giant


giant
giantlike, adj.
/juy"euhnt/, n.
1. (in folklore) a being with human form but superhuman size, strength, etc.
2. a person or thing of unusually great size, power, importance, etc.; major figure; legend: a giant in her field; an intellectual giant.
3. (often cap.) Class. Myth. any of the Gigantes.
4. Mining. monitor (def. 12).
5. Astron. See giant star.
adj.
6. unusually large, great, or strong; gigantic; huge.
7. greater or more eminent than others.
[1250-1300; ME geant < OF < L gigant- (s. of gigas) < Gk Gígas; r. OE gigant < L, as above]

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(as used in expressions)
giant order

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      in folklore, huge mythical being, usually humanlike in form. The term derives (through Latin) from the Giants (Gigantes) of Greek mythology, who were monstrous, savage creatures often depicted with men's bodies terminating in serpentine legs. According to the Greek poet Hesiod, they were sons of Ge (“Earth”) and Uranus (“Heaven”). The Gigantomachy was a desperate struggle between the Giants and the Olympians. The gods finally prevailed through the aid of Heracles the archer, and the Giants were slain. Many of them were believed to lie buried under mountains and to indicate their presence by volcanic fires and earthquakes. The Gigantomachy became a popular artistic theme (found, for example, on the frieze adorning the great altar at Pergamum), and it was interpreted as a symbol of the triumph of Hellenism over barbarism, of good over evil.

      The giants of Norse mythology were primeval beings existing before the gods and overcome by them. Giants in folklore were mortals who inhabited the world in early times. Israelite spies in Canaan saw giants (Numbers 13:32–33), and such beings once, in legend, roamed Cornwall in Britain (see Corineus).

      European medieval towns often had tutelary giants whose effigies were carried in procession. In London the giant figures of Gog (Gog and Magog) (q.v.) and Magog are said to represent two Cornish giants made captive by Brutus, the legendary founder of Britain. The 40-foot (12-metre) effigy of Druon Antigonus at Antwerp and the 22-foot (7-metre) figure of Gayant at Douai, Fr., preserve similar traditions.

      In most European tales giants appear as cruel and stupid, given to cannibalism, and often one-eyed. Heroes who killed them often did so more by wit than by strength. Although kindly giants occur (e.g., Rübezahl, who lived in the Bohemian forest), most were feared and hated; but marriages between their daughters and the hero were possible.

      Hill figures, such as the giant of Cerne cut in the chalk near Cerne Abbas, Dorset, as well as megalithic monuments and long barrows, suggested giant builders of the past; and an ancient European tradition held that people had once been taller and stronger but had degenerated after a golden age.

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Universalium. 2010.

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