräfte die, / , mit Wasser gefüllter Umfriedungsgraben, v. a. bei westfälischen Wasserschlössern. * * * Grạft, die; , en [mhd., ahd. graft, zu ↑graben; vgl. ↑Gracht] (Fachspr., sonst veraltet): Wassergraben um ein Schloss o. Ä.;… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • graft — [n1] transplant bud*, hybridization, implant, jointure, scion, shoot, slip, splice, sprout, union; concepts 113,257 graft [n2] payoff for fraud bribe, corruption, gain, hat*, hush money*, juice*, money, money under the table*, pay, payola*,… …   New thesaurus


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