glucose


glucose
glucosic, adj.
/glooh"kohs/, n. Biochem.
1. a sugar, C6H12O6, having several optically different forms, the common dextrorotatory form (dextroglucose, or d-glucose) occurring in many fruits, animal tissues and fluids, etc., and having a sweetness about one half that of ordinary sugar, and the rare levorotatory form (levoglucose, or l -glucose) not naturally occurring.
2. Also called starch syrup. a syrup containing dextrose, maltose, and dextrine, obtained by the incomplete hydrolysis of starch.
[1830-40; < F < Gk glyk(ýs) sweet + F -ose -OSE2]

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Organic compound, a simple sugar (monosaccharide), chemical formula C6H12O6.

The product of photosynthesis in plants, it is found in fruits and honey. As the major circulating free sugar in blood, it is the source of energy in cell function and a major participant in metabolism. Control of its level and metabolism is of great importance (see insulin). Glucose and fructose make up sucrose. Glucose units in long chains make up polysaccharides (e.g., cellulose, glycogen, starch). Glucose is used in foods, medicine, brewing, and wine making and as the source of various other organic chemicals.

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also called  dextrose,  
 one of a group of carbohydrates known as simple sugars (monosaccharides). Glucose (from Greek glykys; “sweet”) has the molecular formula C6H12O6. It is found in fruits and honey and is the major free sugar circulating in the blood of higher animals. It is the source of energy in cell function, and the regulation of its metabolism is of great importance (see fermentation; gluconeogenesis). Molecules of starch, the major energy-reserve carbohydrate of plants, consist of thousands of glucose units, as do those of cellulose (q.v.). Also composed of glucose is glycogen (q.v.), the reserve carbohydrate in most vertebrate and invertebrate animal cells, as well as those of numerous fungi and protozoans. See also polysaccharide.

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Universalium. 2010.

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