gong


gong
gonglike, adj.
/gawng, gong/, n.
1. a large bronze disk, of Asian origin, having an upturned rim, that produces a vibrant, hollow tone when struck, usually with a stick or hammer that has a padded head.
2. a shallow bell sounded by a hammer operated electrically or mechanically: The fire-alarm system will automatically sound the gong.
3. (in a clock or watch) a rod or wire, either straight or bent into a spiral, on which the time is struck.
4. Brit. Slang. a medal or military decoration.
v.i.
5. to sound as a gong does; ring, chime, or reverberate.
[1800-10; < Malay, Javanese: any suspended bossed and rimmed gong; presumably imit.]

* * *

 type of Chinese bronze vessel used to serve wine, it was characterized by an unusually fine harmony between shape and decoration. It was produced during the Shang (c. 1600–1046 BC) and early Zhou (1046–256 BC) dynasties.

      The gong looked much like a sauce server, with a large spout extending from one end of the oval-section body and a vertical handle at the other end. All vessels classified as gong had a lid covering the entire top of the vessel, including the spout. The spout end of the lid typically had a bovine or feline head, and the opposite end had an owl or birdlike mask. These elements harmonized with the decoration of the body, which sometimes created the illusion of delineating the rest of the animal or provided complementary, zoomorphic motifs—such as the monster mask, or taotie—characteristic of the bronze art of the Shang and early Zhou.

 a circular metal plate-like percussion instrument, usually having a turned-down rim. In most forms it is struck in the centre with a felt- or leather-covered beater, producing a sound of either definite or indefinite pitch. Its vibrations issue from the centre, in contrast to bells (bell), which vibrate principally at the rim. Gongs may have shallow or deep rims (kettle gongs (kettle gong)) and may be bossed (knobbed in the centre) or unbossed. Rimless gongs occur occasionally.

      Gongs are pictured in China in the 6th century AD and were used in Java by the 9th century. (The word gong is Javanese.) A deep-rimmed Roman gong from the 1st or 2nd century AD was excavated in Wiltshire, Eng. Flat gongs are found throughout South and East Asia, and knobbed gongs dominate in Southeast Asia. Flat gongs (gangsa) used in ensembles of the northern mountains of the Philippines are struck by hand, like drums, and create resultant melodies through the use of various rhythmic patterns. The kulintang ensembles of the southern Philippines use a rack of tuned, knobbed gongs, but the musicians define pieces through rhythmic patterns rather than specific melodies. The bossed gong chimes of Southeast Asian ensembles may either play melodies or function as time markers, i.e., they define large rhythmic units. In East and Southeast Asian religions, knobbed gongs are used to mark sections of chant or ceremony. Large bossed gong ensembles such as the saing-waing of Myanmar (Burma), pi phat of Thailand, and gamelan of Indonesia continue a rich tradition of concert, theatre, and ceremonial music.

      The Western orchestra uses the flat Chinese gong of indefinite pitch (called tam-tam in the West); beginning in the late 20th century, some composers called for such gongs to be played by passing a violin bow along the edge. Occasionally, orchestral music calls for the use of deep-rimmed gong chimes. Acoustically, steel drums (steel drum) of the type originated in Trinidad are multiple-toned gongs.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • gong — gong …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • GONG — Instrument à percussion, métallophone à son déterminé, le gong fait partie, comme les cymbales, des idiophones à plaques. Il est formé d’un disque de bronze ou de cuivre, au bord recourbé (le disque de la cymbale a le bord «libre»); il est… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Gong — [gɔŋ], der; s, s: [frei aufzuhängende] runde Scheibe aus Metall, die, mit einem Klöppel angeschlagen, einen vollen, hallenden Ton hervorbringt, der als eine Art Signal dienen soll: der Gong ertönte und die Gäste gingen zu Tisch. * * * Gọng 〈m.… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • gong — GONG, gonguri, s.n. Disc de metal care, lovit cu un ciocănel special, produce un sunet caracteristic, fiind întrebuinţat ca instrument muzical sau de chemare, de semnalizare. ♦ Sunet emis (ca semnal) de acest disc. – Din fr., engl. gong. Trimis… …   Dicționar Român

  • GONG — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom …   Wikipédia en Français

  • gong — ou gong gong (gongh ou gongh gongh ) s. m. Synonyme de tam tam. SUPPLÉMENT AU DICTIONNAIRE    GONG. Ajoutez : REM. Le gong n est pas synonyme de tam tam. Le gong est un instrument de cuivre que l on frappe, et le tam tam est recouvert d une peau… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Gong — Основная информация Ж …   Википедия

  • Gong Li — 2007 beim Cannes Film Festival Gǒng Lì (chinesisch 鞏俐 / 巩俐) (* 31. Dezember 1965 in Shenyang, Liaoning) ist eine Schauspielerin chinesischer Herkunft mit singapurischer Staatsbürger …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Gong — Gong, n. [AS. gong, gang, a going, passage, drain. See {Gang}.] A privy or jakes. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] {Gong farmer}, {Gong man}, a cleaner of privies. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gong — Gong, n. 1. [Malayan (Jav.) g[=o]ng.] An instrument, first used in the East, made of an alloy of copper and tin, shaped like a disk with upturned rim, and producing, when struck, a harsh and resounding noise. [1913 Webster] O er distant deserts… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gong Fm — (eigene Schreibweise: gong fm) ist ein privater deutscher Radiosender mit Sitz in Regensburg, Bayern. Gong FM wird von dem Unternehmen Funkhaus Regensburg GmbH Co. Studiobetriebs KG produziert, das insgesamt drei Radiosender betreibt. Das… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.